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Here is the 2009 Educational Achievement Report for our XIII Annual San Diego County Latino Summit.

Here is the 2009 Educational Achievement Report for our XIII Annual San Diego County Latino Summit.

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  • Table of Contents Preface 2 Latino Demographics 5 English Learner Demographics 13 Staffing 15 California Standards Test (CST) 17 Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) 21, 23 California English Language Development Test (CELDT) 22, 24 Special Education 25 Gifted and Talented Education (GATE) 28 A Through G Completion 31 California High School Exit Exam (CAHSEE) 36 Advanced Placement (AP) 40 Graduation Rates 42 Scholastic Aptitude Test 48 IHE Enrollment & Graduation 52 California Prison and Civilian Populations 62 U.S. Drop out, Education, and Income trends 63
  • Preface The purpose of this report is to consider the academic performance of San Diego County’s 214,369 Latino students. It is often overlooked that nearly half of all Latino students are English learners. It is important to keep this in mind when considering Latino student performance data. Consideration of this information is critical since, presently, 43.4% of San Diego County and 48.1% of California K-12 students are Latinos. Several state agencies predict that Latinos will become the largest ethnic group in the state, surpassing Whites in the 2020s. It is economically incumbent, then, for the entire community to take responsibility in addressing their educational needs. Educationally, the academic achievement of Latinos is at or near the bottom in every indicator. The low educational attainment is not simply a result of  recent immigration. U.S. born Latinos consistently have lower high school and college completion rates than any other group. Given the above trends, the urgency of the Latino Education Summit is to raise community leadership and social consciousness in working to provide equal educational benefits to our students, from pre-school through higher education.
  • San Diego County has undergone a sizeable demographic shift in the past twenty years. In the last ten years in particular, overall student enrollment has increased 9.8%. In the same time frame, however, the number of Latino students has increased 39.3%. The number of students who come to school not proficient in English has increased by 23%. We’ve also seen profound changes in ethnic diversity. While the number of Latino students continues to increase dramatically, Filipino and Asian students have increased 0.2% and 17% respectively. By contrast, Anglo students are numerically fewer than ten years ago by 14.4%, and African American students have decreased by 11.2%.
  • For the last few years, Latino students have been the largest single ethnic group in local schools. Since 1970, Anglo enrollment has declined from 78.9% to 35.2% of the student population. In the same time frame, the percentage of Latino students has more than tripled, increasing from 12% to 43.4%. Unofficial projections for the county indicate that in the 2010-2011 school year, Anglo enrollment will be approximately 33% while Latino enrollment will be approximately 52%.
  • California’s K-12 student population changed significantly from 1996-97 to 2006-07. In 1996-97, the K-12, student public school population was already a majority “ethnically diverse.” White students accounted for only 39.5% . In 2006-07, the K-12 student population was 70.6% ethnically diverse non-white.
  • California’s population is far more ethnically diverse than the U.S. as a whole (US Census Bureau, 2000). In 2000, California was already a majority “ethnically diverse” state. Whites accounted for only 47.1% of the population compared to 69.1 % of the U.S. as a whole. Latinos constituted 32.4% of the population compared to 12.5% of the U.S. Asians constituted 11% of the population compared to 3.7% of the U.S. as a whole. African Americans constituted 6.5% of the population compared to 12.1% of the U.S. as a whole. By 2020 the White population will drop to approximately one-third of the total California population.
  • In the past decade, Latino enrollment has increased from 153,835 to 214,369 students, a 39% increase. The growth in the Latino student population is largely responsible for the 9.8% growth in the overall student population. South County districts have the largest percentage of Latino students -- 89.5% in San Ysidro, 81.5% in National, 78% in South Bay, 71.6% in Sweetwater, and 64.9% in Chula Vista. By itself, San Diego Unified enrolls 26.6% of all Latino students in San Diego County. San Diego Unified, Sweetwater, and Chula Vista combined enroll 48.8% of all Latino students. The 13 districts on this chart account for 85.2% of all Latino students in the county. The district showing the largest percentage gain in Latino students for two consecutive years is San Marcos Unified, where the Latino student population has increased from 4,866 students to 7,994 students in the past decade -- a 64% increase.
  • In the same year, 43.4% of students were Latino, and 35.2% of students were Anglo.
  • In both San Diego County and California, Latinos comprise 15% of all teachers. The percentage of Latino administrators and pupil services personnel in San Diego County is nearly the same as elsewhere in the state. In general, South County districts with the largest percentage of Latino students also have the largest percentage of Latino teachers, administrators, and pupil services personnel. On this table, Vista, South Bay, and National school districts experienced a decline in the number of Latino teachers from the previous academic year.
  • English learners account for 23% of San Diego County students. Nearly eighty-seven percent of English learners in San Diego County are native Spanish speakers. Many high school students classified as English learners are relatively recent arrivals to the U.S. rather than students who have received most of their education in U.S. schools. Over 50 languages are spoken by students classified as English learners in San Diego County, as counted by the California Dept. of Education’s annual Language Census. Languages spoken by at least 100 English learners, in addition to those above, include Cantonese, Kurdish, Hmong, Russian, Samoan, Ilocano, and French.
  • Only a small percentage of English learners are taught in bilingual classes (classes where a significant portion of the instruction is provided in the student’s home language). In San Diego County, districts report that 10.5% of English learners are taught in bilingual classes, down from 21% three years previous. Statewide, this ratio is 5.6%. These classes require an approved parental exception waiver. The vast majority of English learners are taught in classes where instruction is almost exclusively or completely in English, Structured English Immersion (SEI) and mainstream. In San Diego County, 42.2% of English learners are taught in mainstream classes, and 47.3% are taught in Structured English Immersion (which in most districts is indistinguishable from mainstream). As English-only instruction for English learners has increased, so has the achievement gap.
  • The California Standards Test (CST) measures the extent to which students have mastered California’s curriculum standards. Scores are reported in terms of five proficiency levels: advanced, proficient, basic, below basic, and far below basic. This and the next chart report the percentage of students scoring in the top two categories: advanced and proficient. The CST English/Language Arts exam is taken by all California public school students in grades 2-11. Scores in the CST English/Language Arts exam showed modest improvement in 2007 when compared to 2006.
  • In spite of the modest increases in performance for all ethnic and language status groups, a wide academic performance gap continues to exist, particularly for Latino students.
  • Scores of the CST mathematics exam showed tremendous improvement in 2005 when compared to 2004. An increase of 3 percentage points is considered significant. A growth of more than 3 percentage points is remarkable. Math CST results for 2007 show little or no improvement from 2006.
