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    Plenum Edmund Thompsonpdf Plenum Edmund Thompsonpdf Presentation Transcript

    • Strategic Technologies for 2006 and 2016 These materials can be reproduced only with Gartner's written approval. Such approvals must be requested via e- mail — quote.requests@gartner.com.
    • Strategic Technologies for 2006 and 2016 Agenda What are the top 10 technologies an IT 1. professional needs to know about in 2006? What are the most disruptive trends and most 2. significant opportunities arising from emerging information technology for 2016? © 2006 Gartner, Inc. and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Reproduction of this publication in any form without prior written permission is Ed Thompson, Gartner forbidden. The information contained herein has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable. Gartner disclaims all warranties as to the accuracy, completeness or adequacy of such information. Gartner shall have no liability for errors, omissions or inadequacies in the Page 1 information contained herein or for interpretations thereof. The reader assumes sole responsibility for the selection of these materials to achieve its intended results. The opinions expressed herein are subject to change without notice.
    • Strategic Technologies for 2006 and 2016 Conclusion: Top 10 Technologies 2006 Visibility AJAX Real-time DW Grid Open Source WiMAX EIM Portals iSCSI SANs IP Telephony Utility Computing Instant Messaging Bluetooth Nanocomputing XBRL UWB Personal Search ZigBee Ontologies Virtualization Mobile Applications Microcommerce Natural Language Search Micro Fuel Cells e-Ink Speech Recognition Pervasive Computing 802.11g Trusted Platforms OLED/LEP Wikis Mesh Networks SOA Tablet PCs Information Extraction IT Self Service 4G Wireless Semantic Web Unified Communications Smart Dust Camera Phones Collective Intelligence Smart Phones Mashup Composite Technology Peak of Inflated Trough of Slope of Plateau of Trigger Expectations Disillusionment Enlightenment Productivity Mainstream Important Long Range Trends Virtualization Web 2.0 — AJAX Grid Computing + Web 2.0 Mashup Composite Model Service Oriented Architecture Collective Intelligence Enterprise Information Mgt Pervasive computing Open Source Personal Search This presentation highlights important technologies that should be tracked, and which represent major trends. In the next 18 to 36 months, we will see the risks of early adoption more-clearly identified and reduced. Most of these technologies exist in some form already, but have become suitable for a wider range of uses. In certain cases we will split potential uses into categories, only some of which will become mature in this time frame. By focusing on those categories that will be appropriate for exploitation, high value can be extracted from the technology without waiting for the full and final maturation of all its aspects and applications. An example from software-as-services is the applicability of Web services internally, while cross-enterprise deployments may have to wait for the maturation of authentication and security standards. This view of maturity is based on the Gartner concept of the Hype Cycle — that every technology and new idea is subject to distinct phases in its progress, from first elucidation to widespread market adoption. The cycle moves from the trigger or disclosure up to a Peak of Inflated Expectations, as the concept is widely discussed. Once actual use begins, the early adopters discover issues and incur failures — demonstrating that the appropriate use was poorly understood. The bad news drives an overreaction to the Trough of Disillusionment, until the real results can be sorted into best practices, pitfalls and so forth. The outcome is a climb to maturity where the new concept is well understood — in terms of what it can do and how best it should be implemented. © 2006 Gartner, Inc. and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Reproduction of this publication in any form without prior written permission is Ed Thompson, Gartner forbidden. The information contained herein has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable. Gartner disclaims all warranties as to the accuracy, completeness or adequacy of such information. Gartner shall have no liability for errors, omissions or inadequacies in the Page 2 information contained herein or for interpretations thereof. The reader assumes sole responsibility for the selection of these materials to achieve its intended results. The opinions expressed herein are subject to change without notice.
    • Strategic Technologies for 2006 and 2016 Virtualization Strategies Teleportation Dice and slice Aggregate Interposing technology that masks the physical nature and boundaries of resources from resource users. Virtualization can create some form of container that holds a workload — this can be an entire simulated server, as in a virtual partition, or it can be a portion of an OS instance. Each approach has advantages and disadvantages. These containers decouple the needs of the workload inside the container from the boundaries of the physical assets in the data center. A virtual machine monitor or hypervisor can quot;dice and slicequot;, making one physical box appear to be many smaller machines, each a container. The user is free to run independent operating systems and applications in each container. Some container technology permits quot;teleportationquot; — the movement of the container from one physical box to another — while the OS and workload inside the container continue along without disruption. Other container technology will permit a container to span multiple physical boxes. This is called quot;aggregationquot;, where the workload runs as if on a single big box under one OS, but is accessing the resources of multiple discrete machines. Dice and slice is the most common technique today, found in hardware partitions and all hypervisors or virtual machine monitors. Teleportation and aggregation are more recent arrivals that are rapidly entering the marketplace. © 2006 Gartner, Inc. and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Reproduction of this publication in any form without prior written permission is Ed Thompson, Gartner forbidden. The information contained herein has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable. Gartner disclaims all warranties as to the accuracy, completeness or adequacy of such information. Gartner shall have no liability for errors, omissions or inadequacies in the Page 3 information contained herein or for interpretations thereof. The reader assumes sole responsibility for the selection of these materials to achieve its intended results. The opinions expressed herein are subject to change without notice.
    • Strategic Technologies for 2006 and 2016 Strategic Planning Assumption: Grid computing within commercial organizations will be used mainly for computationally intensive workloads through 2007 (0.8 probability). Grid Computing Application Owner A Owner B Owner C Grid computing has become an over-hyped term. Major vendors such as IBM, Sun Microsystems, HP and Gateway have grid initiatives. There are many start-ups that assert a connection with grid. According to some people, grid will greatly boost the efficiency of existing resources, enable a revolution in the use of computers, and so forth — all the hyperbole that is characteristic of the Peak of Inflated Expectations on the Hype Cycle. Because the term has such cachet, it will increasingly be added to marketing brochures and slide presentations, often with only minor justification. Grid computing was developed in the scientific and technical computing fields as a continuation of decades of work to increase parallelism and create larger virtual computers than the actual servers that are affordable, or even achievable, with present technology. Big challenges, such as testing every possible compound to find candidates to block smallpox or cancer, are addressed by a grid. Basically, a large problem is addressed by an application that can be divided into many semiautonomous parts. The parts are then shipped to run on many separate computers. If all the computers are owned by one entity, this is a computer cluster. It becomes a grid when there are potentially multiple owners of the pool of computers used. Action Item: Look for large-scale technical, scientific and engineering applications that may be suitable for exploiting grid technology. © 2006 Gartner, Inc. and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Reproduction of this publication in any form without prior written permission is Ed Thompson, Gartner forbidden. The information contained herein has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable. Gartner disclaims all warranties as to the accuracy, completeness or adequacy of such information. Gartner shall have no liability for errors, omissions or inadequacies in the Page 4 information contained herein or for interpretations thereof. The reader assumes sole responsibility for the selection of these materials to achieve its intended results. The opinions expressed herein are subject to change without notice.
