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B Rampf Session 2
 

B Rampf Session 2

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    B Rampf Session 2 B Rampf Session 2 Presentation Transcript

    • Global Communication Pamplona, 1-3 March 2010 Barbara Rampf, M.A. IfKW, LMU Munich
    • Agenda
      • Communication, Media and the Rise of the Internet
      • Media (R)evolution and the Challenges of Digitalization
      • New, Social and Future Media
    • Session 2 Global Communication Barbara Rampf, M.A. 2 March 2010
    • Media (R)evolution
    • Evolution vs. Revolution
    • The Evolution of Media (1609-2000) Source: Merten 2008: 479 Number of media Year
    • Media (R)evolution
      • “ Anytime we have new forms of communication, it changes behavior whether it is political or business or any type of behavior. Radio and TV did that. The PC will be classed as big or bigger an advancement in communications than those devices were.”
      • (Bill Gates, Founder of Microsoft Co.)
    • The (R)evolution of Marketing Taken from slideshare.com; sources: Internet Advertising Bureau 2004, Darwin Day Conference by Google
    • Substitution vs. Complementarity
    • Communication is changing Time Squeeze Media choice Hours in a day Source: www.ppamarketing.net
    • Fragmentation
      • 13,500 radio stations (4,400 in 1960)
      • 17,300 magazine titles (8,400 in 1960)
      • 82.4 TV channels per home (5.7 in 1960)
      • … and the Web…
        • Millions of sites
        • Billions of pages
      Taken from slideshare.com; sources: “Left Brain Marketing,” Forrester Research (April 2004); “The Vanishing Mass Market,” BusinessWeek (July 2004)
    • Digitalization of Media Taken from slideshare.com; source: Darwin Day Conference by Google
    • New audiences… ‘‘ The fragmentation of large but politically focused mass audiences into a huge number of isolated issue publics.‘‘ (Habermas 2006: 423-424)
    • The new audience…
    • What‘s new?
    • Multiplication of personally owned media
      • ‘‘ Old media familiar to us all are being used in new arrangements of space and time as households come to possess multiple televisions, telephones, radios, etc.‘‘
      • (Livingstone 1999: 62)
    • Diversifying in form and contents
      • ‘‘ Both ‘old‘ and ‘current‘ media are diversifying in form and contents, resulting in local and global, general and specialized television channels, in diverse kinds of computer and video game, and so forth.‘‘
      • (Livingstone 1999: 62)
    • Convergent forms of informational services
      • ‘‘ The […] swift towards convergent forms of informational services, as media, information, and telecommunications services become interconnected is faciliated by the emergence of the more recent media […] as well as by both the multiplication and diversification of media.‘‘
      • (Livingstone 1999: 62)
    • Interactive communication
      • ‘‘ The potentially most radical change of all, and one that is still more prospective than actual, is the shift from one-way, mass communcation towards more interactive communcation between medium and user.‘‘
      • (Livingstone 1999: 63)
    • What‘s new about the Internet?
      • ‘‘ What‘s new about the Internet may be the combination of interactivity with those features which were innovative for mass communication – the unlimited range of content, the scope of the audience reach, the global nature of communication.‘‘
      • (Livingstone 1999: 65)
    • New Opportunities ‘‘ Having coffee!‘‘
    • New Problems
    • Internet Usage
    • Hours spent online per week [Base: All European internet users (n=6021)] Hours Source: EIAA Mediascope Europe Study 2008
    • Media Usage
    • Hours spent per week using each media (Germany) Average number of hours per week [Base: All Germany respondents using each media (TV=943, radio=871, internet=611, newspapers=884, magazines=623)] Source: EIAA Mediascope Europe Study 2008
    • Hours spent per week using each media (Spain) Average number of hours per week [Base: All Spain respondents using each media (TV=944, radio=697, internet=539, newspapers=630, magazines=366)] Source: EIAA Mediascope Europe Study 2008
    • Hours spent per week watching television (Germany vs. Spain) Average number of hours per week Source: EIAA Mediascope Europe Study 2008
    • Hours spent per week reading newspapers (Germany vs. Spain) Average number of hours per week Source: EIAA Mediascope Europe Study 2008
    • Hours spent per week listening to the radio (Germany vs. Spain) Average number of hours per week Source: EIAA Mediascope Europe Study 2008
    • Hours spent per week using the Internet (Germany vs. Spain) Average number of hours per week Source: EIAA Mediascope Europe Study 2008
    • TV vs. Internet
    • Media use during the day (Germany) [Base: All Germany respondents using each media (TV=906, newspapers=827, magazines=555, radio=847, internet=578)] 06:00 10:00 to 10:00 17:30 to 17:30 21:00 to 21:00 06:00 to Source: EIAA Mediascope Europe Study 2008
    • Media use during the day (Spain) [Base: All Spain respondents using each media (TV=897, newspapers=556, magazines=317, radio=663, internet=531)] 06:00 10:00 to 10:00 17:30 to 17:30 21:00 to 21:00 06:00 to Source: EIAA Mediascope Europe Study 2008
    • Frequency of TV usage vs. online (Germany) Source: EIAA Mediascope Europe Study 2008 Number of days per week
    • Frequency of TV usage vs. online (Spain) Number of days per week Source: EIAA Mediascope Europe Study 2008
    • Motivations
      • Information
      • Entertainment
      • Relaxation
      • Information
      • Entertainment
      • Inspiration
      Source: Langzeitstudie Massenkommunikation 2005
    • Impact of Internet on TV
      • TV is the medium the Internet has the greatest impact on
      • 1/3 of the German Onliners watches less TV since Internet use
      • 1/5 attaches less importance to TV since Internet use
      • (Öhmichen & Schröter 2006: 445)
    • Will the Internet replace TV?
      • Lean-back medium
      • ‘‘ Co-Viewing‘‘: TV as a social medium
      • Fulfilment of specific media needs
      • Social in a different way
      • Multimedia platform that integrates all kinds of electronic media
      • Covers multiple media uses and gratifications
      No Yes
    • Concerns about Internet and TV
      • Isolation of people by WWW
      • Availability of indecent content on the WWW
      • Replacement of TV with Internet
    • Chances for TV
      • Adapt to onliner habits
      • Adopt Internet characteristics
      • Individualisation, personalization
      • Time shifting
      • New ways of distribution
      • Decoupling of content and carrier media
    • Future of Media
    • Future of media Creatd with wordle.net
    • The Internet is the future home of all media.
      • “ I don’t own a TV. I don’t get the daily newspaper.  I find both of those mediums tedious and boring. Many of my peers feel similarly. Why be spoon fed content by editors when I can create a personalized experience with what I’m interested in receiving? I say, bring on the death of mass media entities – they serve to bland our culture and normalize us. Perhaps the world would be more interesting and diverse without them?“
      • (Adam Singer on TheFutureBuzz.com, a blog about web marketing/PR strategies
    • Internet goes mobile Source: http://www.gartner.com: Gartner's Top Predictions for IT Organizations and Users, 2010 and Beyond: A New Balance.
    • Prometeus – The Media Revolution
    • Thank you for your attention!
      • Barbara Rampf, M.A.
      • Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität
      • Institut für Kommunikationswissenschaft und Medienforschung
      • Schellingstraße 3
      • D-80799 München
      • Phone: +49 (89) 2180-9440
      • Fax: +49 (89) 2180-9429
      • E-Mail: rampf@ifkw.lmu.de