  • The federal statute “No Child Left Behind” requires that all schools be evaluated to determine if they are making Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP). AYP is computed not only for the overall student population, but also for several subgroups including Latino and low-income (socio-economically disadvantaged) students. For elementary and middle schools, AYP is determined by performance on the CST in English/Language Arts (ELA) and math. In high school, the California High School Exit Exam is also used (students must achieve a scaled score of 373 in math and 378 in English to be considered proficient; 350 is passing). The required performance benchmarks for ELA and mathematics increased three years ago from 13.6% and 16% to 24.4% and 26.5% respectively. An interesting paradox is that the federal definition for an English learner includes that the student is not proficient at grade level in the core academic areas.
  • When analyzing the data on the previous page, one should not fail to consider the fact that almost half of Latino students are English learners (ELs). This table indicates the percentage of ELs at each level of English proficiency as measured by the California English Language Development Test (CELDT). These CELDT results are from ELs that are included in the AYP subgroup (previous page). The EL subgroup in AYP also includes all reclassified students (former English learners). Secondary school districts and districts in areas of higher socio-economic status tend to have higher proportions of reclassified students. Such students, by definition, produce higher test scores. In San Diego County, approximately two-thirds of ELs are found in grades K-6.
  • For two years in a row, the greatest performance gaps between Whites and Latinos in both subject areas among high school districts are found in Escondido Union High School District. Among unified school districts, the largest gaps are found in San Diego Unified for Language Arts and Vista Unified for mathematics. The required performance benchmarks for ELA and mathematics increased three years ago from 11.2% and 9.6% to 23% and 26.5% respectively. Nearly every district in San Diego County has proficiency levels for Latino students above the state average.
  • As noted earlier, results from the annual CELDT assessment must be considered when analyzing Latino and English learner academic achievement data. The goal in California for English learners is that these students will grow in English proficiency by one level each year. These are not matched data; however, since these figures are for annual assessments only, the percentage of ELs at the Beginning level should be as low as possible. This principle applies Kindergarten through grade 12.
  • Special education provides services to students with learning disabilities and/or physical handicaps. Percentages are calculated by dividing the special education number by total enrollment for each ethnic group. Comparisons can then be made for proportional representation. Theoretically, learning disabilities and physical handicaps occur in the same proportion irrespective of ethnic background. Therefore, the same percentage of students from each ethnic group should be identified in special education. This table shows that Latinos are twice as likely as Asians to be misidentified for special education. African-Americans are nearly three times as likely to be misidentified as Asian students.
  • For those disabilities where ethnic or language bias is not a factor for identification (e.g. physical, mental, or multiple), the ratios are fairly similar for all ethnic groups. For those disabilities where ethnic or language bias can play a factor, the ratios vary widely. The most significant discrepancies lie in the identification of students for specific learning disabilities. Approximately half of Latinos and African Americans receiving special education services are identified for specific learning disabilities which are more nebulous to define.
  • This is staffing data for the three districts with the largest Latino enrollment. There are two ways to interpret these data. Looking at the percentage of bilingual teachers relative to all teachers, 8.2% of Chula Vista’s special education teachers are bilingual. The ratios are 7.7% and 2.7% for Sweetwater and San Diego Unified, respectively. Looking at Latino student/bilingual teacher ratios, Chula Vista is at 186.6 to 1; Sweetwater is 181.1 to 1; and San Diego Unified is 188.6 to 1. Regardless of which of these perspectives is used, there are insufficient numbers of bilingual special education teachers.
  • International research indicates that there exists no valid connection between intelligence and ethnicity. Hence, intelligence and learning abilities should be present in equal rates in all ethnicities. However, there exist serious discrepancies in the rates of identification for giftedness. One possible factor is the widespread myth that giftedness is related to academic performance in English. If ethnicity and language proficiency were not factors, these rates would be similar. These figures are the inverse of those for special education. Here, Latinos are one third as likely to be identified as gifted as Asians.
  • If schools did an adequate job of accurately identifying students for giftedness, they would be present in Gifted and Talented Education (GATE) in approximately the same proportion as their percentage of the population. No district in San Diego County identifies Latinos for giftedness at rates comparable to their overall enrollment. Identification in GATE is a major criteria for student enrollment in advanced courses at the secondary level. These in turn are weighted more heavily towards UC/CSU admissions “a through g” course requirements. Thus, identification for giftedness is a significant academic roadblock for most Latinos.
  • The “a through g” completion rate measures the percentage of high school graduates who completed the 15 year-long courses required for admission to the University of California (UC) and California State University (CSU) systems. A grade of “C” or better is required in order for a course to be counted. The “a through g” course sequence consists of four years of English; three years of math; two years of history, laboratory science, and foreign language; one year of visual and performing arts; and one year of approved electives. The “a through g” requirements were common to both UC and CSU for the first time in Fall 2003. The percentage of students completing these UC/CSU required courses has increased significantly since 1985, when only 25.6% of students completed the UC/CSU course sequence. However, “a through g” completion rates have been flat in the past few years.
  • UC/CSU “a through g” completion rates vary considerably by ethnicity, with rates among Asian, Filipino, and Anglo students at approximately twice the rate for African American and Latino students.
  • After six years of relatively no growth in Latino “a through g” completion rates, San Diego County has finally reached the 25% benchmark. This overall increase is largely fueled by increases in Sweetwater Union and San Marcos Unified. San Diego City Schools also has reached a 25% “a through g” completion rate for Latinos; however, for several years it has had the biggest achievement gap (p.23) and highest drop out rate for Latinos (p.46).
  • The graduating class of 2006 was required to pass the California High School Exit Exam (CAHSEE) as an additional requirement for graduation. The CAHSEE changed four years ago in that a small number of more difficult problems were replaced with ones that reflect minimum performance expectations. According to last year’s results, 70% of 10th grade Latino students passed the mathematics portion of the High School Exit Exam, an increase of 1% from the previous year, but an increase of 12% from two years prior. There was no growth from the previous year in the English portion. Latino students still have a lot of catching up to do.
  • English learners are allowed to take the exam with minor accommodations (such as a glossary of academic terms). Even so, ELs are expected to pass a test written in an academic language that they are still learning.