    • Strategic Technologies for 2006 and 2016 Strategic Planning Assumptions: By 2007, infrastructure and business application vendors will offer pre-integrated frameworks to build (or assemble) composition applications (0.8 probability). By 2008, SOA will provide the basis for 80 percent of new development projects, and will enable organizations to increase code reuse by more than 100 percent (0.8 probability). Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA): Moving From Theory to Practice Governance BPP Building Blocks QoS New Business Process Distribution SOA/SODA Framework Control Experience Management Security Definition Process Services Interop Information Management Measurement Integration Runtime APS/ESB Life Cycle Analysis, Testing, Performance Business Services Repository Security Skills SOA Disruptions SOA capabilities provide value through the cost-effective use of information assets, and emphasize the construction of dynamic composite chains of loosely coupled applications to reflect real-time business conditions. Service-oriented business applications (SOBAs) are built on SOA and use the service-oriented development of applications (SODA) — that is, development time concepts that leverage reuse and dynamic binding. Building applications on SOA is more than an applications development (AD) benefit — it makes changes broader, easier and less expensive, even across organizational boundaries and among organizations. The quick development of composite SOBAs will be a key SOA activity. The incorporation of, and the ability to work with, Web services standards (including BPEL, SOAP and WSDL) is a key characteristic of SOBA. Event-driven architectures are also relevant, because Web services and the standards that define them will enable companies to increase their sensitivity and response to significant changes in their service environments. Action Item: SOBAs offer real-time SOA benefits that will enable emerging business-critical processes in the next decade. Prepare for next-generation application deployment. The Business Process Platform requires a set of technologies that includes user experience, processes design, application integration, information management and a SOA/SODA framework. These tools are available today on an individual basis, but to deliver the consistent and controlled composition environment required by business users, these tools must be integrated and wrapped with security, management, analysis, testing and performance tools. This integrated toolset, plus management tools, also has to be integrated into the business services repository. Only then can sophisticated business users or business architects visually build a new business process and then select from content to build or compose new applications that model differentiated business processes. Vendors of applications, application infrastructure, application development, and information management technology are beginning to expand their offerings outward to include multiple components of this integrated toolset. User Advice: To enable quot;user-orientedquot; business process composition, you will need to acquire an integrated toolset that includes security and management capabilities. © 2006 Gartner, Inc. and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Reproduction of this publication in any form without prior written permission is Ed Thompson, Gartner forbidden. The information contained herein has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable. Gartner disclaims all warranties as to the accuracy, completeness or adequacy of such information. Gartner shall have no liability for errors, omissions or inadequacies in the Page 5 information contained herein or for interpretations thereof. The reader assumes sole responsibility for the selection of these materials to achieve its intended results. The opinions expressed herein are subject to change without notice.
    • Strategic Technologies for 2006 and 2016 Strategic Planning Assumptions: Through 2007, 20 percent of Fortune 1000 companies will deploy an enterprise-level EIM strategy in support of an SOA (0.7 probability). Through 2008, those organizations that adopt EIM will increase their chances of success in SOA by 70 percent (0.8 probability). Enterprise Information Management: A Necessary Compliment to SOA As the march toward service-oriented architecture (SOA) continues, a focus on information architecture is required. SOA is about extreme decoupling — decoupling data from process, application from interface and application from server. Accordingly, the success of SOA depends on knowing where information is (strategic management of metadata), how to connect to it (data integration platform), and the authoritative sources of information (master data management). SOA demands more from information architecture than previous development approaches. An agile company needs EIM. Building an SOA without an EIM strategy will significantly lower the response to business process choreography. One of the main benefits of SOBAs will be lost. Developing Web services and SOBA will be more expensive because each point will have to verify semantics, requiring more development time and money. The alternative is to remove the function whereby the semantics being referenced are checked. This can be done by creating a single semantic blanket company-wide, so that when a new service or application stack is added, the semantics are already assured and managed by the blanket. This removes the overhead at the service level but adds a cost for the blanket. More importantly, the required level of agility, the flexibility in being able to assemble and reassemble process through dynamic orchestration, can be achieved. An EIM layer across all repositories accessed by SOBAs will mean that service choreography can operate faster because it doesn't have to worry about semantics. Action Item: Develop an enterprise information management system to complement your SOA initiatives. © 2006 Gartner, Inc. and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Reproduction of this publication in any form without prior written permission is Ed Thompson, Gartner forbidden. The information contained herein has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable. Gartner disclaims all warranties as to the accuracy, completeness or adequacy of such information. Gartner shall have no liability for errors, omissions or inadequacies in the Page 6 information contained herein or for interpretations thereof. The reader assumes sole responsibility for the selection of these materials to achieve its intended results. The opinions expressed herein are subject to change without notice.
    • Strategic Technologies for 2006 and 2016 Strategic Planning Assumptions: By 2008, OSS solutions will directly compete with closed- source products in all software infrastructure markets (0.8 probability). By 2010, mainstream IT organizations will consider OSS in 80 percent of their infrastructure-focused software investments (0.7 probability). The Open-Source Stacks: Growing Up Products Maturity SugarCRM, Compiere, Ohioedge Enterprise Applications Collaboration Zope, phpBB, Nukes, PostNuke Midgard, OpenCms, Lenya, TYPO3, Red Hat Content Management Presentation Jetspeed, Gluecode, Zope, uPortal, Liferay Search Lucene, ht://Dig OpenFlow Process Management Eclipse, NetBeans, PHP, Perl, Struts, Hibernate, Spring Development Tools Integration Services openadaptor Celtix, ServiceMix Enterprise Service Bus JBoss, JOnAS, Application Servers Directory Services OpenLDAP RDBMS MySQL, PostgreSQL, Firebird, Ingres Snort, Nessus Security Linux, FreeBSD Operating System Xen Virtualization The success or failure of a product depends to a large extent on its quot;alignmentquot; with successful — or otherwise — products and technologies that together are available as a coherent platform or solution. This is an important differentiator for mainstream knowledge workplace products that are aligned with the solution strategies of successful platform vendors such as IBM, Oracle, Microsoft or SAP. The technology aggregation trend, which caused the rise of mainstream application platform suites and smart enterprise suite offerings, is also operating on open-source products. Many open-source products for the knowledge workplace — highlighted above — depend on, and even include, other open-source infrastructure servers and development tools as part of their distributions. As other open-source infrastructure pieces become mature and dependable, they serve as building blocks on which to base more-user-focused technology and services (typically relevant to the knowledge workplace). There is evidence that the cross-fertilization of different development efforts is accelerating overall development. Today, OSS is maturing in many levels of the software quot;stackquot;. Increasing numbers of IT organizations are finding open source to be a valid, cost-effective choice in many aspects of software infrastructure markets. © 2006 Gartner, Inc. and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Reproduction of this publication in any form without prior written permission is Ed Thompson, Gartner forbidden. The information contained herein has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable. Gartner disclaims all warranties as to the accuracy, completeness or adequacy of such information. Gartner shall have no liability for errors, omissions or inadequacies in the Page 7 information contained herein or for interpretations thereof. The reader assumes sole responsibility for the selection of these materials to achieve its intended results. The opinions expressed herein are subject to change without notice.
