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Ace: Impetus for Community Action
 

Ace: Impetus for Community Action

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  • Adverse Childhood Experiences determine the likelihood of the ten most common causes of death in the US
  • Point out that these coping strategies are solutions that almost work. More effective coping strategies will be suggested at the end of the presentation. Felitti quote: “It is hard to get enough of something that almost works.”
  • The pyramid helps to visualize the process by which harsh experiences such as abuse, neglect, and loss of birth parent(s) during childhood result in health problems in adulthood.
  • Still have a profound effect 50 years later. ACEs are the main determinant of health and social well-being of our nation.
  • The early years of life matter because they affect the architecture of the maturing brain The quality of that architecture establishes either a resilient or a fragile foundation for all of the development and behavior that follows
  • The following graphs visually show the increasing correlation between the number of ACE scores (along the bottom from left [ 1] to right [6 ]) and the % of people engaging in the risky behaviors (vertically from 0% at the bottom to 100% at the very top). Note:—even 6 or more ACEs does not automatically mean a person will engage in the risky behavior or have the adult chronic disease, but the % of those with high ACE scores who also engage in the behavior or have the disease/condition is increased. Note: These can be run through fairly quickly.
  • Red = unintended pregnancy Yellow = elective abortion
  • Females are red; males are yellow
  • individual with an ACE score of 4, is 12 times more likely to attempt suicide than those with none.
  • As you can see the higher the number of ACEs, the greater the risk . In fact an ACE score of 6 or more results in 20 year decrease in life expectancy.
  • Diabetes, depression, heart disease, chronic lung disease
  • Experience a range of emotions -- joy, connectedness, sadness, and anger
  • Give the group a couple of minutes to share. Ask for volunteers to share one important protective factor in their community.
  • Note: Explain Community Circle of Care to Trainers One caring adult can make a significant difference in the life of a child.
  • Exercise: Hand out to the audience the 7 Strategies to Build Strong Communities Personal Commitment Checklist and the Evaluation Form. This is also an opportunity to pass out a contact information sheet if people want to be contacted or get involved with the Regional Prevention Council. Explain that the Personal Commitment Checklist is a summary of the last several slides with ideas of ways people can get involved to reduce ACEs, Build Strong Communities and Raise Strong Kids. Ask audience to take 5 minutes to review the form and make a personal commitment to engage in at least one activity. The audience members keep their personal commitment forms. Answer questions. Ask audience to complete the evaluation form and collect them.

Ace: Impetus for Community Action Ace: Impetus for Community Action Presentation Transcript

  • Strong Communities Raise Strong Kids Adverse Childhood Experiences: Impetus for Community Action Regional Child Abuse Prevention Councils 2010
    • “ The solution of all adult problems tomorrow depends in large measure upon the way our children grow up today.”
    • - Margaret Mead, Anthropologist
    Regional Child Abuse Prevention Councils 2010
  • What Are ACEs? Adverse Childhood Experiences
    • ACEs are experiences in childhood that are unhappy, unpleasant, hurtful.
    Regional Child Abuse Prevention Councils 2010
  • ACEs Often Last a Lifetime . . . But They Don’t Have To
    • Healing can occur
    • The cycle can be broken
    • Safe, stable, nurturing relationships heal parent and child.
    Regional Child Abuse Prevention Councils 2010
  • Complete ACE Questionnaire
    • What does it make you think about?
    • Keep in mind your thoughts as we present the ACE Study
    Regional Child Abuse Prevention Councils 2010
  • What are Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs)?
    • Growing up (prior to age 18) in a household with:
    • Recurrent physical abuse.
    • Recurrent emotional abuse.
    • Sexual abuse.
    • Emotional or physical neglect.
    Regional Child Abuse Prevention Councils 2010
  • Growing up (prior to age 18) in a household with (cont):
    • An alcohol or drug abuser
    • An incarcerated household member.
    • Someone who is chronically depressed, suicidal, institutionalized or mentally ill.
    • Mother being treated violently.
    • One or no parents.
    Regional Child Abuse Prevention Councils 2010
  • Why is This Important?