  • San Diego County’s Advanced Placement programs are among the best in the nation and California. Even as enrollment and and the number of tests taken increase, so has the qualifying rate. The 2005-2006 school year is the first to show a decline, albeit insignificant. The AP qualifying rate is calculated by dividing the number of AP exams earning a score of 3 or better by the number of students enrolled in grades 11 and 12 and multiplying by 100. Please note that AP qualifying rates are NOT the percentage of exams passed.
  • Participation in Advanced Placement (AP) offers students the chance to earn college credit while in high school. A score of 3, 4, or 5 on rigorous, end-of-course AP exams is accepted for credit at most U.S. colleges and universities. AP qualifying rates have shown improvement for African American, Asian, and Anglo students in the past five years. The qualifying rate for Latinos is slightly less than it was five years ago. AP success remains largely an Asian and Anglo phenomenon. Please note the majority of AP exams passed by Latino students consist of the AP Spanish Language exam (which has over a 95% pass rate for Latino test-takers). Absent this exam, Latino results are considerably lower.
  • One way to estimate graduation rates is to compare 8th and 9th grade enrollment with the number of high school graduates four and five years later. It should be stressed that these are estimates, however, because individual students are not tracked; nor does this method account for an influx of students in later grades. Until the state develops a system to accurately track students who change districts, or leave school and then return, more precise numbers will be lacking. It may seem paradoxical that five-year graduation rates computed for the 8th grade cohort are higher than four-year graduation rates computed for 9th graders. This is because 9th grade enrollment is swollen by a large number of second-year 9th graders, i.e., students who have not earned enough credits to be classified as 10th graders. Based on the 8th grade cohort, SD County’s overall graduation rate is 79% and the Latino graduation rate is 70%. Based on the 9th grade cohort, the county graduation rate is 71% and the Latino rate is 62%.
  • After experiencing modest increases over the previous three years, graduation rates decreased for most ethnic groups. Once again, it is important to note that 2006 was the first year in which seniors were required to pass the High School Exit Exam. It is likely that it had an effect on graduation rates.
  • Despite educators’ longstanding efforts to bring attention to the alarmingly high dropout rate among Latino students, little has changed to stem the tide of failure.
  • While districts have individually experienced brief, small increases in the Latino graduation rate, the overall rate in the county is the same as it was five years ago.
  • The SAT verbal exam consists of 40 critical reading questions, 19 sentence completion questions, and 19 analogies. It takes 75 minutes. The SAT exam was recentered in 1995 and the national mean was set at 500 (which equates to about 35 correct answers). All scores reported here use the same recentered scale. Since 1993, SAT verbal scores have increased 9 points. These gains have come almost entirely from improved performance by Asian and Anglo students. Even though SAT scores have increased overall, the achievement gap is much greater now than it was in 1993.
  • The SAT math exam consists of 60 questions covering basic mathematics, problem-solving, algebra, and geometry. The test takes 75 minutes. The SAT exam was recentered in 1995 and the national mean was set at 500 (which equates to about 27 correct answers). All scores reported here use the same recentered scale. Since 1993, SAT math scores have increased 17 points overall. Again, however, the achievement gap has widened.
  • The discrepancies in achievement among ethnic groups are compounded. Assuming that current graduation rates remain static, only 42.4% of current 9th grade Latinos will continue on to higher education. In contrast, approximately 69.8% of Asian/Pacific Islander 9th graders will continue on to higher education.* *Figures are derived by obtaining the product of 4-year graduation rate and college going rate. The combined graduation rate for Asians and Pacific Islanders is derived by weighing the individual rates by 9th grade enrollment for each ethnic group.
  • The community college enrollment pattern for Latinos is almost parallel to that of White students. However, the gap in their numbers is decreasing, perhaps reflecting the changes in the enrollment numbers of each ethnic group in K - 12 schools.
  • After thirteen years in a system that has largely failed to meet their educational needs, Latinos, African-Americans, and American Indians continue to achieve at levels lower than Asians and Whites even in institutes of higher education.
  • In June 2005, San Diego County graduated 29,069 high school seniors. In the following academic year, 6,049 of these graduates (20.8%) enrolled in local community colleges and an additional 8,324 students (28.6%) enrolled at a local public 4-year university. Of the county’s 9,719 Latino graduates, 22% met “a-g” and 4,120 (42.4%) enrolled in local colleges.
  • More Latinos are enrolled in San Diego State University than at University of California, San Diego. In spite of this, Latinos comprise only 21.3% of the undergraduate student population at SDSU.
  • California State University system continuation rates for Latinos are similar to those of Whites for the first two years. However, the rates for graduating within six years vary significantly. There are many factors that could contribute to this discrepancy: K-12 preparation, socio-economic factors, personal issues, etc.
  • California does not publish matched student-level data in either the K - 12 or the higher education systems. Thus, it is necessary to splice various academic indicators to produce a construct such as this one. In order to make this report as relevant as possible, all of the indicators used here are based on 2005 data (with the exception of UC graduation rate.) This slide should be interpreted in the following manner: At random, take 539 9th grade Latino students. Of these, 328 will graduate from high school (source: California Department of Education). From this group, only 100 will go on to college or university. Of the 100 college freshmen, 11 enroll in the UC system, 26 enroll in the CSU system, and 63 enroll in a community college. Of the 63 who enroll in community college, only 18 transfer as sophomores to a California public 4-year university. Of those who attended the UC system, about 69% complete a bachelor’s within 6 years (http://www.ucop.edu/news/factsheets/2003/grad_rates.pdf). Of those attending a CSU campus, about 40% complete a bachelor’s within 6 years. In essence then, out of 539 9th grade Latino students only 26 become public university graduates— less than 5%.
  • The pipeline metaphor is used to describe how students move through the primary, secondary, and postsecondary levels of education. For some groups the pipeline functions well, but for Latinos the pipeline does not ensure a smooth flow. Of every 100 that start in elementary in the United States, 54 will graduate from high school. From these high school graduates, 11 will graduate from college, 4 will complete graduate or professional school, and less than 1 will receive a doctorate.
  • While prison ethnic populations are fairly evenly distributed, they do not proportionately reflect the civilian ethnic populations. Latinos and African Americans are far more likely than Whites to be incarcerated. If race and ethnicity were not social factors in access to education and economic well-being, these population percentages would be proportional.
  • In the United States, a higher ratio of students from low income families fail to complete high school. This exacerbates an already alarming condition. High school dropouts earn less than high school graduates and considerably less than college graduates.
  • Among Latino adults 18-65 years old, 40.8% have not earned a high school diploma. In comparison, only 10.7% of Whites fail to do so. Latinos are least likely to continue on to and complete a college degree.