    • Strategic Technologies for 2006 and 2016 Moving From Search to Navigation Adaptive Automation Role-Based Access Access Social Networks Chronological Context Location Management Corporate Data Backlinking quot;Techno-foragerquot; • Capability Desktop Search • Complexity Application Data Personal • Storage Images, Video, Audio File System App-Specific Search Engine Discrete Basic Integrated Expanded Contextual quot;Findquot; Access Search Search Navigation Information access is moving from discrete individual searches, often done in the context of an individual application, to a rich, integrated world where users navigate through a sea of linked information. Ultimately, interpretable information of all kinds will find its way into searchable environments. However, searches alone will not be enough to provide quot;meaningfulquot; results. Classification or modeling of the information to be searched for and returned (for example, using ontologies) will also be needed to return rational results, and not just to reach all the possible sources. The application of techniques such as backlink analysis provides more context to the search. In the future, contextual navigation will expand, as social networks and knowledge of the user's role and current quot;statequot; in a business process are used to provide context for a particular request for information. As the world of information access evolves, the emphasis will shift from personal empowerment to the management of information access. Information access management is driven by the enterprise's need to have more control over information access (for example, who has access under what conditions). Management of the search environment, including the ability to limit a search based on defined rules (personal or enterprise), will help address the considerable enterprise security and personal privacy issues. In the longer term, the emphasis will shift to the automation of search/navigation. In an automated world, the system proactively examines personal preferences, the business process activity being performed, and other contexts to proactively serve up information that might be of value. In its ultimate incarnation, this would lead us to the world of intelligent agents and digital assistants. Adaptive access provides secure, managed, role/context-based linkage to business processes (aka quot;applicationsquot;), information and other users, from any location, by any user with any device, across any connection with the appropriate information/application delivery model and user interface. © 2006 Gartner, Inc. and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Reproduction of this publication in any form without prior written permission is Ed Thompson, Gartner forbidden. The information contained herein has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable. Gartner disclaims all warranties as to the accuracy, completeness or adequacy of such information. Gartner shall have no liability for errors, omissions or inadequacies in the Page 8 information contained herein or for interpretations thereof. The reader assumes sole responsibility for the selection of these materials to achieve its intended results. The opinions expressed herein are subject to change without notice.
    • Strategic Technologies for 2006 and 2016 Strategic Imperative: In a Web 2.0 world, it's the ecosystem, not the enterprise, that the IT function needs to serve. Web 2.0: Naming the Wave Web service-enabled User-created content: business models User-created metadata Micropayments Community User-created Business Revenue sharing applications Mashup syndication Collaborative creation Customer/community Collective intelligence participation Explicit community Long-tail economics ratings Technology & Architecture Ajax RSS Open interfaces: Remix/ Platforms & protocols, P2P WS*, REST, POX Mashups not products Web 2.0 refers to recent trends in the technology and business of the Web. It is loosely defined by the following attributes, only some of which (such as lightweight technology leading to rich user interfaces) are new: • Greater user participation — User-generated data and metadata and user-centric designs • Openness — Transparent processes, open application programming interfaces (APIs), and open-source software and content • Lightweight rather than heavyweight technology — Scripting languages, Asynchronous JavaScript and XML (Ajax)-based user interfaces, representational state transfer (REST)-based interaction protocol, RSS-based syndication and HTML-based microformats • Decentralized, distributed process — Ad hoc quot;mashupsquot; of Web sites building on public APIs; bottom-up, bazaar-style development; and content tagged by locally defined quot;folksonomiesquot; Action Item: Prepare for greater use of Web 2.0 technologies (such as Ajax, RSS, REST and microformats). But remember that technologies are not definitional, and they are not a long-lasting source of competitive advantage. What is new and challenging is the social dimension. © 2006 Gartner, Inc. and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Reproduction of this publication in any form without prior written permission is Ed Thompson, Gartner forbidden. The information contained herein has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable. Gartner disclaims all warranties as to the accuracy, completeness or adequacy of such information. Gartner shall have no liability for errors, omissions or inadequacies in the Page 9 information contained herein or for interpretations thereof. The reader assumes sole responsibility for the selection of these materials to achieve its intended results. The opinions expressed herein are subject to change without notice.
    • Strategic Technologies for 2006 and 2016 Strategic Planning Assumption: By 2008, AJAX-style GUIs will be the dominant style for RIA (Rich Internet Application) interfaces (0.8 probability). AJAX Rich Clients … Only The Beginning AJAX XHTML + CSS + DOM + XHTTPRequest Offline AJAX Emerging topic Open AJAX IBM-led initiative Related Initiatives Microsoft Live http://www.buzzwordcompliant.net/?p=2 IBM Workplace AJAX enables browser-based applications to have the interactive look and feel of desktop applications. JavaScript embedded in the Web page handles input from the user, and instead of fetching a complete new page, uses XMLHTTPRequest to fetch some data (usually in XML format) and then render it on the current Web page by updating the DOM (Document Object Model). This can be done quickly enough with today's high-speed Internet connections to deliver surprisingly responsive interfaces. Rich Internet application (RIA) technology in general, and AJAX technology in particular, can provide substantial improvements in user experience that result in measurable business value. However, the benefits are not automatic, and depend as much on changes to development processes, and on an awareness of usability-centered design issues, as they do on technology such as AJAX. Organizations that incorporate AJAX into their Web development projects must select from four levels: 1) Snippet-level — code fragments that can be easily folded into existing applications; 2) Widget-level — self-contained user interface components that can be bolted on; 3) Framework-level — a comprehensive framework that requires a rewrite of the front end; and 4) Back-end-integrated — a framework with substantial linkage to back-end systems. All represent worthwhile choices for an organization, but each has unique risks, rewards and trade-offs, and none can be considered the single strategic choice. The Open AJAX initiative, led by IBM, is designed to bolster Eclipse's standing as one of the two main IDEs (along with Microsoft's Visual Studio). Open-source software (OSS) is highlighted, with Eclipse, Mozilla and several OSS AJAX toolkits (Dojo, openrico, Zimbra and others still to come) playing a prominent role. Wider participation is needed for Open AJAX to become strategic. So far there is no attempt to standardize toolkits, only the connection to the IDE. AJAX-enabled Eclipse seems lightweight compared with offerings from AJAX-focused vendors. Over time, Gartner expects to see a richer technology layer between Eclipse and the toolkits. Users should expect significant evolution in these models through 2010, as the Web model matures to embrace rich and complex client environments. AJAX represents only one part of an evolving distributed Web model that takes advantage of rich client capabilities and deals with sporadically connected and offline use cases. Other initiatives, such as Microsoft Live and IBM Workplace, also attempt to provide managed environments assuming more robust client software. © 2006 Gartner, Inc. and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Reproduction of this publication in any form without prior written permission is Ed Thompson, Gartner forbidden. The information contained herein has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable. Gartner disclaims all warranties as to the accuracy, completeness or adequacy of such information. Gartner shall have no liability for errors, omissions or inadequacies in the Page 10 information contained herein or for interpretations thereof. The reader assumes sole responsibility for the selection of these materials to achieve its intended results. The opinions expressed herein are subject to change without notice.
