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How To Be Effective
 

How To Be Effective

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  • How is everyone tonight. Big Day! Have fun? Learning a lot? I’m want to talk to you tonight about effectiveness, specifically: methods, strategies and tips that will help you be effective trainers But also: How the principles of effective training can also apply in other areas of your life You can apply these ideas/principles to be an effective leader And to simply live your life more effectively. Effectiveness Key Points: Begin with the end in mind Align your thoughts and behaviors toward your goal Evaluate and adapt as necessary Presenting Key Points Formatting Matters Questions Engage Answer: What’s in it for them
  • Why you should care You tell me. I assume you’re all here at TTT to become better trainers. But I don’t want to assume anything. Why are you here? What did you hope to get out of this experience? Why I care Life is short I want to use my time here to make a difference
  • Effectiveness: Bringing about the change you desire
  • Bringing about the change you desire By beginning with the end in mind
  • To be Effective is to Bring About the Change you desire by Beginning with the end in mind And aligning all your actions toward that goal That Sounds Simple Right??? So how come more us aren’t doing this consistently?
  • I think the missing piece that leads to greater success is having a practice of continual evaluation We forget to revisit our goals and see if our thoughts/actions are aligned. We Forget to evaluate whether our choices are moving us forward. We lose focus Let me tell you what I mean by a practice of continual evaluation
  • Let me tell you what I mean by continual evaluation Asking these questions Consistently Adapting as necessary. What’s working What’s not working What can I do differently? One of my goals tonight is to help you see the value of consistently asking yourself these questions, so that you will begin asking it on a regular basis.
  • I believe, and it is my experience, that if you develop the habit of asking this “What is my goal, and are my thoughts/actions aligned with it?) You will create/deliver better trainings/presentations Use less energy too do so More easily create the changes you want to see in your organizations More easily create the changes you want to see in your lives The challenge is to find a way to remember . To ritualize the behavior of evaluation To repeat the behavior until it becomes a habit Find a way that works for you QUESTION: WHAT HAS WORKED FOR YOU? How do you remember? Answer : I set reminders on Google calendar and tape things to my bulletin board
  • Now again while this workshop focuses on training, I want to point out that the principles that underlie effective training are the same principles that underlie Effective Leadership. In short: Strategic thinking QUESTION: What is strategic thinking? Solicit answers ANSWER: As a result of X I want Y to happen. What choices can I make that move me closer to my goal? I believe that good trainers and good leaders share a similar skill set and way of approaching a problem or task.
  • To be a good trainer and a good leader , it is also necessary that you have some basic understanding of people
  • Specifically: Ways in which we are the same and Ways in which we are different . For right now, let’s look at ways in which we are the same. Now most of us aren’t quite as the same as these two who share the same DNA and the same upbringing But as human beings we do share something in common [click]
  • BUT… We all have one of these. All of our brains are basically wired/coded in the same way Coding may be differ culture to culture But we basically process information in similar ways Particularly the way we process written information visually
  • The brain likes H E A D L I N E S Readable Fonts Formatting Indents Lists Colors
  • Use headlines to grab and focus attention . QUESTION: WHAT DO HEADLINES DO???
  • Choose your font for readability San Serif is generally considered more readable on screen I think it’s generally more readable in print too. Consider using: Verdana Arial/Helvetica Tahoma Trebuchet
  • Subheadings and indents help the brain process information quickly by suggesting relationships.
  • Use Color to draw attention and increase engagement Use: Bolding/italicize/underline to emphasize Use lists to suggests relationships and improve scanability QUESTION: Why might you choose to use numbers instead of bullets?
  • The B r a i n likes c o l o r The Brain Sees yellow first Makes text more readable Improves retention Lastly, remember our first slide, and consider breaking paragraphs up into smaller units even if it’s not grammatically correct. (is it our goal a gold star in grammar or that anyone can read and understand what we’ve written?)
  • I believe that the formatting of your materials should be guided by your ultimate goal . So what happens when you lose track of your goal ? Let’s watch So what was their goal? Were they successful in achieving it? Why not? What could they have done differently?
  • LET’S REVIEW! Effectiveness means bringing about the________you desire Continually evaluate by asking What is___________? Increase readability and retention by using these formatting techniques:________________
  • Ok, so far we’ve been focusing on General effectiveness Formatting of materials. Let’s look at some effective presentation strategies .