  • Referencing the two previous slides, 69.3% of Latinos in 2005 earned in the lowest two income levels.
  • The Internet is a tremendous resource for obtaining information about schools in San Diego County.

Transcript

  • 1.
    • Prepared by
    • San Diego County Coalition for Latino Education
    OCTOBER 25, 2008 EDUCATIONAL ACHIEVEMENT REPORT LATINO SUMMIT XIII
  • 2. SD County Education Statistics
    • Students 494,016 499,750
    • School Districts 42 42
    • Schools 737 649
    • Teachers* 25,176 25,544
    • Administrators* 2,107 2,075
    • Pupil Services Personnel** 2,529 2,358
    • Full-Time Classified Staff 15,248 12,546
    • Part-Time Classified Staff 8,816 12,089
    * Full-Time Equivalent (FTE) ** Counselors, Psychologists, Nurses, Speech/Hearing Specialists, and Librarians (FTE) 2007-08 2002-03
  • 3. San Diego County’s Changing Student Population
    • Number of Students 494,016 460,949 7.2%
    • Free/Reduced Lunch 214,504 210,319 2.0%
    • English Learners 122,666 101,989 20.3%
    • African American 34,689 40,412 -14.2%
    • Asian 26,960 22,698 18.8%
    • Filipino 23,460 23,482 -0.1%
    • Latino 217,928 161,330 35.1%
    • White 169,581 205,025 -17.3%
    2007-08 1997-98 Change Source: California Department of Education
  • 4. San Diego County’s Changing Student Population
  • 5. Ethnic Shift: Schools Increasingly Diverse, Anglo Enrollment Declines 1990-91 52.4 7.9 5.1 4.9 28.2 1.5 1980-81 62.5 7.7 4.9 3.9 20.4 0.6 Percent of Enrollment Source: California Department of Education 2000-01 41.7 8.3 4.8 4.9 37.8 2.4 San Diego County Anglo African Am Asian Filipino Latino Other 2007-08 34.3 7.0 5.5 4.7 44.1 4.3 1970-71 78.9 6.0 1.2 1.6 12.0 0.3
  • 6. Ethnic Shift: Schools Increasingly Latino, Anglo Enrollment Declines
  • 7. California Statewide Enrollment
    • Source: http://dq.cde.ca.gov/dataquest
    Percent of Enrollment 3.1 0.8 NA Other 0.8 0.9 0.9 Amer Indian/ Native Alask 2.7 2.5 2.4 Filipino 0.6 0.7 0.6 Pacific Islander 8.2 8.0 8.1 Asian 7.4 8.3 8.8 African American 48.7 45.2 40.5 Latino 28.5 33.7 38.8 White 2007-08 N=6,276,486 2002-03 N=6,244,732 1997-98 N=5,727,303
  • 8. California’s Ethnic Shift
    • California Budget Project: Budget Backgrounder, August, 2008.
    Percent of Population 3.3 2.7 Other 12.5 11.0 Asian 5.4 6.5 Afr American 41.4 32.4 Latino 37.4 47.3 White 2020 39 to 43 million estimated 2000 33,871,648
  • 9. Latino Enrollment SD County
    • San Diego Unified 58,307 131,626 44.3% 21.3%
    • Sweetwater UHSD 30,859 42,662 72.3% 51.5%
    • Chula Vista ESD 17,842 27,251 65.5% 47.7%
    • Vista Unified 14,102 27,006 52.2% 45.2%
    • Escondido Elem. 12,631 19,445 65.0% 46.8%
    • Oceanside Unified 11,394 21,229 53.7% 31.3%
    • San Marcos Unified 8,276 17,380 47.6% 61.8%
    • Grossmont UHSD 6,775 24,196 28.0% 65.7%
    • South Bay Union 6,414 8,147 78.7% -4.7%
    • Cajon Valley 5,334 16,295 32.7% 28.3%
    • Escondido High 5,034 9,320 54.0% 84.5%
    • National 4,837 5,900 82.0% -0.1%
    • La Mesa-Spring Valley 4,590 13,072 35.1% 28.3%
    • San Diego County 217,928 494,016 44.1% 35.1%
    • California 3,058,108 6,276,486 48.7% 31.9%
    2007-08 Total Enrollment 2007-08 Latino Enrollment Source: California Department of Education, DataQuest Latino Growth 1998-2008 2007-08 Percent Latino Enrollment
  • 10. Latino Enrollment in SD County
  • 11. Portrait of SD County Educators (2007-08) 15.3% of teachers are Latino 17.7% of administrators are Latino 17.2% of pupil services personnel are Latino 75.7% of all teachers are Anglo 73.6% of all teachers are female 13.5 average teaching experience in years 48.0% of teachers have masters degrees or higher (compared to 36.3% in California) 10.6% are first and second-year teachers Source: California Dept. of Education
  • 12. Latino Staffing in Local Districts
    • SD Unified 1,094 14.9% 155 19.6% 122 13.7%
    • Sweetwater 633 33.4% 52 43.7% 111 44.9%
    • Chula Vista 436 30.6% 29 37.7% 25 22.5%
    • Vista Unified 159 12.0% 8 7.3% 13 12.9%
    • Escondido USD 148 14.0% 10 15.9% 5 10.9%
    • Oceanside 133 11.9% 10 17.2% 13 15.5%
    • San Marcos 87 10.4% 2 3.5% 13 18.8%
    • South Bay 190 46.0% 10 35.7% 18 37.5%
    • Grossmont 84 8 .0% 6 7.3% 12 11.7%
    • Cajon Valley 92 10.8% 8 15.4% 6 7.7%
    • Escondido High 37 9.3% 5 13.9% 13 31.0%
    • National 133 48.5% 10 47.6% 15 36.6%
    • La Mesa-Spring Valley 73 10.1% 3 5.8% 8 12.3%
    • SD County 3,842 15.3% 372 17.7% 436 17.2%
    • California 50,051 16.1% 5 ,070 17.7% 4,8 70 16.1%
    Source: California Department of Education *Counselors, psychologists, nurses, librarians, etc. Number of Latino Admin. Number of Latino Teachers Percent Latino Pupil Serv.* in Dist. Percent Latino Admin. in District Percent Latino Teachers in Dist. Number of Latino Pupil Services* San Diego County (2007-08)
  • 13. English Learners Increase 20.3%
    • Spanish 105,136 85,299 23.3
    • Tagalog 3,336 3,070 8.7
    • Vietnamese 2,731 3,068 -11.0
    • Somali 1,264 n/a n/a
    • Arabic 1,028 685 50.1
    • Korean 950 517 83.8
    • Japanese 741 535 38.5
    • Chaldean 624 501 24.6