    • Strategic Technologies for 2006 and 2016 Strategic Planning Assumption: By 2008, Web mashups will be the dominant model for the creation of composite enterprise applications (0.7 probability). Mashups: Composite Model for Opportunistic/Situational Applications Google Maps + Fandango = Mashmap.com Google Maps + Salesforce.com = smashforce A mashup is a Web site or Web application that combines content from multiple sources into a single integrated presentation. A mashup uses a variety of public interfaces, including APIs, Web service calls, JavaScripts and Web feeds (e.g., RSS, Atom) to source the content. The term was inspired by a similar use of the expression in pop music, where it refers to the practice of creating a new song by assembling purloined parts of other existing songs. A rich community is growing on the Web, experimenting with mashups based on eBay, Amazon, Google and Yahoo! APIs. Google, Microsoft, and Yahoo! offer map-based APIs that have resulted in mashups of data and geography that in turn drive traffic and advertising. Amazon Web Services (AWS) provides access to its platform and product data and, as of 4Q 2005, reportedly has more than 120,000 developers and over 975,000 active seller accounts (those that have sold at least one item in the previous year), with many using AWS. Third-party sellers generated $490 million in 2Q 2005, which accounts for 28 percent of Amazon's unit sales (up from 24 percent in 2Q 2004). © 2006 Gartner, Inc. and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Reproduction of this publication in any form without prior written permission is Ed Thompson, Gartner forbidden. The information contained herein has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable. Gartner disclaims all warranties as to the accuracy, completeness or adequacy of such information. Gartner shall have no liability for errors, omissions or inadequacies in the Page 11 information contained herein or for interpretations thereof. The reader assumes sole responsibility for the selection of these materials to achieve its intended results. The opinions expressed herein are subject to change without notice.
    • Strategic Technologies for 2006 and 2016 Strategic Planning Assumption: By 2008, Web services best practice will have shifted away from ad hoc approaches to accessing and updating stateful resources to a uniform approach based on a small set of state management operations (0.8 probability). Web Platform APIs — A Partial List 411sync - SMS messaging GraphMagic - Graph and chart services Amazon - Online retailer, search, queuing service Internet Archive - Non-profit Internet library AmphetaRate - News aggregator JotSpot - Wiki-style collaboration tools Backpack - Online information manager Library of Congress SRW - Information search BBC - Multimedia archive database Microsoft - Mapping (MapPoint, Virtual Earth) Blogger - Blogging services NASA - Satellite mapping images Bloglines - Online feed aggregator NCBI Entrez - Life sciences search services Buzznet - Photo sharing NewsGator - Feed aggregation CDYNE - Data delivery services NOAA Weather Service - Weather forecast database cPath - Medical database lookup PayPal - Online payments Creative Commons - Licensing engine integration Plazes - Location discovery service Data On Call - Fax services Skype - VoIP software del.icio.us - Social bookmarking StrikeIron - Web services marketplace Digital Podcast - Podcast search Tagalag - Email tagging eBay - Online marketplace Tagyu Tag - Recommendation service EVDB - Events database Technorati - Blog search FedEx - Package shipping Telcontar - Location-based services FeedBurner - Blog promotion tracking service Trekmail - Messaging services FeedMap - Blog geo-coding TypeKey - Authentication framework Findory - Personalized news aggregation Upcoming.org - Collaborative event calendar Flickr - Photo-sharing service UPS - Package shipping Freedb/CDDB - Online CD catalog service Yahoo! - Ads, ad mgt, maps, search, shopping geocoder - Geographic lookup services ZipCodes - Zip code lookup service Gigablast - Search service Zvents - Events ecosystem Google - Adwords, advertising, search, maps Amazon Simple Queue Service (summarized from Amazon.com Web services site) Amazon Simple Queue Service (Beta) offers a reliable, highly scalable hosted queue for buffering messages between distributed application components. Using the Simple Queue Service (SQS), developers can decouple components of their application so that they run independently. SQS provides the message management between the independent components. Any component of a distributed application can store any type of data in a reliable queue at Amazon.com. Another component or application can retrieve the data using queue semantics. The system is intended to reduce the costs associated with resolving the producer-consumer problem in distributed application development. It is specifically designed for use by distributed applications. A single queue can be used simultaneously by many distributed application components. There is no need for components to coordinate with each other to enable them to share a queue. A configurable read-lock feature is included to lower the incidence of duplicate messages when two applications are concurrently reading from the same queue. StrikeIron (summarized from Strikeiron.com) The StrikeIron Web Services Marketplace includes all the StrikeIron Web Services and quot;StrikeIron Marketplace Powered Web Servicesquot; from other providers. All the Web services in the StrikeIron Marketplace are sold through StrikeIron and have distinct advantages, such as availability of simplified sign-on, simplified billing and accounting, flexible pricing alternatives, and integrated tools and services to accelerate their utilization. StirkeIron's capabilities include: commerce, communications, computers, content databases, entertainment, finance, general business, government, human resources, marketing, multimedia, news, reference, sales, sports, supply chain, transportation and utilities. © 2006 Gartner, Inc. and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Reproduction of this publication in any form without prior written permission is Ed Thompson, Gartner forbidden. The information contained herein has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable. Gartner disclaims all warranties as to the accuracy, completeness or adequacy of such information. Gartner shall have no liability for errors, omissions or inadequacies in the Page 12 information contained herein or for interpretations thereof. The reader assumes sole responsibility for the selection of these materials to achieve its intended results. The opinions expressed herein are subject to change without notice.