  • Why use questions? Possible answers Engage the audience (no sleep) Respect adult learning principles Draw on hive mind The 10 steps to asking questions so you get an answer every time http://www.speakingaboutpresenting.com/audience/asking-questions-audience/#more-2197 Warm up your audience first Don’t let them settle into a passive mode Move from easy to more challenging questions through your presentation Signal Your Question Frame your question so that people know exactly what you want Ask your question slowly and clearly Make it easy for people to answer Wait for answers Use the answers you get Do not humiliate anyone
  • Bad Questions=Bad answers
  • Good Questions are: Not too easy Not too hard Just right
  • For example, say I was giving a presentation on “ Overcoming your fear of public speaking ” I could use this matrix to come up with progressively more challenging questions. I would start with questions from the bottom-left corner. These are easy questions which will get me and my audience on a roll. But if I only asked questions like this they would soon become trite and boring . So as you move through your presentation move towards the top-right corner and ask more challenging questions which will get your audience thinking . Questions Tips Use them to warm up your audience first (where you from?) Don’t let them settle into a passive mode (let them know they’re part of the show) Move from easy to more challenging questions through your presentation Signal/Frame Your Question (so they don’t think it’s rhetorical) Ask your question slowly and clearly Make it easy for people to answer Wait for answers Use the answers you get Do not humiliate anyone
  • And speaking of asking questions
  • Effective Training answers the question: What’s in it for them?
  • Variations on the theme of: LEARN THIS BECAUSE IT WILL HELP YOU KICK ASS
  • Important to know your audience (and people) because you need to craft message: what’s in it for them
  • What are some ways in which people differ that might affect our choices as trainers… Possible answers Cultural background Learning Styles Education level Personality style More
  • People have Different learning styles Craft your training to appeal to those who learn by Watching Listening Doing
  • How might an awareness of personality styles affect our choices as trainers?
  • Brief commentary, then click to show “let’s do it together.”
  • When developing and presenting your training it’s important to take into account that People have: Different learning styles Different personality styles STRATEGIES: Necessary to talk “around the DISC” Appeal to those who learn by Reflecting Watching Listening Doing, and Doing together (today’s gen Y) Recommend MBTI DISC Enneagram
  • OK, we’re going to do another exercise; Let’s get into groups again and then we can review the instructions Please count off (1-5) Pass out golden rod handouts Going to ask you to look at your class topic and list Key ideas for the workshop What’s in it for them (list many circle top 3) Three objectives (list many circle 3) Three questions you can ask Review the SCUBA Class example (or have them review it on their own Who wants to time: 7: 52 seconds on the clock. Any questions? And go…. Debrief: Go through each
  • Since “effective training” is ultimately about bringing about a change in participants (feeling, thought or belief) It’s helpful to understand a bit about what motivates people to change (or not change) Look at these two posters The on the left says “smoking kills” The one on the right says “more doctors smoke camels” Take a guess—just for fun: How effective do you think this one (smoking kills is) Howe effective do you think this one is (doctors smoke) Here’s the mind-blower: research suggests that they are equally effective: in stimulating a desire to smoke!
  • Each subject lay in the scanner for about an hour while we projected on a small screen a series of cigarette package labels from various countries — including statements like “smoking kills” and “smoking causes fatal lung cancers.” We found that the warnings prompted no blood flow to the amygdala , the part of the brain that registers alarm, or to the part of the cortex that would be involved in any effort to register disapproval. To the contrary, the warning labels backfired : they stimulated (you guessed it) the nucleus accumbens , sometimes called the “craving spot,” which lights up on f.M.R.I. whenever a person craves something, whether it’s alcohol, drugs, tobacco or gambling. study has already revealed an unintended consequence of antismoking health warnings. They appear to work mainly as a marketing tool to keep smokers smoking.
  • "Change or Die": By Alan Deutschman. Statistics don't motivate people to change. Deutschman studied people who were facing death unless they changed to a more healthy life style (morbid obesity, heart problems.) He found that 9 out of ten will not change their lifestyle after coronary bypass or angioplasty surgery-even if their life depends on it. Amazingly, people won't even keep taking a pill which has a good chance of saving their life. A study of 37,000 patients who were prescribed statins found that nearly everyone took the pills for a month or two, Deutschman relates, but by the third month about half had stopped, and one year later only "one fifth to one third" were still taking the statins, "which they were supposed to keep taking for the rest of their lives.“ Facts and fear no matter how sound, don't work People with severe heart problems don't respond to statistics or fear. They respond to positive emotional motivation. This is internal
  • Change or Die: (the reasons we change) Book recommendation.
  • Two other books I highly recommend Predictably Irrational (how we make choices) Made to Stick (how we remember) This is your brain on music (but that has less training value unless you’re going to sing your lessons.)