    • Mandarin 602 309 94.8
    • Other languages 6,254 8,005 -21.9
    • Total 122,666 101,989 20.3
    2007-08 1997-98 Change Language Source: California Department of Education, Spring 2008 Language Census San Diego County
  • 14. English Learners in San Diego County by Language Source: 2008 R-30 Language Census 2007-2008
  • 15. Most English Learners Are Taught in English San Diego Unified 38,819 1,791 4.6% 17,137 19,891 Sweetwater UHSD 10,874 1,238 11.4% 5,215 4,421 Chula Vista ESD 9,938 1,688 17.0% 5,136 3,114 Vista Unified 7,477 168 2.2% 4,153 3,156 Escondido Elem. 8,714 821 9.4% 2,814 5,079 Oceanside Unified 5,570 0 0% 2,329 3,241 San Marcos Unified 4,347 219 5.0% 4,119 9 South Bay Union 3,889 1,234 31.7% 2,198 457 Grossmont UHSD 2,327 0 0% 1,491 836 Cajon Valley 4,267 588 13.8% 1,613 2,066 Escondido High 1,554 0 0% 1459 95 National 3,867 1,103 28.5% 102 2,662 La Mesa-Spring Valley 2,877 258 9.0% 1,739 880 San Diego County 122,666 10,644 8.7% 58,241 53,781 California 1,553,091 80,405 5.2% 755,966 716,720 Number in Bilingual Programs* Number of English Learners Source: California Dept. of Education, SD County Office of Education * Students receive ELD and some academic subjects through primary language Number In Main-stream English Percent in Bilingual Programs 2007-08 Number in Structured English Immersion
  • 16. Grade 2 65 34 35 64 36 36 Grade 3 56 25 26 57 27 26 Grade 4 71 39 40 72 45 46 Grade 5 65 32 33 69 38 38 Grade 6 61 31 32 67 35 37 Grade 7 63 34 35 66 37 38 Grade 8 57 28 29 61 33 35 Grade 9 61 32 35 64 35 38 California Standards Test English/Language Arts *EO/ Fluent San Diego County Percent Proficient and Advanced Latino Low Income** Source: California Department of Education (Sept. 2007) *EO = English only **Socioeconomically Disadvantaged San Diego County 2007 2008 *EO/ Fluent Low Income** Latino
  • 17. California Standards Test English/Language Arts San Diego County Percent Proficient and Advanced Source: California Department of Education (Sept. 2008) *EO = English only
  • 18. Grade 2 73 50 51 73 51 52 Grade 3 72 49 51 74 53 54 Grade 4 71 47 48 74 52 53 Grade 5 64 38 38 67 42 43 Grade 6 56 31 32 60 33 35 Grade 7 53 29 31 56 33 34 Grade 8 30 14 15 32 16 16 Algebra** California Standards Test Mathematics EO/ Fluent San Diego County Percent Proficient and Advanced Latino Low Income* Source: California Department of Education (Sept. 2007) *Socioeconomically Disadvantaged **Number of 8th graders scoring proficient/advanced in Algebra I divided by number of 8th graders tested in Algebra I and General Math combined. San Diego County 2007 2008 EO/ Fluent Low Income* Latino
  • 19. California Standards Test Mathematics San Diego County Percent Proficient and Advanced Source: California Department of Education (Sept. 2008) *EO = English only
  • 20. Cajon Valley 59.3 29.0 36.0 58.1 36.5 38.9 Chula Vista 69.9 37.4 47.5 74.4 49.4 56.1 Escondido Elem 68.1 27.4 30.7 67.7 34.0 35.9 Fallbrook Elem 71.0 26.1 35.7 67.4 31.5 39.9 La Mesa-SV 67.2 31.7 39.6 67.4 43.6 46.6 Lemon Grove 55.7 27.8 35.9 55.6 35.5 39.4 National 53.1 33.5 36.4 62.6 50.5 50.3 San Ysidro 63.3 27.4 32.6 57.0 45.0 46.8 South Bay 58.5 23.5 31.3 63.2 38.9 43.6 AYP Target 35.2 37.0 English Learners* AYP Percent Proficient White White ELEMENTARY DISTRICTS Based on 2008 California Standards Test English Learners* Latino Latino Source: California Dept. of Education *EL subgroup includes R-FEP students English/ Language Arts Mathematics
  • 21. Cajon Valley 11 18 38 27 06 Chula Vista 14 16 35 26 09 Encinitas 11 17 34 25 14 Escondido Elem 07 15 37 32 09 Fallbrook Elem 07 16 36 33 08 La Mesa-SV 10 14 36 30 10 Lemon Grove 05 17 37 31 10 National 19 20 35 20 06 San Ysidro 23 20 33 21 04 South Bay 24 22 35 16 03 Early Intermediate English Proficiency San Diego County Early Advanced Beginning ELEMENTARY DISTRICTS Annual Assessment Results Percent at each 2007-2008 CELDT level Advanced Intermediate Source: California Dept. of Education
  • 22. Escondido 77.0 36.2 40.5 72.8 38.1 40.4 Grossmont 65.3 22.7 39.1 64.7 31.1 42.3 Sweetwater 67.3 31.2 43.1 61.9 36.1 42.6 AYP Target 33.4 32.2 English Learners* AYP Percent Proficient White White Based on 2008 California Standards Test and California High School Exit Exam English Learners* Latino Latino Source: California Dept. of Education *EL subgroup includes R-FEP students English/ Language Arts Mathematics HIGH SCHOOL DISTRICTS UNIFIED DISTRICTS Oceanside 66.2 25.3 35.7 69.2 38.8 46.0 San Diego 74.1 29.9 34.8 71.3 39.0 40.0 San Marcos 77.8 39.3 44.3 76.5 47.8 49.4 Vista 72.7 27.2 35.8 75.2 37.6 43.9 California 66.5 24.2 34.8 65.0 38.5 40.0 AYP Target 34.0 34.6
  • 23. Escondido 10 15 40 30 04 Grossmont 06 17 40 32 06 Sweetwater 08 14 37 35 06 Source: California Dept. of Education HIGH SCHOOL DISTRICTS UNIFIED DISTRICTS Oceanside 09 20 39 27 05 San Diego 10 19 40 25 06 San Marcos 08 16 36 30 10 Vista 08 18 41 27 05 California 09 17 39 28 08 English Proficiency San Diego County Percent of ELs at each 2007-2008 CELDT level Early Intermediate Early Advanced Beginning Advanced Intermediate
  • 24. Special Education Enrollment San Diego County, 2007-2008