    • Strategic Technologies for 2006 and 2016 Strategic Planning Assumptions: By 2012, radio frequency identification (RFID) and similar wireless chips will evolve from supply-chain technologies into enablers of value-added consumer applications, such as item location and status reporting. By 2012, RFID tags will add mesh network capabilities (0.6 probability). Tactical Guideline: Type A organizations that need to carry out simple sensing in inaccessible locations should conduct trials of sensor networks in 2006. Pervasive Computing — RFID Tags and Mesh Networks RFID — Beyond Bar Codes Mesh Networks Read while covered or moving Low-power CPU Scan at a distance Survives water, heat, painting On-chip wireless Price dropping to low levels Ad hoc networking Can remain in product for life algorithms Privacy issues must be solved May be self- Applications powered Toll pass systems On-chip sensors Pet identification (such as MEMS) Access cards Retail theft protection Improved asset control Real-time retail-shelf inventory Improve manufacturing and supply-chain efficiency After-sale service offerings Photo source: Texas Instruments The use of RFID tags has been relatively low and at a steep price premium compared with bar coding or other marking methods. Usage will continue to increase rapidly as the advantages of this technology over bar codes are exploited. Volume increases beget cost reductions, fueling further expansion of the technology to lower value and higher volumes of tracked items. During the remainder of this decade, the costs will decline to the point where RFID will become ubiquitous in supply chains, retailing and manufacturing environments. Tags embedded in products, as opposed to packaging, enable life-of-the-product tracking and in-depth identification of the history and state of each product instance. Clever businesses will develop value-added services, based on RFID information, that can be offered to generate incremental profit from customers during a product's life. Receiving, warehousing, distribution and retail will gain speed and cost advantages from RFID. To gain these advantages, new investments will have to be made in systems and tools, moderating the adoption rate. quot;Mesh networkquot; is a broad term describing wireless networks in which a node can relay signals via several other nodes. In a sensor network, each mesh node includes, or is connected to, a sensor of some type. Examples include temperature, vibration or pressure sensors. Some vendors produce small nodes with a battery life of several years. Mesh networks offer several potential advantages for industrial and military M2M applications, including low installation cost, scalability and resilience. Action Item: Evaluate the potential advantages of RFID tags for high-value objects, new services and sharp improvements in efficiency; as costs decrease, broaden the investigation to a wider set of uses. © 2006 Gartner, Inc. and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Reproduction of this publication in any form without prior written permission is Ed Thompson, Gartner forbidden. The information contained herein has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable. Gartner disclaims all warranties as to the accuracy, completeness or adequacy of such information. Gartner shall have no liability for errors, omissions or inadequacies in the Page 13 information contained herein or for interpretations thereof. The reader assumes sole responsibility for the selection of these materials to achieve its intended results. The opinions expressed herein are subject to change without notice.
    • Strategic Technologies for 2006 and 2016 Strategic Planning Assumption: By 2010, 80 percent of Internet-connected individuals will knowingly or unknowingly participate in some NCI activity (0.7 probability). Networked Collective Intelligence A Different Kind of Problem Solving NCI Technique Domain Large Scale Unrestricted editorial acess using a wiki Content Creation (e.g., Wikipedia.org) Open Participation Diverse and Directories (e.g., Open Directory User-created Web-wide directory Project) Distributed NASA Clickworker Project Image classification Incremental Spam Filtering Network (Razor) Collaborative spam detection and Improvement filtering Seller/buyer/product ratings eBay, Epinions, Yahoo!,... Independent Folksonomies (e.g., Technorati, Label Weblogs, bookmarks, pictures, (little or no interaction) del.icio.us, Flickr) content... Search results relevance (Google) Use hyperlinks as ratings Ad hoc & Small Contributions Prediction Markets (NewsFutures, Rate, buy/sell ideas/opinions Foresight Exchange) Expert Syndication (e.g., InnoCentive) Locate, buy, rate experts Self-Selection Shop Recommendation Engines (e.g., Popularity-based ratings; collaborative Aggregation Amazon) filtering Mechanisms P2P Networks (e.g., Skype, Shared infrastructure; near-symmetrical BitTorrent) communication rates Common/Diffused Open-Source Development Software creation Ownership Communities are the basis of society and work. Traditional communities tended to be based on relatively long- lived social groupings, such as families, employment or team membership. However, technology has enabled many new types of community, as well as new ways for communities to collaborate. Organizations can take advantage of technology-enabled communities and collaboration by, for example: • Extending their enterprise boundaries to new sources of talent, even for their core competencies (for example, through quot;bountyquot; sites, such as InnoCentive and TopCoder). • Looking for implicit patterns and information in data created as a side effect of networked interactions, such as Google's link analysis to determine Web site quality. • Identifying relevant contributors in real time (for example, through expertise location). During the next decade, collaboration will rise above the radar screen for many corporations, which will observe, manage, monitor and measure, and archive collaboration as a corporate resource. Action Item: Look for opportunities not just to support collaboration and in-house communities, but also to exploit broader communities enabled or identified by technology. © 2006 Gartner, Inc. and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Reproduction of this publication in any form without prior written permission is Ed Thompson, Gartner forbidden. The information contained herein has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable. Gartner disclaims all warranties as to the accuracy, completeness or adequacy of such information. Gartner shall have no liability for errors, omissions or inadequacies in the Page 14 information contained herein or for interpretations thereof. The reader assumes sole responsibility for the selection of these materials to achieve its intended results. The opinions expressed herein are subject to change without notice.
    • Strategic Technologies for 2006 and 2016 Agenda What are the top 10 technologies an IT 1. professional needs to know about in 2006? What are the most disruptive trends and most 2. significant opportunities arising from emerging information technology for 2016? © 2006 Gartner, Inc. and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Reproduction of this publication in any form without prior written permission is Ed Thompson, Gartner forbidden. The information contained herein has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable. Gartner disclaims all warranties as to the accuracy, completeness or adequacy of such information. Gartner shall have no liability for errors, omissions or inadequacies in the Page 15 information contained herein or for interpretations thereof. The reader assumes sole responsibility for the selection of these materials to achieve its intended results. The opinions expressed herein are subject to change without notice.
    • Strategic Technologies for 2006 and 2016 2001 Strategic Planning Assumption: By 2007, more than 30 percent of contact center personnel will be dedicated to providing quot;secretquot; customer service (that is, invisible to the customer) as part of an automated customer interface (0.6 probability). 2006 Strategic Planning Assumption: By 2010, 15 percent of organizations will move to intent- driven customer strategies (0.7 probability). Help Yourself Seamless Service Operating across automated and live channels quot;Secretquot; Service Unseen human in the loop Service Avoidance Automation, communities Self-Sufficiency Deeper involvement in product definition/ service resolution Customer Intent-Driven Proactively addressing customers' goals Since 2001, many organizations have continued a strong focus on self-service, including creating seamless service experiences across multiple interaction channels. A few have introduced quot;secretquot; service models, in which human agents support the automated systems where they fall short, often without the customer knowing that there is a human in the loop. Finding alternate ways to solve a customer's problem is also a key goal — for example, by automating problem diagnosis and resolution, or by creating communities of customers who can help each other. Future directions include a drive toward helping the growing body of smart, informed customers become more self-sufficient through services such as quot;design your own credit cardquot; in which customers can explicitly trade off interest rates against loyalty points and the amount of the annual fee. This is part of a broader trend toward understanding and delivering to a customer's intent (for example, does this customer want to travel somewhere as quickly as possible, or as cheaply as possible?), which involves balancing the intentions that the business has for the customer with the most likely intentions that the customer has for the business. Action Item: Reevaluate organizational processes to explicitly address the context of the customer relationship and each interaction within that relationship. © 2006 Gartner, Inc. and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Reproduction of this publication in any form without prior written permission is Ed Thompson, Gartner forbidden. The information contained herein has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable. Gartner disclaims all warranties as to the accuracy, completeness or adequacy of such information. Gartner shall have no liability for errors, omissions or inadequacies in the Page 16 information contained herein or for interpretations thereof. The reader assumes sole responsibility for the selection of these materials to achieve its intended results. The opinions expressed herein are subject to change without notice.