    • Because ACEs are:
    • Surprisingly common
    • The basis for many common public health
    • problems
    • Strong predictors of later social functioning,
    • well-being, health risks, disease, and death
    Regional Child Abuse Prevention Councils 2010
  • ACE Scores
    • 1/3 of adults have an ACE score of 0
    • The majority of adults with an ACE score of 0 have few, if any, risk factors for diseases that are common causes of death in the US.
    Regional Child Abuse Prevention Councils 2010
    • An ACE Score of 4 or more results in having multiple risk factors for these diseases or the disease themselves.
    • An ACE score of 6 or more results in a 20 year decrease in life expectancy.
    Regional Child Abuse Prevention Councils 2010
  • Do you know the top 10 risk factors/behaviors for death in the USA?
      • smoking,
      • severe obesity,
      • physical inactivity,
      • depression,
      • suicide attempt,
      • alcoholism,
      • illicit drug use,
      • injected drug use,
      • 50+ sexual partners,
      • history of STD
    Regional Child Abuse Prevention Councils 2010
  • Evidence Suggests:
    • Many chronic diseases in adults are determined decades earlier, by experiences in childhood
    • Risk factors/behaviors for these diseases are initiated during childhood or adolescence and continue into adult life.
    Regional Child Abuse Prevention Councils 2010
  • Seeking to Cope
    • The risk factors/behaviors underlying these adult diseases are actually effective coping devices.
    • What is viewed as a problem is actually a solution to bad experiences.
    • Dismissing these coping devices as “bad habits” or “self destructive behavior” misses their functionality.
    Regional Child Abuse Prevention Councils 2010
  • Family Centered Practice, June 8, 2007 Regional Child Abuse Prevention Councils 2010
  • Behavior is Predictable
    • All Behavior has meaning - both good behavior and bad behavior
    • We need to look closely at the antecedents to behavior - What happened first that is causing this behavior?
    Regional Child Abuse Prevention Councils 2010
  • Life in a Tough World
    • If trauma/toxic stress occurs early in life, the brain becomes wired to survive it.
    Regional Child Abuse Prevention Councils 2010
  • Early Brain Development
    • Healthy brain architecture builds on nurturing, responsive, and individualized interactions from birth.
    • Healthy brain architecture is the foundation for all future learning, behavior and health.
    Regional Child Abuse Prevention Councils 2010
  • Stress and the Brain
    • Excessive and repeated stress:
      • Neglect, violence
      • Chaos, unpredictability
      • Hostility, rejection
    • Causes disruption of brain architecture:
      • Impairs cell growth
      • Interferes with healthy neural circuits
    Regional Child Abuse Prevention Councils 2010
  • Regional Child Abuse Prevention Councils 2010
  • What Does This Look Like?
    • Teen that is:
      • Edgy, hot tempered
      • Impulsive
      • Hyper-vigilant
    Regional Child Abuse Prevention Councils 2010
  • By adolescence, children seek relief through:
    • Drinking alcohol
    • Smoking tobacco
    • Sexual promiscuity
    • Using drugs
    • Overeating/eating disorders
    • Delinquent behavior
    Regional Child Abuse Prevention Councils 2010
  • High Risk Teen Behaviors
    • May not be the core problem
    • They may be the coping devices
    • A way to feel safe or just feel better
    Regional Child Abuse Prevention Councils 2010
  • Adverse Childhood Experiences vs. Smoking as an Adult Regional Child Abuse Prevention Councils 2010
  • Adverse Childhood Experiences vs. Adult Alcoholism Regional Child Abuse Prevention Councils 2010
  • ACE Score vs. Intravenous Drug Use Regional Child Abuse Prevention Councils 2010
  • Adverse Childhood Experiences vs. Likelihood of > 50 Sexual Partners Regional Child Abuse Prevention Councils 2010
  • ACE Score vs. Unintended Pregnancy or Elective Abortion Regional Child Abuse Prevention Councils 2010
  • Childhood Experiences Underlie Chronic Depression Regional Child Abuse Prevention Councils 2010
  • Childhood Experiences Underlie Later Suicide Regional Child Abuse Prevention Councils 2010
  • ACE Score vs. Serious Job Problems Regional Child Abuse Prevention Councils 2010
  • US Health Care Costs
    • US Health Care Spending 2007:
    • - $7,600 per person
    • - $2.3 Trillion
    • - 4.3 times the amount spent on national defense
    Regional Child Abuse Prevention Councils 2010
  • Reducing Costs
    • Asking about ACEs – significantly decreases doctor office visits and costs.