  • It’s about creating meaning…
  • Quote “made to stick”
  • http://www.speakingaboutpresenting.com/design/powerpoint-slide-design-7-styles/
  • http://www.speakingaboutpresenting.com/design/powerpoint-slide-design-7-styles/
  • http://www.speakingaboutpresenting.com/design/powerpoint-slide-design-7-styles/

How To Be Effective How To Be Effective Presentation Transcript

  • How to be Effective
  • How to be Effective And why you should care
  • Effectiveness Bringing about the change you desire
  • Effectiveness Bringing about the change you desire By beginning with the end in mind
  • Bring about the change you desire Begin with the End in Mind Align all your actions toward that goal
  • Practice Continual Evaluation Are my actions moving me toward my goals?
  • What’s not Working? What Can I Do differently? What’s Working?
  • Power of Repetition Continual Evaluation
  • Effective Training = Effective Leadership Both are rooted in Strategic Thinking
  • Effective Training = Effective Leadership Both are rooted in Understanding People
  • Understanding People How we are the same How we are different
  • Understanding People How we are the same We all have one of these: A Brain
    • H E A D L I N E S
    • Readable Fonts
    • Formatting
      • Indents
      • Lists
      • Colors
    The Brain Likes
  • Use Headlines
  • Choose Your Fonts San Serif fonts are easier to read on screen Consider Using Verdana, Arial/Helvetica, Tahoma and Trebuchet
    • Subheadings and Indents help:
      • Focus ATTENTION
      • Increase SCANABILITY
      • Aid in RETENTION
    Choose Your Formatting
    • Use Color to draw attention
    • Use Bolding to emphasize
    • Use Lists for readability
            • George
            • John
            • Paul
            • Ringo
    Choose Your Formatting
  • Choose your colors
    • The B r a i n likes c o l o r
      • The Brain Sees yellow first
      • Makes text more readable
      • Improves retention
  • When formatting your materials Remember to ask: What is my goal? Watch: http://usedwigs.com/video-stop-sign-designed-by-committee/
  • Let’s Review
    • Effectiveness means bringing about the________you desire
    • Continually evaluate by asking What is___________?
    • Increase readability and retention by using these formatting techniques:________________
  • Effective Presentation Strategies
  • Good Use of questions
  • Bad Questions = Bad Answers
    • Yes
    • No
  • Good Questions are not too easy, not too hard They’re Just Right
  •  
  • And speaking of questions…
  • What’s in it for them? Effective Training Answers the Question:
  • Effective Training Answers the Question: What’s in it for them?
  • Depends who them is…. What’s in it for them?
  • Participants differ in many ways That may affect our choices as trainers
  • People have different Learning Styles Visual Auditory Kinesthetic
  • People have different Learning Styles
  • How we are different: Personality IS ES IN EN People have different Learning Styles
  • How we are different: Personality IS ES IN EN People have different Learning Styles FP
  • Exercise: What’s in it for them?
  • A few words regarding Why People Change
  • Why People Change How we are the same
  • Why People Change “ The study has already revealed an unintended consequence of antismoking health warnings. They appear to work mainly as a marketing tool to keep smokers smoking . ”
  • Why People Change Behavior changes in response to a positive emotional connection to what could be.
  • Understanding People By Alan Deutschman How we are the same
  • Understanding People How we are the same
  • Presentation Tips: Lightning Round
  • Humor helps the medicine go down
  • Choose Your Words
  • Choose Your Words
  • Have a Consistent Message
  • Have a Consistent Message
  • Don’t force the Content
  • Surprises are Engaging
  • Surprises are Engaging
  • Keep it Simple
  • Keep it Simple
  • Check Your Facts
  • Check Your Facts
  • Stay on top of the Research
  • Pass the BS Test
  • Quote the Experts
  • Quote the Experts
  • Quote the Experts
  • Inform, even advocate, but don’t Spin
  • Questions, comments, discussion? ?