    • Strategic Technologies for 2006 and 2016 2001 Strategic Planning Assumption: By 2008, a new billion-dollar industry will emerge, based on collecting, organizing and selling tags as a distinct commodity (0.6 probability). 2006 Strategic Planning Assumption: By 2015, specific industries (for example, healthcare, insurance, marketing) will create a billion dollars of additional revenue through automated discovery of new attributes (0.6 probability). Tagging the World: New Sources and Types of Information Attribute Attributes Items Techniques Topic Text, images Text analysis + Quality Audio, video Link analysis Status Products, services Peer tagging Location People Semantic markup Affinity Places Content mining Key Trends Growth of tagging marketplaces Automated discovery of new attributes In 2001, Gartner featured a trend concerning the rise of information tags that described attributes of an item (such as content, services, people, locations) . The trend focused on the information content rather than on physical tags such as radio frequency identification (RFID). The trend highlighted the increase in automated techniques to create information tags (for example, quality, topic) and the growth of a quot;feedback societyquot; in which individuals contributed their own perspectives rather than leaving things to the professionals. A recent surge in online tagging services (such as digg.com, Flickr and del.icio.us) has pushed this trend into the foreground, and we predict further traction and applicability of this phenomenon. The availability of tagged items on such a massive scale will lead to new capabilities (for example, machine learning techniques for image recognition). In addition, the routine collection and automated analysis of new data types (such as location, proximity) will lead to the identification of new types of attribute (for example, the quot;entropyquot; of a person — see MIT's Reality Mining project at http://reality.media.mit.edu/). Action Item: Identify opportunities to better understand and target customers and to optimize service offerings based on attributes that are available through mass peer tagging or that can be automatically discovered and assigned. © 2006 Gartner, Inc. and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Reproduction of this publication in any form without prior written permission is Ed Thompson, Gartner forbidden. The information contained herein has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable. Gartner disclaims all warranties as to the accuracy, completeness or adequacy of such information. Gartner shall have no liability for errors, omissions or inadequacies in the Page 17 information contained herein or for interpretations thereof. The reader assumes sole responsibility for the selection of these materials to achieve its intended results. The opinions expressed herein are subject to change without notice.
    • Strategic Technologies for 2006 and 2016 2001 Strategic Planning Assumption: By 2010, 70 percent of the population in developed nations will spend 10 times longer per day interacting with people in the e-world than in the physical one (0.6 probability). 2006 Strategic Planning Assumption: By 2015, more than 100 leading companies will have made or saved at least $10 million due to collective intelligence (0.6 probability). Community as Core Competency New marketplaces Extend your organization Scientific Discovery by using, or being, the new InnoCentive marketplaces Financial Services Leverage implicit Prosper Product design contributions: buying, Threadless linking, clicking, searching Microservices Use the power of scale to Amazon Mturk solve old problems in new ways Collective Intelligence Open-source, Wikipedia Leverage lead users to Prediction markets help drive innovation Tagging Technology has enabled many new types of communities, as well as new ways for communities to collaborate, which in turn has created new sources of information and new styles of creation. Organizations can take advantage of technology-enabled communities by: • Extending their enterprise boundaries to new sources of talent, even for their core competencies — for example, through quot;bountyquot; sites, such as InnoCentive and TopCoder • Using networked collective intelligence to leverage small contributions from a broad community of motivated, self-selecting contributors • Taking advantage of the massive scale of worldwide network connectivity to trigger new approaches to difficult problems • Identifying and leveraging quot;lead usersquot; (see quot;Democratizing Innovationquot; by Eric von Hippel) who can contribute in a major way to design innovation Action Item: Take advantage of new types of community interaction that can extend your enterprise and its creative processes. © 2006 Gartner, Inc. and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Reproduction of this publication in any form without prior written permission is Ed Thompson, Gartner forbidden. The information contained herein has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable. Gartner disclaims all warranties as to the accuracy, completeness or adequacy of such information. Gartner shall have no liability for errors, omissions or inadequacies in the Page 18 information contained herein or for interpretations thereof. The reader assumes sole responsibility for the selection of these materials to achieve its intended results. The opinions expressed herein are subject to change without notice.
    • Strategic Technologies for 2006 and 2016 2001 Strategic Planning Assumption: By 2005, the use of Web services will herald the rise of peer-to-peer service consumer/producer relationships (0.8 probability). 2006 Definition: quot;Applicationquot; shifts from being quot;what you buyquot; to quot;what you do with the software assets under your control, whether homegrown or purchased.quot; Applications Shift From Pre-Canned Logic to Dynamic Assemblies Application SOA, EDA, BPM, BPP, Monoliths, SODA/ISE, Shifts to Driven By Black or composite applications, Opaque reuse, metadata, MDA Boxes Well-Defined, Atomic Functional Components and Processes Vendor User BPP, SODA/ISE, Shifts to Design for Tailored Driven By metadata, portals Mass- for Market Fit Custom Fit BAM, RTI, BPA, BPM, rules engines, Shifts to Driven By composite applications, Web 2.0 Optimizing the Efficiency Optimizing the Agility of the Process of the Process A critical shift in the concept of quot;applicationquot; is under way. Once end users stopped creating all their own monolithic applications, applications became vendor-constructed monoliths — mass-market-focused bundles of black-boxed functionality, delivered on a vendor-specified release schedule. With the advent of new technical capabilities (for example, integrated service environment [ISE], business process management suite and real- time infrastructure [RTI]) and new architectural models (such as service-oriented architecture [SOA] and event- driven architecture [EDA]), the application is being re-cast. The black box of monolithic business logic is being cracked open, exposing access to smaller components or services (for example, SOA-based). Each of these components or services is able to participate in a larger quot;compositionquot; of application logic using business process management (BPM) and ISE/service-oriented development of applications (SODA) process-centric concepts, driven by needs unanticipated by the original creator or vendor. Vendor-mandated and vendor-delivered upgrades are being replaced by change based on systems-level and application-level feedback derived from monitoring and performance information offered by business activity monitoring (BAM), RTI, business process analysis (BPA) and BPM. The overarching shift is one of increased agility for the end users, and a de-emphasis of the traditional, pre-defined application as an entity in its own right. © 2006 Gartner, Inc. and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Reproduction of this publication in any form without prior written permission is Ed Thompson, Gartner forbidden. The information contained herein has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable. Gartner disclaims all warranties as to the accuracy, completeness or adequacy of such information. Gartner shall have no liability for errors, omissions or inadequacies in the Page 19 information contained herein or for interpretations thereof. The reader assumes sole responsibility for the selection of these materials to achieve its intended results. The opinions expressed herein are subject to change without notice.
