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7 - Momentum & energy

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  • where are the answers to problems mentioned above!!!!very unhelpful
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  • 1. MOMENTUM 1. Define momentum as mass times velocity . 2. Recognise that momentum is a vector quantity, and that its direction must always be stated or shown. 3. Describe experiments that show that momentum is conserved during collisions 4. Distinguish between external and internal forces in a collision 5. Introduce Force - time graphs in the context of a collision and use this to relate the change in momentum to the force impulse 6. Explain the difference between elastic and inelastic collisions. Reading p121 to 130
  • 2. BUILDING A DEFINITION Example 1 Why would this ship be difficult to slow down? ___________________________________ ___________________________________ ___________________________________ ___________________________________ ___________________________________ Example 2 What makes the Ferrari difficult to slow down ___________________________________________ ___________________________________________ ___________________________________________ The harder an object is too stop, the greater momentum it has.
  • 3. BUILDING A DEFINITION Example 1 Why would this ship be difficult to slow down? ___________________________________ ___________________________________ ___________________________________ ___________________________________ ___________________________________ Example 2 What makes the Ferrari difficult to slow down ___________________________________________ ___________________________________________ ___________________________________________ The harder an object is too stop, the greater momentum it has.
  • 4. BUILDING A DEFINITION Example 1 Why would this ship be difficult to slow down? ___________________________________ ___________________________________ ___________________________________ ___________________________________ ___________________________________ Example 2 What makes the Ferrari difficult to slow down ___________________________________________ ___________________________________________ ___________________________________________ The harder an object is too stop, the greater momentum it has.
  • 5. MOMENTUM IS A QUANTITY OF MOTION Clikview: “Collisions” > Conservation of momentum It is the product of an object’s mass and velocity. Momentum = Mass x velocity p = the object’s momentum (kgms-1) p = mv m = the object’s mass (kg) ~ ~ v = the object’s velocity (ms-1) Note Momentum is a vector quantity since it depends on velocity which is a vector quantity. Change in Momentum The change in momentum of an object equals the final momentum minus the initial momentum. p = pf - pi ~ ~ ~
  • 6. EXAMPLES 1. Calculate the momentum of a car that has a mass of 1200 kg and is travelling at 30 ms-1 __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ 2. Calculate the mass of a cricket ball that is bowled at 36 ms-1 and has a momentum of 7.2 kgms-1 __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ 3. Calculate the velocity of a person that has a mass of 140 kg and has a momentum of 1400 kgms-1 __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ Complete Q.1 - “Momentum & Impulse”
  • 7. INTERNAL & EXTERNAL FORCES Example Consider that two masses (A and B) initially stationery, push away from each other. v=0 F F v=? 2 ms-1 0.5 ms -1 A B A B A B 0.1 kg 0.1 kg 0.1 kg 0.1 kg BEFORE DURING AFTER In this situation there are no external forces. The forces necessary for the separation are internal. A exerts a force on B and B exerts a force on A as shown in the diagram (below). These forces are equal and opposite and are called an action - reaction couple. Examples of external forces: Friction, a push on one of the objects as it collides with the other object. In this example it is possible to calculate v using the law of conservation of momentum ......