  • ALWAYS Begin With the End in Mind Peter Bromberg NJ Train the Trainer March 18, 2009 Peterbromberg.com/ttt
    • Font slide: http://www.flickr.com/photos/befuddledsenses/2587678725/sizes/o/
    • Aye, Eye http://www.flickr.com/photos/cayusa/549883494/
    • Colored ring drops: http://www.flickr.com/photos/kounelli/2797656093/
    • Goalposts: http://www.flickr.com/photos/grahamb/3043227962/
    • Professor: http://www.flickr.com/photos/kloudjonas/3240282645/sizes/l/
    • Gears: http://www.flickr.com/photos/17258892@N05/2588347668/
    • Idea: http://www.flickr.com/photos/21313845@N04/3067569337/
    • Compass: http://www.flickr.com/photos/7542997@N03/2473782602/
    • 3D Team Arrow: http://www.flickr.com/photos/lumaxart/2137729430/
    • Kick ass: http://headrush.typepad.com/creating_passionate_users/2007/04/index.html
    • Little People: http://www.flickr.com/photos/gwen/1464734120/
    • Twins: http://www.flickr.com/photos/judybaxter/2272062328/
    • Sheep: http://www.flickr.com/photos/pasotraspaso/2561252664/
    • Eyes: http://www.flickr.com/photos/lanbui/81416656/
    • Ear: http://www.flickr.com/photos/chrisdonia/3328946023/
    • Hands: http://www.flickr.com/photos/dalydose/324264361/
    • Gift: http://www.flickr.com/photos/ginnerobot/3118868877/
    • Happy faces: http://www.flickr.com/photos/purrr/126597849/
    • Unacceptable Employee Behavior: http://www.flickr.com/photos/inju/2434655377/
    • I’m Thinking of…: http://www.flickr.com/photos/somemixedstuff/2403249501/
    • Optical Illusion art by Julian Bever. Photos from: http://justinmaier.com/2006/05/09/amazing-3d-art-by-julian-bever/
    • Let’s Review: http://www.flickr.com/photos/jek-a-go-go/2545104662/
    • Lightning Round: http://www.flickr.com/photos/jegomezr/2926143475/sizes/l/
    • Goldilocks: http://www.xanga.com/dextr/photos/da254125854461/
    • Baghead: http://www.flickr.com/photos/summerluu/2388805263
    • Delete Key: http://www.flickr.com/photos/virgu/12496426/sizes/l/
    • Other images from: http://web.mac.com/iajukes/thecommittedsardine/Funny_Stuff.html
    • 1957 Brownie Camera: http://www.flickr.com/photos/tanaka/2345575389/
    Image Credits
    • START HERE
    • Talk Good: Giving Effective Presentations (Pete’s link roundup) http://librarygarden.blogspot.com/2008/02/talk-good-giving-effective.html
    • ARTICLES/BLOG POSTS
    • 6 ways to take charge of what your audience remembers: http://www.speakingaboutpresenting.com/content/six-ways-to-take-charge-of-what-your-audience-remembers/
    • The 10 Second Rule: How to Write For Diagonal Readers: http://www.copyblogger.com/the-10-second-rule/
    • 10 steps to asking questions so you get an answer every time: http://www.speakingaboutpresenting.com/audience/asking-questions-audience/#more-2197
    • All Presenting is Persuasive: http://www.guilamuir.com/ideasource/2007/08/all-presenting-is-persuasive/
    • Change or Die: http://www.fastcompany.com/magazine/94/open_change-or-die.html
    • Information Overload : http://www.copyblogger.com/information-overload/
    • Inhaling Fear (NY Times article on smoking): http://www.nytimes.com/2008/12/12/opinion/12lindstrom.html?ref=opinion
    • Shorter is Better: http://www.copyblogger.com/shorter-is-better/
    • Top 7 Powerpoint slide designs : http://www.speakingaboutpresenting.com/design/powerpoint-slide-design-7-styles
    • BOOKS
    • Change or Die, by John Deutschman
    • The Enneagram Made Easy , by Renee Baron and Elizabeth Wagele
    • Leadership Simple, by Jill Morris and Steve Morris
    • Made to Stick, by Chip Heath and Dan Heath
    • Nine Ways of Working , by Michael J. Goldberg
    • Predictably Irrational, by Dan Ariely
    • Type Talk at Work , by Otto Kroeger, Janet Thuesen, Hile Rutledge
    Suggested Bibliography and Articles Referenced
  • Deleted Scenes
  • Effectiveness requires Continual Evaluation Do my actions Align With My Goals? Deleted Scenes
  • Powerpoint Design Options
      • Effective Powerpoint
      • Tells a story
      • Uses images to engage
      • Focuses on creating meaning not dumping information
    Deleted Scenes
    • Examples of Effective Powerpoint
    • The assertion-evidence slide
    • Classic Presentation Zen
    • The Lessig method
    • Duarte Design Diagrams
    • Ethos3 story-telling style
    Powerpoint Design Options Deleted Scenes
  • Simple — find the core of any idea Unexpected — grab people's attention by surprising them Concrete — make sure idea can be grasped & remembered Credibility — give an idea believability Emotion — help people see the importance of an idea Stories — empower people to use an idea through narrative Made to Stick Deleted Scenes