    • Strategic Technologies for 2006 and 2016 2001 Strategic Planning Assumption: By 2007, more than 60 percent of the population will carry or wear a wireless computing and communications device at least six hours a day, and by 2010, more than 75 percent will do so (0.6 probability). 2006 Strategic Planning Assumption: The volume of real-time information reaching urban consumers will increase tenfold by 2015 (0.7 probability). Real World Web Real-World Web Technologies Behavior-based Pricing Models Wireless communications Usage, risk Sensor networks Object identification Location identification Attribute tags Smart Objects and Packaging Know identity, location, owner, history, safety, environment … Augmented Reality Context-based information at point of decision/action Unifying Digital and Physical Worlds Increasingly, real-world objects will not only contain local processing capabilities due to the falling size and cost of microprocessors, but they will also be able to interact with their surroundings through sensing and networking capabilities. The emergence of this real-world Web will bring the power of the Web, which today is perceived as a quot;separatequot; virtual place, to the user's point of need of information or transaction. Companies will be able to take advantage of ongoing connectivity — for example, delivering product safety or recall alerts or additional services even after products have been provided to customers. They will also capitalize on the potential for new pricing models, such as location tracking for insurance or hourly car rental. Augmented reality will allow the user's view of the real world to be supplemented with relevant information, such as context-specific text or graphics delivered to a heads-up display or mobile device, or audio information delivered to a headset. Electronic devices and other consumer products may also introduce quot;sociablequot; attributes, such as recognizing their owner and determining when they are being held. Action Item: Identify applications in which decisions can be improved by delivering context-specific information to mobile workers or customers. © 2006 Gartner, Inc. and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Reproduction of this publication in any form without prior written permission is Ed Thompson, Gartner forbidden. The information contained herein has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable. Gartner disclaims all warranties as to the accuracy, completeness or adequacy of such information. Gartner shall have no liability for errors, omissions or inadequacies in the Page 20 information contained herein or for interpretations thereof. The reader assumes sole responsibility for the selection of these materials to achieve its intended results. The opinions expressed herein are subject to change without notice.
    • Strategic Technologies for 2006 and 2016 Strategic Planning Assumptions: By 2015, the improvement in the productivity of information workers that can be attributed to increased display screen workspace will exceed 20 percent (0.6 probability). By 2015, the focus of user interfaces (UIs) will shift from designing individual interfaces for devices to creating a proactive UI framework for the environment (0.6 probability). The Experience Is the Computer GUI remains dominant 2010 Devices integrate information from many sources to create Ambient intelligence: off the contextual and sociable user desktop and into the world experience More-diverse user populations 2015 Display advances: Focus shifts from large screen, e-paper interfaces for devices to Alternate inputs: digital a proactive UI framework pen, speech, touch for the environment 2020 Truly mobile devices: vehicles, robots Although little has changed in the dominant user interface paradigm — the graphical user interface (GUI) — for nearly 20 years, a number of technology advances will start to change the interface landscape by 2010. Large- screen displays will drop in price, and low-cost screen digitizers and OS support (Windows Vista) for pen interfaces will make the pen input and touch screens more prevalent. Mobile phones and music players will incorporate contextual knowledge about owners, profiles, locations and so forth. Starting at about 2010, devices will integrate information from many sources to deliver an integrated and sociable user experience. After 2015, the so-called desktop will flow off of the desk and into office appliances and the walls around the user. In this world of ambient intelligence, any nontrivial device will contain some degree of embedded processing and communications capability. In this new environment, the focus shifts from interfaces on individual devices to an quot;environmental user interface,quot; acting as a contextual user access and information delivery engine across multiple interconnected devices. Action Item: Be ready for major shifts in the 2010 to 2015 time frame, but focus investment on specific applications with quantifiable value, such as digital pens to speed access to captured data. © 2006 Gartner, Inc. and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Reproduction of this publication in any form without prior written permission is Ed Thompson, Gartner forbidden. The information contained herein has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable. Gartner disclaims all warranties as to the accuracy, completeness or adequacy of such information. Gartner shall have no liability for errors, omissions or inadequacies in the Page 21 information contained herein or for interpretations thereof. The reader assumes sole responsibility for the selection of these materials to achieve its intended results. The opinions expressed herein are subject to change without notice.
    • Strategic Technologies for 2006 and 2016 Strategic Imperative: Examine how the smaller granularity of tasks and interactions will provide you with more flexibility in internal processes and external relationships. Unbundling Business Processes: Connectivity + Granularity = Opportunity Established More Granular IT More Granular Business B2B, B2C, C2C Architecture (SOA) Architectures (distributed Connectivity workforce, BPM) Transfer of New Products Responsibility and Services Simple Eliminate Tasks Automate Microcontent Re-keying Credit check Ring tones data RFID tag read Collective Intelligence iTunes Creation Distribute Articles Classification Self-service Call center Quality rating Online purchases Help desk Prediction Airport kiosks Microservices Self-checkout Taxi dispatch Outsource Voice response Parking reservation Call center Delivery Help desk Emerging Opportunities Complex Tasks One of the most significant high-level trends driven by IT is the ability to address all kinds of business problems — interactions, transactions, tasks, processes, applications, relationships — at a much smaller level of granularity than has been possible in the past. The modularity of service-oriented architecture, together with digital infrastructures for B2B and B2C commerce, are decreasing the cost and increasing the ability of breaking apart traditional processes into smaller chunks, which can then be reexamined to optimize their delivery options. Emerging opportunities are arising, in particular, from the ability to let consumers take on more responsibility for activities that have traditionally been performed by companies. The first of these were the self-service applications that eliminated the need for a customer service representative through self-service kiosks and check- outs. We anticipate the next round to be focused on specialized activities that can be packaged in such a way that they can be conducted either by customers (for example, equipment diagnosis) or others in the supply chain (for example, a repair shop performing a claims adjustment). © 2006 Gartner, Inc. and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Reproduction of this publication in any form without prior written permission is Ed Thompson, Gartner forbidden. The information contained herein has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable. Gartner disclaims all warranties as to the accuracy, completeness or adequacy of such information. Gartner shall have no liability for errors, omissions or inadequacies in the Page 22 information contained herein or for interpretations thereof. The reader assumes sole responsibility for the selection of these materials to achieve its intended results. The opinions expressed herein are subject to change without notice.