  • 8. THE LAW OF CONSERVATION OF MOMENTUM In all collisions and explosions, provided there is no external force then the momentum of the system is conserved. Total momentum before = Total momentum after Note that momentum is a vector and therefore direction needs to be shown. In a problem where objects travel in a straight line, use + and - to indicate direction. Examples 1. A toy railway carriage of mass 5 kg travelling a 2 ms-1 collides with a stationery carriage which has a mass of 3 kg. After the collision the two carriages stick together and move as one. Calculate the speed of the carriages after the collision. - + __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________
  • 9. 2. The carriages, in a second collision, collide head on as shown in the diagram below. Calculate the velocity of the 3 kg carriage after the collision. - + __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ Complete Q.1 to 3 - “Collisions & Explosions”
  • 10. CHANGE IN MOMENTUM & IMPULSE [Examples: 1.Airbags 2. Jumping from a burning building onto a matress] • Impulse is a term that means “The change in momentum of an object” • Impulse = the final momentum - the initial momentum of the object. p = the object’s Impulse p = pf - pi ~ ~ ~ pf = the object’s final momentum pi = the object’s initial momentum Note: • Momentum is a vector and therefore direction needs to be shown. In a problem where objects travel in a straight line, use + and - to indicate direction. • Change in momentum is also a vector quantity and will therefore be positive or negative • An object experiences a change in momentum or impulse when it experiences a force over a period of time: Where F = the force acting on the object ∆p = F∆t ~ ~ and t = the time for which that force acts
  • 11. Change in momentum & force EXAMPLES 1. An apple of mass 250 g falls of a branch and lands on the ground. It is travelling at 3 ms-1 just before it hits the ground and stops. Calculate its change in momentum. 2. A 0.2 kg tennis ball collides with a solid wall as shown: 20 ms-1 20 ms-1 Determine the change in momentum of the ball. ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ Describe the force responsible for this change in momentum. ___________________________________________________________________ If the collision time is 0.1 s, calculate the size of this force. ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ Complete Q.2 - “Momentum & Impulse - Exercises”
  • 12. THE FORCE - TIME GRAPH An object receives an impulse when we change its momentum by applying a force to the object over a period of time. ∆p = F∆t ....... a rearrangement of F = ∆p ~ ~ ~ ∆t Impulse Force applied Consider... Taking a fall and hitting your head on the pavement wearing a helmet compared to having the equivalent fall without the helmet. F Without helmet With helmet => LESS force over a LONGER period of time. SAME AREA under the graph. Impulse = Area under the Force - time graph t Complete Q.3, 4, 7 & 8 - “Impulse & Momentum - Exercises”
  • 13. ELASTIC & INELASTIC COLLISIONS Momentum is always conserved in a collision (provided there are no external forces) Kinetic energy is not always conserved: • During elastic collisions, Kinetic energy is conserved. Ek before the collision = Ek after the collision • During inelastic collisions, Kinetic energy is not conserved. Some of the Ek is converted into other forms during the collision - commonly heat and sound Examples A trolley of mass 3 kg and speed 4 ms-1 collides head on with a stationery trolley of mass 1 kg. They stick together and move off with a speed of 3 ms-1. Momentum can be shown to be conserved in this collision. (a) Show that kinetic energy is not conserved in the collision. ________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________ (b) Where has the lost energy gone? ________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________
  • 14. Example A ballistic pendulum is used to measure the speed of a bullet. It is a large soft mass which has been suspended from the ceiling. When a bullet with speed v1 embeds itself into the mass the mass swings and rises a distance h as shown: 1 2 3 v1 v2 M m h v= 0 M +m The masses and the height are measured and recorded as follows: M = 998 g m=2g h = 10 cm Calculate the speed of the bullet v1 (in ms-1) ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________
  • 15. MOMENTUM SUMMARY Momentum is the product of an object’s mass and velocity. Momentum = Mass x velocity p = the object’s momentum (kgms-1) p = mv m = the object’s mass (kg) ~ ~ v = the object’s velocity (ms-1) Internal forces A exerts a force on B and B exerts an equal and in collisions opposite force on A A B and explosions Provided there are no external forces (forces acting from outside the system like friction) Momentum is always conserved: Momentum before the event = Momentum after the event
  • 16. Direction Momentum is a vector quantity. In 2D (motion along a straight line), one direction can be shown using a positive sign and the opposite direction can be shown using a negative sign. Example - Two utes collide 14 ms-1 10 ms-1 12 ms-1 v 1000 kg 1200 kg AFTER BEFORE Momentum after collision = Momentum before collision (since there are no external forces) (1000 x 12) + (1200.v) = (1000 x 14) + (1200 x 10) Solving this equation for v gives: v = 11.7 ms-1
  • 17. Change in Momentum, ∆p (or Impulse) ~ ∆p = pf - pi = F∆t Example - Crash helmets allow the same ~ ~ ~ ~ change in momentum to be achieved but with a smaller force over a larger collision time. ∆p = F ∆t Constant Conservation of kinetic energy occurs only in an elastic collision. This law is summarised as follows: For an elastic collision: Ek before the collision = Ek after the collision For an inelastic collision: Ek before the collision ≠ Ek after the collision In an inelastic collision some of the kinetic energy of the moving object/s is converted to other forms.