    Regional Child Abuse Prevention Councils 2010
  • Pay Now or Pay Later
    • Pay now for programs that have been proven to buffer the stress, or pay later in rising health costs.
    • “ Early childhood investments of high quality have a lasting effect.”
    • “ $10 return on investment for every $1 spent.” (James Heckman, Noble Laureate, Economics)
    Regional Child Abuse Prevention Councils 2010
  • Our Challenge
    • We can and must “immunize” kids against the effects of ACEs.
    • We can and must reduce the numbers of ACEs for all children!
    Regional Child Abuse Prevention Councils 2010
  • Caring Communities Can Help Reduce ACEs Regional Child Abuse Prevention Councils 2010
  • Mental Health
    • “ Mental health is indispensable to well-being, relationships, and contribution to the community or society.”
      • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Mental Health: A Report of the Surgeon General, 1999.
    Regional Child Abuse Prevention Councils 2010
  • Mentally Healthy Children
      • Experience a range of emotions in appropriate and constructive ways
      • Possess positive self-esteem and a respect for others
      • Have a sense of security and trust in themselves and the world
      • Hagan JF, Shaw JS, and Duncan PM, eds. Bright Futures Guidelines for Health: Supervision of Infants, Children, and Adolescents , Third Edition, Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, 2008.
    Regional Child Abuse Prevention Councils 2010
  • Safe, Stable, Nurturing Relationships……
    • are the key to mentally healthy children and adolescents
    Regional Child Abuse Prevention Councils 2010
  • What is Resilience?
    • Good outcomes in spite of serious threats, toxic stress.
    • Resilient people:
    • are prepared to be effective in the world
    • can adapt to challenges
    • are mentally healthy
    Regional Child Abuse Prevention Councils 2010
  • Resilience is:
    • Feeling connected to caring family and community
    • Self-regulation skills
    • Positive view of self
    • Motivation to be effective in your environment
    Regional Child Abuse Prevention Councils 2010
  • Protective Factors
    • Are conditions that increase health and well-being for children
    • Are buffers that provide support and coping strategies for parents
    Regional Child Abuse Prevention Councils 2010
  • Group Exercise
    • Turn to your neighbor
    • Share some of your thoughts about important resilience and protective factors in your community
    Regional Child Abuse Prevention Councils 2010
  • Protective Factors
    • Parental Resilience
    • Social Connections
    • Knowledge of Effective Parenting Skills and Child Development
    • Concrete Supports in Time of Need
    • Nurturing and Attachment
    Regional Child Abuse Prevention Councils 2010
  • Safe, Stable, Nurturing Relationships
    • SAFE = free from harm
    • STABLE = a high degree of consistency
    • NURTURING = compassionate, responsive caregiver(s)
    Regional Child Abuse Prevention Councils 2010
  • What Can We Do To Promote Good Beginnings for Kids? Regional Child Abuse Prevention Councils 2010
  • “ Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed people can change the world. Indeed it is the only thing that ever has.” Margaret Mead Regional Child Abuse Prevention Councils 2010
  • 7 Strategies to Build Strong Communities Regional Child Abuse Prevention Councils 2010
  • Provide Information
    • Raise public awareness
    • Display Strong Communities Raise Strong Kids posters
    • Hand out Strong Communities Raise Strong
    • Kids brochures
    Regional Child Abuse Prevention Councils 2010
  • Enhance Skill
    • Help educate colleagues about ACEs
    • Educate parents about how to build resilience in children from birth
    • Teach child care providers, home visitors, physicians and others to build resilience in families
    Regional Child Abuse Prevention Councils 2010
    • Teach skills
    • to youth
    Regional Child Abuse Prevention Councils 2010
  • Be a caring adult Spend quality as well as quantity time with a child; read a book, share a meal. Regional Child Abuse Prevention Councils 2010
  • Talk with Family, Friends and Neighbors
    • Share and discuss the ACE questionnaire with your family
    • Ask about ACEs, acknowledge your own
    • De-stigmatize ACEs – it can be therapeutic
    • Volunteer, start a Community Circle of Care.