    • Strategic Technologies for 2006 and 2016 Strategic Planning Assumption: Throughout 2015, the 80 percent of low-volume niche products will experience at least 2 percent more compound annual growth than the 20 percent of blockbusters in most retail categories (0.7 probability). The Rise of Long-Tail Business Blockbusters Blockbusters $ sales/product Less Dominant $ sales/product Niche/Long-Tail Business Number of Products* Number of Products Increased Reach of Consumers: Increased Reach of Businesses: Search, affinity, community Lower cost of targeted advertising More granular services Mass customization Advertisement must account for new realities New products become economical More choice drives more competition In many retail disciplines, the 80-20 rule governed for a long while — approximately 20 percent of the products received approximately 80 percent of the revenue. This was due to limited shelf and display space and the high marketing costs for a few widely popular channels. Now, the growth of the online channel is changing this. Consumers have dramatically more reach and flexibility online through much-improved search engines and discovery mechanisms (for example, collaborative filtering on Amazon and Netflix, and location-based search on Google and Yahoo). Consumers can now tap into myriad virtual communities, while the TV industry also moves into quasi-on-demand with personal recording devices. The resulting fragmentation means more choice and less dominance of a few channels. In addition, the Web will increasingly provide an unlimited amount of (potentially personalized) shelf space, removing physical constraints. Publication costs are also decreasing, allowing small vendors to make themselves heard in the appropriate corners of the Web (through context- and content-based advertisements). This will not only affect marketing departments, but also product designers, who can now count on having their products placed on much more appropriate channels. Action Item: The rise of niche markets will be a phenomenon that advertisers, marketing people and product designers alike must pay attention to. © 2006 Gartner, Inc. and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Reproduction of this publication in any form without prior written permission is Ed Thompson, Gartner forbidden. The information contained herein has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable. Gartner disclaims all warranties as to the accuracy, completeness or adequacy of such information. Gartner shall have no liability for errors, omissions or inadequacies in the Page 23 information contained herein or for interpretations thereof. The reader assumes sole responsibility for the selection of these materials to achieve its intended results. The opinions expressed herein are subject to change without notice.
    • Strategic Technologies for 2006 and 2016 Strategic Imperative: Use radar screens to provide an objective justification of technology investment priorities. From Hype to Benefit: Prioritization Less than 2 years 2 to 5 years 5 to 10 years Beyond 10 years Years to Maturity Transform- SOA Business Process Platforms Carbon ational XBRL Model-Driven Approaches Nanotubes Type C Collective Intelligence DNA Logic Type B Investment Trusted Computing Group Quantum Investment Profile Profile WS-Enabled Business Models Computing High Impact Internal Web Services BPM Suites Augmented Reality RSS Corporate Semantic Web Inkjet Manufacturing VoIP Electronic Ink Internet Micropayments Grid Computing Micro Fuel Cells Location Aware Apps RFID (passive) OLEDs Text Mining Sensor Networks P2P VoIP 4G Moderate Business Rules Engine Biometric Identity Software as a Service Impact Corporate Blogging Documents Type A Tablet PC Investment Desktop Search Biometric User Profile Videoconferencing Speech Recognition for Identification WiMAX Telephony Prediction Markets Text-to-Speech Key: 4G fourth-generation wireless OLED organic light-emitting device Low Impact Handwriting Recognition P2P peer-to-peer Linux on Desktop RSS really simple syndication Podcasting SOA service-oriented architecture Benefit Wikis VoIP voice over Internet Protocol WS Web service In this radar screen we have taken the technologies from the Hype Cycle for Emerging Technologies, 2005 and reorganized them in a way that provides a defensible justification for technology investments. The vertical hype axis has been replaced with a focus on the potential benefit of the technology, and the horizontal axis groups the technologies according to their rate of maturation. Shown is a cross-industry assessment of key emerging technologies and the likely impact of each on business processes. Priority investments are in the top left of the radar screen, in which the technologies potentially will have a high impact and have reached a reasonable level of maturity. Companies that are conservative in their technology adoption (Type C organizations) may limit their focus to this area (for example, VoIP). Companies that are more-aggressive technology adopters (Type A and Type B organizations) are likely already using technologies that will mature in less than two years. Therefore, they will probably want to evaluate candidates further to the right or lower on the radar screen; for example, incorporating technologies, such as Web-services-enabled business models or text mining, that will not be in widespread use for at least five years but may provide a competitive edge in the interim. © 2006 Gartner, Inc. and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Reproduction of this publication in any form without prior written permission is Ed Thompson, Gartner forbidden. The information contained herein has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable. Gartner disclaims all warranties as to the accuracy, completeness or adequacy of such information. Gartner shall have no liability for errors, omissions or inadequacies in the Page 24 information contained herein or for interpretations thereof. The reader assumes sole responsibility for the selection of these materials to achieve its intended results. The opinions expressed herein are subject to change without notice.
    • Strategic Technologies for 2006 and 2016 Strategic Technologies For 2006 and 2016 2006 Top 10 Technologies 2016 Top Trends Virtualization Help Yourself Grid Computing Tagging The World Service-Oriented Architecture Community as Core Competency Enterprise Information Management Pre-canned Logic to Dynamic Assemblies Open Source Real-World Web Information Access Experience is the Computer AJAX Unbundling Processes Mashup Composite Model Long-Tail Businesses Pervasive Computing Most worthwhile trends operate in a 10-year Collective Intelligence time frame from inception to mainstream. Ensure you have a technology planning and monitoring process. The 10 technologies discussed in this presentation are potentially strategic and valuable to many corporations. They are all partially immature today, but will mature enough for widespread use in the next 18 to 36 months. In many cases, maturity will occur only for a subset of the technology or for well-defined applications, with full maturity for more-general use lagging beyond the three-year window. This selection provides a pointer to 10 very interesting technologies, but does not represent a complete list of technologies to be evaluated and potentially used. For a longer-range and more-comprehensive view, we recommend the complementary set of presentations at Symposium: Emerging Trends and Technologies. These 10 opportunities should be considered in conjunction with many proven, fully-mature technologies, as well as others that did not make this list, but can provide value for many companies. For example, real- time enterprises (RTEs) providing advanced devices for a mobile workforce will consider next-generation smartphones to be a key technology, in addition to the value that this list of 10 might offer. © 2006 Gartner, Inc. and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Reproduction of this publication in any form without prior written permission is Ed Thompson, Gartner forbidden. The information contained herein has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable. Gartner disclaims all warranties as to the accuracy, completeness or adequacy of such information. Gartner shall have no liability for errors, omissions or inadequacies in the Page 25 information contained herein or for interpretations thereof. The reader assumes sole responsibility for the selection of these materials to achieve its intended results. The opinions expressed herein are subject to change without notice.