    • Afr. Amer. 34,689 5,885 7.0% 10.0% 1.42
    • Asian 26,960 1,791 5.5% 3.0% 0.55
    • Filipino 23,460 1,522 4.7% 2.6% 0.55
    • Latino 217,928 26,652 44.1% 45.3% 1.03
    • White 169,581 21,978 34.3% 37.4% 1.09
    Source: California Department of Education Ethnic Group Special Education Enrollment Percent of Special Ed. Enrollment K-12 Enrollment Percent of K-12 Enrollment Representation Ratio
  • 25. Special Education Services by Ethnicity and Disability San Diego County, 2007-2008 Mental = retardation, autism, brain injury Physical = hearing loss, deaf, visual impairment, orthopedic, health, blind + deaf
  • 26. Special Education Staffing to Serve English Learners Source: CSDE Special Education Division: 2005-06 611 30,575 300,209 317,590 683,178 6,312,103 California 141 2,821 27,882 24,746 57,728 495,228 San Diego County 32 1,189 7,555 6,035 16,004 132,482 San Diego Unified K-12 18 233 2,211 3,260 4,618 41,865 Sweetwater 7-12 11 134 1,405 2,053 2,991 26,472 Chula Vista K-6 Bil-Sped Education Teachers Special Education Teachers Total Teachers Latino in Special Education Students in Special Education Enrollment District
  • 27. Representation in GATE San Diego County 2007-2008
  • 28. Latino Representation in GATE San Diego County School Districts 2007-2008
  • 29. Latino Representation in GATE San Diego County School Districts 2007-2008
  • 30. “ a thru g” Completion Rates 06-07 29,572 11,791 39.9 35.5 05-06 29,208 11,223 38.4 35.8 04-05 29,069 10,808 37.2 35.2 03-04 28,383 10,618 37.4 33.7 02-03 28,658 10,123 35.3 33.5 01-02 27,313 10,189 37.3 34.7 00-01 26,158 10,073 38.5 35.6 99-00 25,681 9,523 37.1 34.8 98-99 24,472 9,116 37.3 35.6 97-98 23,083 9,149 39.6 36.6 96-97 21,818 8,282 38.0 36.0 95-96 20,956 7,285 34.8 35.3 94-95 20,464 7,325 35.8 34.9 93-94 20,380 5,994 29.4 32.2 Source: California Dept. of Education SD County “ a thru g” Rate Year SD County High School Graduates Number “ a thru g” Completers California “ a thru g” Rate Percent of high school grads completing the 15 year-long courses required for UC/CSU admission with a “C” or better in each course
  • 31. “ a thru g” Completion Rates by Ethnicity
    • Af Am 2,075 27.1 25.3 23.5 25.6 21.4 21.7 24.9
    • Asian 1,802 60.0 59.4 58.8 53.6 55.0 57.8 58.5
    • Filipino 1,664 51.9 50.4 50.7 51.3 45.7 51.7 49.9
    • Latino 10,159 26.8 25.9 22.0 22.9 20.1 21.7 23.3
    • Am. Ind. 261 28.0 24.5 22.9 20.9 24.0 25.6 25.4
    • Pac. Is. 278 31.7 27.7 27.8 28.0 21.8 30.2 31.2
    • White 12,943 48.3 46.0 46.7 45.7 44.5 45.5 46.0
    • Total 29,572 39.9 38.4 37.2 37.4 35.3 37.3 38.5
    Source: California Dept. of Education 01-02 04-05 UC/CSU Rate 2006-07 Total Graduates San Diego County UC/CSU Rate UC/CSU Rate UC/CSU Rate 05-06 UC/CSU Rate 00-01 UC/CSU Rate UC/CSU Rate 02-03 03-04 06-07
  • 32. “ a - g” Completion Rates by Ethnicity San Diego County
  • 33. “ a thru g” Completion Rates for Latino Students
    • San Diego USD 28.9 25.5 24.2 24.6 22.9 23.2 23.8
    • Sweetwater UHSD 29.8 30.9 23.1 21.5 22.0 25.7 25.4
    • Vista USD 12.7 11.4 8.5 17.6 8.4 10.8 10.4
    • Oceanside USD 18.2 21.0 22.9 16.7 16.9 14.0 19.1
    • San Marcos USD 29.6 32.1 25.9 24.0 26.3 27.7 24.6
    • Grossmont UHSD 29.1 27.5 26.7 37.0 20.9 20.5 26.8
    • Escondido UHSD 20.8 21.7 17.6 16.3 17.6 11.3 14.2
    • SD County 26.8 25.9 22.0 22.9 20.1 21.7 23.3
    • California 25.2 25.5 24.0 21.7 21.5 21.8 22.9
    Source: California Department of Education 01-02 02-03 00-01 04-05 05-06 06-07 San Diego County Percent of Latino graduates completing courses required for UC/CSU admission 03-04
  • 34. “ a thru g” Completion Rates for Latino Students San Diego County Percent of Latinos completing courses required for UC/CSU admission
  • 35. CA High School Exit Exam
    • African Am 2,938 2,451 69%
    • Am. Indian 370 330 76%
    • Asian 2,092 2,034 95%
    • Filipino 2,050 1,953 92%
    • Latino 18,103 16,439 73%
    • Pac. Island 379 356 85%
    • White 14,496 13,581 93%
    • Total 40,998 37,583 82%
    Source: California Department of Education Percent Passed of Tested Total Grade 10 Enrolled 10th Grade Results from Combined 2008 Testing 2,557 74% 337 79% 2,041 92% 1,955 91% 16,664 71% 358 84% 13,745 93% 38,105 82% Percent Passed of Tested Grade 10 Tested Grade 10 Tested San Diego County 2007-08 Math English
  • 36. CAHSEE English Sub-Test Passing by Ethnicity
  • 37. CAHSEE Math Sub-Test Passing by Ethnicity
  • 38. CAHSEE by Student Designation
    • Special Education 2,768 46%
    • English Learners 6,043 49%
    • Reclassified (R-FEP) 6,716 91%
    • Low-income 15,079 69%
    • Not Low-income 18,580 91%
    • Total 37,583 82%
    Source: California Department of Education Percent Passed of Tested 10th Grade Results from Combined 2008 Testing 3,210 44% 6,191 37% 6,739 92% 15,359 69% 18,742 92% 38,105 82% Percent Passed English Grade 10 Tested Grade 10 Tested English San Diego County 2007-08 Math English
  • 39. Advanced Placement Qualifying Rates
    • 06-07 76,936 24,898 32.4 23.2
    • 05-06 73,093 21,474 29.4 20.0
    • 04-05 69,867 20,690 29.6 21.3
