Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
In-Car GPS Navigation: Engagement with and Disengagement from the Environment
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

In-Car GPS Navigation: Engagement with and Disengagement from the Environment

863
views

Published on

CHI2008 presentation: In-Car GPS Navigation: Engagement with and Disengagement from the Environment

CHI2008 presentation: In-Car GPS Navigation: Engagement with and Disengagement from the Environment

Published in: Economy & Finance, Education

0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
863
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
34
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • Hello everyone, and welcome to this talk
  • Transcript

    • 1. In-Car GPS Navigation: Engagement with and Disengagement from the Environment Gilly Leshed 1 , Theresa Velden 1 , Oya Rieger 2 , Blazej Kot 1 , Phoebe Sengers 1 1 Information Science, 2 Communication Cornell University
    • 2. December 26, 2007 Garmin GPS -- one of the top-selling holiday items in 2007 at Amazon.com Driving and navigating with in-car GPS change engagement with the environment
    • 3. Outline
      • Theoretical framework
        • Losses vs. opportunities
        • Space and place
      • Field study
        • Navigation
        • Orientation
        • The experience of driving
      • Implications and Conclusions
        • The broader context
        • Design implications
    • 4. Outline
      • Theoretical framework
        • Losses vs. opportunities
        • Space and place
      • Field study
        • Navigation
        • Orientation
        • The experience of driving
      • Implications and Conclusions
        • The broader context
        • Design implications
    • 5.
      • GPS relieves the need to observe the environment while driving and navigating (Aporta & Higgs, 2005)  Loss of engagement
      • GPS provides new forms of interacting with the environment (Dourish, 2006)  Opportunity for engagement
      Losses vs. opportunities photo: www.alaska-in-pictures.com
    • 6. Space and Place
      • Space – abstract, open, allows movement
      • Place – concrete, stable, represents pause, has value
      • (Tuan, 1977; Harrison & Dourish, 1996)
      • Participating in the environment creates a sense of place in a blurred space
      • Interacting with technological spaces and places in GPS affects interaction with physical spaces and places
    • 7. Space and Place
      • Space – abstract, open, allows movement
      • Place – concrete, stable, represents pause, has value
      • (Tuan, 1977; Harrison & Dourish, 1996)
      • Participating in the environment creates a sense of place in a blurred space
      • Interacting with technological spaces and places in GPS affects interaction with physical spaces and places
    • 8. Outline
      • Theoretical framework
        • Losses vs. opportunities
        • Space and place
      • Field study
        • Navigation
        • Orientation
        • The experience of driving
      • Implications and Conclusions
        • The broader context
        • Design implications
    • 9. Field study of in-car GPS users
      • Participants
      • 10 users of in-car GPS systems
      • Method
      • Used own devices or friends’/family’s
      • 5 pre-planned rides 5 artificial trips
      • 1-3 hours observation & interview
      • Data
      • Field notes
      • Audio-recordings
    • 10. Results: 1. Navigation
      • Pre-navigation/route choice
      • Key in destination, no need to know where it is
      • GPS calculates route based on settings – not necessarily matching driving experiences
      “ it gave us some bizarre routes to get back to Ithaca… turns out that the toll road setting was on [laughs]. I ignored it… and we figured it out later.”
    • 11.
      • Route following
      • No need to attend to objects along the way: blindly following vocal directions
      • GPS automatically calculates new route when instructions not followed
      • But – Glance at the GPS map or bring other navigation aids
      Results: 1. Navigation “ The only thing you have to do with the nav system is you have to learn what a quarter of a mile feels like, you know, otherwise it says a quarter of a mile and you think ‘Oh, I need to turn!’ and you turn too soon.”
    • 12.
      • Getting lost and feeling lost
      • Free to explore
      Results: 2. Orientation “ it makes me much more confident to know that if I get lost I can find my way home again. I don’t have to stress about getting lost anymore.”
    • 13.
      • Social interactions around the GPS
      • GPS designed for driver-unit interaction But many drive with others in the car
      • Driver/navigator roles
      • But passenger can interact with GPS unit
      Results: 3. The experience of driving “ it used to be that whoever wasn’t driving was the navigator... And so if there was a mistake made, the navigator would say ‘Turn! Turn!’ and it would be drama. But now, if you miss a turn… it’s just automatic.”
    • 14.
      • Treating the GPS unit as a social agent
      • Naming the GPS unit: “Heather”, “Mrs. Prius”
      • Talking to unit in a social way
      Results: 3. The experience of driving Go home! Oh, I thought you were talking to me
    • 15.
      • Interactions with the external environment
      • Interaction with virtual world drives interaction with physical world (e.g. POI, road curvature on map)
      • Physical space remains indistinct – places are in GPS
      • Vs. Enriched interactions with physical spaces and places
      Results: 3. The experience of driving “ Remember when we all went white water rafting? We were in this really strange town and the GPS found us a place to eat.”
    • 16. Discussion
      • Loss of environmental engagement
      • But also new opportunities for engagement
      • Blurred boundaries between physical and virtual worlds
    • 17. Outline
      • Theoretical framework
        • Losses vs. opportunities
        • Space and place
      • Field study
        • Navigation
        • Orientation
        • The experience of driving
      • Implications and Conclusions
        • The broader context
        • Design implications
    • 18. The Broader Context (1)
      • Commodification and de-skilling
      • (Borgmann, 1984)
      • Navigation and orientation as commodity – no skilled interaction with environment is necessary
      • Satisfaction from practicing skill replaced by comfort of effortless consumption
    • 19. The Broader Context (2)
      • Automobilization
      • (Urry, 2004; Thrift, 2004)
      • The role of the car in detaching its passengers from their surroundings
    • 20. Design implications for environment awareness and interaction
      • Navigate by landmarks
      • Support the car as a social place
      • Highlight ambiguity of GPS data
      • Extend context-aware capabilities
    • 21. Design implications for environment awareness and interaction
      • Navigate by landmarks
      • Support the car as a social place
      • Highlight ambiguity of GPS data
      • Extend context-aware capabilities
    • 22. Design implications for environment awareness and interaction
      • (1) Navigate by landmarks
    • 23. Design implications for environment awareness and interaction
      • (2) Support the car as a social place
    • 24. Conclusions
      • In-car GPS navigation alters how people interpret, navigate through, experience, and interact with spaces and places
        • Immersion in technological environment and disengagement from physical environment
        • New tools and information resources enrich travel experiences
      • Design implications for engaged environmental interactions
        • In light of larger socio-technical context of GPS as a paradigm for technological devices and the automobile age
    • 25. Thank you [email_address] [email_address] field research Hrönn Brynjarsdóttir Ellie Buckley Lucian Leahu Heather Marciniec Meena Natarajan Claudia Pederson Sadat Shami Howyee Au Yong advice Jeremy Birnholtz Barry Brown Kirsten Boehner Paul Dourish $$$ NSF IIS-0238132 NSF IIS-0534445