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N Te Q vs% Traditional
N Te Q vs% Traditional
N Te Q vs% Traditional
N Te Q vs% Traditional
N Te Q vs% Traditional
N Te Q vs% Traditional
N Te Q vs% Traditional
N Te Q vs% Traditional
N Te Q vs% Traditional
N Te Q vs% Traditional
N Te Q vs% Traditional
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N Te Q vs% Traditional

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This is a presentation about the differences between the NTeQ Model and the traditional classroom setting.

This is a presentation about the differences between the NTeQ Model and the traditional classroom setting.

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  • 1. NTEQ PHILOSOPHY VS. TRADITIONAL CLASSROOM Mona McCarty CMP 540 University of Phoenix Melissa Abella, Anthony Connor, Frankiettia Griffin, Faith Kemp, Kendra Ligon, Kesha Williams
  • 2. Introduction  The NTeQ Philosophy uses technology and student centered learning to deliver learning experiences. This is much different than the strategies used to impart knowledge in the traditional classroom setting.  There are some similarities and many differences.  The teacher, student and computer all have different roles to play in lessons and the classroom environment.  Lessons are less rigid and allow students to discover the knowledge we are trying to provide to our students.
  • 3. Differences and similarities Traditional vs. NTeQ classroom Differences Traditional  learning based on awards, credits, and individual performance  Offers a variety of courses to satisfy learning needs  Teacher is the designer of environment and lesson plans  Students use textbooks, paper, pencils, and encyclopedias  “drill and practice” form of education (Morrison & Lowther, 2005) NTeQ  Student centered  Independence, responsibility, profound education  components changed the way teachers will design and carry out lessons
  • 4. Differences and similarities Similarities  environments are conducive to learning  classroom management is important  the teacher is the designer, manager and facilitator of the classroom  preparing students for society
  • 5. Teacher Both Traditional  Teacher determines appropriate methods and techniques for instruction  Technological competence is unnecessary  Teacher acts as planner, instructor, and NTeQ expert  Designs how the classroom will be run, organized, and arranged  Teacher is technologically competent  Teacher acts as designer, manager, and facilitator  Knows how to use computer as a learning tool  Able to design lessons as well as manage and facilitate multidimensional classroom learning environment  Understands the correlation between the student and the computer
  • 6. Student Both Traditional  Students expected to meet objectives  Student remains passive recipient of knowledge NTeQ  Engages primarily in individual work  Student actively engages in learning process  Sits at desk  Students in the traditional classroom  Assumes the role of researcher perform a "drill and practice" form of  Becomes technologically competent education, based on a behavioral approach where the students memorize the  Engages in collaborative learning information (Morrison & Lowther, 2005).  Complete activities at their own discretion  See technology used with delivery of instruction than with independent  Works on individualized assignments at exploration different places in the room  Have limited exposure to technology usage  Manages their own behavior  May become bored and frustrated  At the center of learning (Vincent, 2009).  Prepared for modern day society  Role is one of independence  Collaborate in small groups  Active learner
  • 7. Computer NTeQ Traditional Classroom  Is used as a tool –  Used primarily for low- does not stand alone level applications  Functions in tangent  Seen as an “add-on” to with students’ abilities the curriculum  Provides for  May sit idle in back of meaningful learning classroom
  • 8. Lessons NTeQ Traditional Classroom  Lessons are designed to  Lessons are designed and keep students actively implemented without involved modifications  Students play a large role in the lesson  Students are led “through” a lesson – may  Objectives are meaningful not be actively engaged and authentic in their learning
  • 9. Environment  Traditional NTeQ  Teacher centered  Student centered encourages student’s use of materials to complete task  Teacher disciplines  Self discipline with teacher’s boundaries  Students at desk as teacher  Assignments at different places in speaks room  Students at desk as teacher  encourages student’s use of informs materials to complete task
  • 10. Conclusion  There are several differences between the NTeQ philosophy and the traditional method of education.  There are similarities between the two models.  Both place a huge emphasis on the teacher as the facilitator and students completing objective based activities.  Both are conducive learning environments, require good classroom management skills and prepare students for society.  Because NTeQ outweighs the Traditional Method in outstanding and beneficial ways, students are able to become advanced learners and researchers while applying their skills.
  • 11. References Morrison, G.R.. Lowther, D.L., DeMeulle, L. (In Press) Integrating computer technology into the classroom. Retrieved from ProQuest on July 17, 2009. Morrison, G. R. & Lowther, D. L. (2005). Integrating computer technology into the classroom. New Jersey: Prentice-Hall. Vincent, Samantha. (2009). The disadvantages of a traditional classroom . Helium. Retrieved August 19, 2009, from http:// www.helium.com/items/1296189-disadvantages-traditional- classroom

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