    • 03-04 67,512 18,699 27.7 20.3
    • 02-03 66,696 17,768 26.6 19.2
    • 01-02 63,224 16,739 26.5 18.6
    • 00-01 62,360 14,893 23.9 17.5
    • 99-00 59,949 12,288 20.5 15.8
    • 98-99 57,786 10,762 18.6 14.8
    • 97-98 55,314 9,781 17.7 13.4
    • 96-97 51,964 8,775 16.9 13.1
    • 95-96 49,689 7,682 15.5 12.1
    SD County Qualifying Rate Year Sources: College Board, San Diego County Office of Ed. AP Exams Earning College Credit Per 100 Juniors and Seniors Grade 11-12 Enrollment Number 3+ AP Exams California Qualifying Rate
  • 40. AP Qualifying Rates by Ethnicity San Diego County Public Schools (2005-06)
    • African Am 349 5,370 6.5 4.2
    • Am. Indian 97 713 13.6 8.8
    • Asian 4,434 8,307 53.4 33.5
    • Latino 4,043 27,737 14.6 14.9
    • Latino
    • ( w/o AP Sp. Lang. ) 2,203 27,737 7.9 6.7
    • White 10,204 29,965 34.1 25.0
    • Total 21,474 73,093 29.4 23.9
    Source: College Board; San Diego County Office of Education Asian includes Filipino and Pacific Islander / Not included: Not Stated; Other Grade 11-12 Enrollment Number of 3+ AP Exams AP Rate 2005-06 AP Rate 2000-01
  • 41. Graduation Rates San Diego County, 2007 8th and 9th Grade Enrollment Compared to 12th Grade Graduates
    • Am. Indian 338 510 261 77% 51%
    • Af Am 3,105 3,370 2,075 67% 62%
    • Asian 1,856 1,983 1,802 97% 91%
    • Filipino 1,877 2,137 1,664 89% 78%
    • Latino 14,591 16,450 10,159 70% 62%
    • Pac. Is. 322 386 278 86% 72%
    • White 15,838 16,854 12,943 82% 77%
    • Total 38,149 41,945 29,572 78% 71%
    Source: California Department of Education High School Graduates June 2007 Ethnic Group Enrollment Oct. ‘02 8th Grade 5-Year Grad Rate (8-12) Enrollment Oct. ‘03 9th Grade 4-Year Grad Rate (9-12)
  • 42. 4-Year Graduation Rates San Diego County Time Series 9th Grade Enrollment Compared to 12th Grade Graduates
    • Am. Indian 64% 66% 59% 51% 51%
    • Afr. American 65% 59% 61% 61% 61%
    • Asian 88% 94% 88% 90% 91%
    • Filipino 90% 89% 88% 78% 78%
    • Latino 66% 63% 65% 62% 62%
    • Pac. Islander 73% 79% 73% 72% 72%
    • White 79% 77% 78% 78% 77%
    • Total 74% 72% 72% 71% 71%
    Source: California Department of Education Ethnic Group 4-Year Grad Rate 2006 4-Year Grad Rate 2005 4-Year Grad Rate 2004 4-Year Grad Rate 2003 4-Year Grad Rate 2007
  • 43. 4-Year Graduation Rates San Diego County Time Series 9th Grade Enrollment Compared to 12th Grade Graduates
  • 44. Latino Graduation Rates by District, San Diego County, 2007 San Diego Unified 3,967 4,324 1,926 49% 45% Sweetwater Union 4,180 5,426 3,741 89% 69% Grossmont High n/a 1,667 992 n/a 60% Escondido High n/a 1,093 708 n/a 65% Oceanside Unified 739 757 455 62% 60% San Marcos Unified 444 463 358 81% 77% San Diego County 14,591 16,450 10,159 70% 62% District Source: California Department of Education High School Graduates June 2007 Enrollment Oct. 02 8th Grade 5-Year Grad Rate (8-12) Enrollment Oct. 03 9th Grade 4-Year Grad Rate (9-12)
  • 45. 4-Year Latino Graduation Rates Time Series by District, San Diego County San Diego Unified 52% 59% 47% 47% 45% Sweetwater Union 68% 74% 74% 67% 69% Grossmont High 56% 62% 57% 55% 60% Escondido High 58% 74% 67% 64% 65% Oceanside Unified 55% 64% 61% 62% 60% San Marcos Unified 59% 69% 70% 65% 77% San Diego County 66% 72% 65% 62% 62% District Source: California Department of Education 2006 2005 2004 2003 2007
  • 46. 4-Year Latino Graduation Rates Time Series by District, San Diego County
  • 47. SAT Critical Reading by Ethnicity 2006 501 450 455 538 506 2005 497 454 460 543 511 2004 490 449 453 538 508 2003 486 432 449 542 505 2002 479 440 445 536 499 2001 484 444 452 539 503 2000 474 434 457 537 501 1999 474 442 458 536 501 1998 473 435 454 532 497 1997 475 444 454 537 501 1996 468 439 454 535 499 1995 471 428 453 532 497 1994 470 431 450 534 498 1993 464 434 451 533 497 S ources: College Board, California Dept. of Education San Diego County Latino Year Asian African American White Total
  • 48. SAT Verbal Scores by Ethnicity San Diego County 1990-2006
  • 49. SAT Math Scores by Ethnicity 2006 546 440 467 551 523 2005 534 450 473 555 527 2004 528 446 466 550 524 2003 529 428 464 555 523 2002 524 441 462 551 519 2001 531 444 467 551 521 2000 524 440 471 551 521 1999 512 440 469 545 515 1998 518 439 469 545 516 1997 519 440 468 543 515 1996 512 435 464 540 512 1995 514 427 463 536 509 1994 513 432 459 535 508 1993 514 439 463 534 509 S ource: College Board; California Dept. of Education San Diego County Latino Year Asian African American White Total
  • 50. SAT Math Scores by Ethnicity San Diego County 1990-2006
  • 51. College Going Rates by Ethnicity San Diego County Public High School Graduates in California IHEs (2007)
    • African Am 2,009 562 355 770 56.0%
    • Asian/P-I 2,062 1,169 708 711 68.8%
    • Filipino 1,657 864 590 712 78.6%
    • Latino 10,027 2,725 1,427 4,420 58.3%
    • White 12,802 6,254 2,423 3,571 46.8%
    • Total 29,189 11,788 6,043 11,788 58.6%
    Source: California Postsecondary Education Commission Asian includes Pacific Islander 2007 A - G Completions 2007 High School Graduates Frosh University Enrollment Estimated College Going Rate Frosh Comm Coll Enrollment