    Regional Child Abuse Prevention Councils 2010
  • Contribute to Community Programs Regional Child Abuse Prevention Councils 2010
  • Enhance Access Reduce Barriers
    • Seek support for needed resources (grant proposals, local collaborations, etc)
    • Offer concrete supports (food, shelter, seek professional help if needed)
    • Link clients to effective community resources (faith based activities, after-school programs, recreation, parenting classes, counseling, domestic violence shelters/education)
    Regional Child Abuse Prevention Councils 2010
    • When communities make family mental health services available, they bolster kids’ ability to handle stress and prevent damage to the developing brain.
    Regional Child Abuse Prevention Councils 2010
  • Change the Physical Environment
    • Lead or participate in a clean up effort
    • Initiate a change making your community safer
    • Volunteer to paint a home
    • Support your Child Abuse Prevention Council
    Regional Child Abuse Prevention Councils 2010
  • Change Consequences
    • Thank someone for their hard work
    • Publicly recognize a community group that strengthens families
    • Publish an article in a newspaper highlighting someone in the community
    • Give rewards to individuals or businesses for helping in the community
    Regional Child Abuse Prevention Councils 2010
  • Support Family-Friendly Public Policies Regional Child Abuse Prevention Councils 2010
  • Modify/Change Policy
    • Talk to legislators and philanthropists about supporting effective programs
    • Contribute to child abuse prevention programs via a tax check off
    • Support positive parenting programs, domestic violence and mental health education and services
    Regional Child Abuse Prevention Councils 2010
    • If our society is to prosper in the future , we will need to make sure that all children have the opportunity to develop intellectually, socially and emotionally.
    Regional Child Abuse Prevention Councils 2010
  • To Get Involved Contact
      • Insert Local Regional Prevention Council Contact Info
      • Insert Other Relevant Local Resources Contact Info
      • Marcia Stanton, Child Abuse Prevention Coordinator, Phoenix Children’s Hospital
        • [email_address]
      • Mary Warren, New Parent Resource Coordinator, Prevent Child Abuse Arizona
        • [email_address]
    Regional Child Abuse Prevention Councils 2010
  • Parenting Resources
    • 1-877-705-KIDS (5437)
      • Birth to Five Parenting Questions Helpline
    • 1-800-4-A-CHILD (422-4453)
    • Crisis Line for emotional needs and information about child abuse and neglect. Also go to www.childhelp.org
    • Insert Local Resources
    • www.apa.org/books
    • www.pbs.org/parents/childdevelopment
    • www.cdc.gov/parents
    Regional Child Abuse Prevention Councils 2010
  • Information & Resources
    • ACE Study findings and information
    • - www.acestudy.org or www.cdc.gov
    • National Scientific Council on the Developing Child at Harvard University
    • - www.developingchild.net
    • Academy of Pediatrics
    • - www.brightfutures.aap.org
    Regional Child Abuse Prevention Councils 2010
  • More Information & Resources
    • National Center for Trauma-Informed Care – www.mentalhealth.samhsa.gov/nctic
    • National Child Traumatic Stress Network – www.nctsnet.org
    • Center for the Study of Social Policy -Information on Strengthening Families and Protective Factors – www.cssp.org
    • Center for Injury Prevention and Control – www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention
    Regional Child Abuse Prevention Councils 2010
  • Strong Communities Raise Strong Kids Regional Child Abuse Prevention Councils 2010
  • Personal Commitment Exercise
    • Review the 7 Strategies to Build Strong Communities Personal Commitment Checklist
    • Get Involved to Reduce ACEs, Build Strong Communities and Raise Strong Kids.
    Regional Child Abuse Prevention Councils 2010