  • 52. Enrollment by Ethnicity in Local Community Colleges Asian Latino African American SD County Time Series Source: Local community college districts White Filipino Total 2006 10,791 14,104 8,786 49,499 67,763 169,729 2005 10,496 13,790 8,789 47,462 67,784 166,917 . 2004 11,273 14,210 8,837 56,863 79,131 190,174 2003 11,083 13,413 8,088 49,942 70,553 169,468 2002 12,004 14,788 8,932 55,502 86,788 197,269 2001 10,994 12,680 7,602 46,238 75,625 187,398 2000 11,737 12,376 7,916 43,133 79,532 182,561 Year
  • 53. Enrollment by Ethnicity in Local Community Colleges SD County Time Series
  • 54. Undergraduate Enrollment - Fall 2006 San Diego Community College District 47,120 TOTAL 12.1% 5,723 Multiple/No Response 37.7% 17,780 White 8.4% 3,972 African American 21.6% 10,168 Latino 6.3% 2,954 Filipino 1.3% 612 Pacific Islander 11.6% 5,477 Asian 0.9% 434 American Indian Percent Count Ethnicity
  • 55. 2005 Transfer Rate by Ethnicity San Diego Community College District 40.2% 7.1% 23.5% 9.6% All Students 32.0% 4.9% 21.3% 5.8% Latino 28.3% 10.4% 14.6% 3.3% African American 48.2% 6.5% 30.2% 11.5% Filipino 39.9% 7.5% 24.5% 7.9% White 52.0% 6.6% 23.9% 21.5% Asian / P.I. All Institutions Private/Out of State CSU UC
  • 56. IHE Enrollment by Ethnicity Asian Latino African American Community College Districts and Universities SD County Spring 2005 Source: California Postsecondary Education Commission Asian includes Pacific Islander White Filipino Total Chancellor’s Office 2,441 3,659 810 10,387 9,919 28,889 Grossmont- Cuyamaca 1,724 1,239 941 4,505 14,096 27,631 Miracosta 487 700 322 3,443 7,233 13,408 Palomar 902 1,471 875 7,677 15,939 29,870 San Diego 3,941 6,026 3,122 9,498 17,585 46,504 Southwestern 1,001 695 2,719 11,952 3,012 20,615 CSUSM 233 370 376 1,494 3,846 7,502 SDSU 1,237 2,602 2,107 6,769 14,711 32,693 UCSD 346 8,686 1,107 2,504 9,110 25,938
  • 57. San Diego State University Undergraduate Enrollment - Fall 2006 3.0% 825 Southeast Asian 27,883 TOTAL 12.4% 3,456 Multiple/No Response 45.6% 12,716 White 4.2% 1,171 African American 21.3% 5,936 Latino 7.5% 2,078 Filipino 0.9% 248 Pacific Islander 4.5% 1,254 Asian 0.7% 199 American Indian Percent Count Ethnicity
  • 58. CSU System Continuation and Graduation Rates First Time Freshmen Latino and White Student Comparison Source: www.asd.calstate.edu/csrde/index.shtml
  • 59. California Latino Higher Education Pipeline Construct Based on 2005 Data
    • California Postsecondary
    • Education Commission (2005)
    328 High School Graduates 539 9th Grade Students 17 CSU Graduates 9 UC Graduates 16 18 Transfer 2 26 California State University 63 California Community College 11 University of California 100 First Time Freshmen
  • 60. U.S. Educational Pipeline by Race, Ethnicity and Gender, 2000
    • Note: First/Second number in each box: Female/Male Source: U.S. Bureau of the Census, 2000
    1.4/4.4 Graduate with Doctorate 0.6/1.4 Graduate with Doctorate 0.3/0.5 Graduate with Doctorate 0.4/0.6 Graduate with Doctorate 0.3/0.4 Graduate with Doctorate 13/22 Graduate from Graduate School 8/11 Graduate from Graduate School 5/4 Graduate from Graduate School 4/4 Graduate from Graduate School 4/4 Graduate from Graduate School 40/48 Graduate from College 24/28 Graduate from College 15/13 Graduate from College 12/11 Graduate from College 11/10 Graduate from College 78/83 Graduate from High School 84/83 Graduate from High School 73/71 Graduate from High School 72/70 Graduate from High School 54/51 Graduate from High School 100/100 Elementary School Students 100/100 Elementary School Students 100/100 Elementary School Students 100/100 Elementary School Students 100/100 Elementary School Students ASIAN AMERICAN WHITES AFRICAN AMERICAN NATIVE AMERICANS LATINO/S
  • 61. California Prison and Civilian Population Percent by Ethnicity Source: California Department of Corrections, California Department of Finance
  • 62. U.S. “Status” Dropout Rate by Family Income Status dropouts: 16-24 year olds not enrolled in school who did not complete a high school program. Figures do not include those incarcerated. Source: http://nces.ed.gov/programs/digest/
  • 63. U.S. Education Attainment Highest Level Achieved, 2005 Ages 18-65 Source: http://nces.ed.gov/programs/digest/ Some College Ethnicity Not High School Graduates High School Graduates Bachelor’s Advanced Degree Latino 40.8 28.5 15.2 7.4 2.9 Black 19.7 36.7 20.6 11.2 4.4 White 10.7 32.5 19.8 18.6 9.6
  • 64. U. S. Education Attainment Highest Level Achieved, 2005 Ages 18-65
  • 65. U.S. Median Income by Education Level, 2004 Source: National Center for Education Statistics, 2006 Some College Not High School Graduates High School Graduates Bachelor’s Master’s Degree 18,874 26,104 30,610 42,087 51,733
  • 66.
    • California Standards
    • Test (CST) scores
    • data1.cde.ca.gov/dataquest
    • SAT and AP test results
    • data1.cde.ca.gov/dataquest
    • Ethnicity, enrollment and graduation
    • data1.cde.ca.gov/dataquest
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