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The Non-Traditional Search -- Branding
The Non-Traditional Search -- Branding
The Non-Traditional Search -- Branding
The Non-Traditional Search -- Branding
The Non-Traditional Search -- Branding
The Non-Traditional Search -- Branding
The Non-Traditional Search -- Branding
The Non-Traditional Search -- Branding
The Non-Traditional Search -- Branding
The Non-Traditional Search -- Branding
The Non-Traditional Search -- Branding
The Non-Traditional Search -- Branding
The Non-Traditional Search -- Branding
The Non-Traditional Search -- Branding
The Non-Traditional Search -- Branding
The Non-Traditional Search -- Branding
The Non-Traditional Search -- Branding
The Non-Traditional Search -- Branding
The Non-Traditional Search -- Branding
The Non-Traditional Search -- Branding
The Non-Traditional Search -- Branding
The Non-Traditional Search -- Branding
The Non-Traditional Search -- Branding
The Non-Traditional Search -- Branding
The Non-Traditional Search -- Branding
The Non-Traditional Search -- Branding
The Non-Traditional Search -- Branding
The Non-Traditional Search -- Branding
The Non-Traditional Search -- Branding
The Non-Traditional Search -- Branding
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The Non-Traditional Search -- Branding

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  • Branding is nothing new in the corporate world, but personal branding has really come on the scene in the past 5-10 years. Although the term is a little difficult to nail down in terms of a definition, it is essentially a promise of value that people come to expect from you. Let’s look at how to go about creating your brand.
  • A personal brand consists of 3 A’s: First, your Authentic Image—This is "the genuine you"—not costumed to play the part of someone else, but cast in the right role… a Master F.I.T.™ role that allows you to be radically rewarded and enthusiastically engaged in work that adds value to others. The slide indicates “doing work you’re passionate about.” Even if you’re doing work right now that you’re not truly passionate about, the essence of who you are can still shine through. Let’s say, for example, that part of your brand image is about optimism—in other words, you bring optimism to your work, your team, your customers, and so on. That optimism will shine through whether you are selling computers, planning production schedules, or fixing machinery. The second “A” in your brand has to do with Advantages—This “A” is synonymous with benefits and value. It’s your value proposition—what makes you able to contribute to the organization’s bottom line. You can identify and articulate your advantages by writing Success Stories that capture a numbers-oriented, bottom-line value to employers. We’ll talk more about developing SMART Stories in just a minute. Awareness—The final "A" refers to communicating your brand in a manner that makes people attentive and responsive to it. You can do this through your resume, your networking interactions, and your interviews.
  • Although every person can have a personal brand, it is particularly helpful for professional and management candidates. You might be thinking, “do I really need a brand?” If you don’t intentionally put forward the image that you want people to have about you, they will be the ones determining your brand attributes, and you may not like what they choose! Some of the reasons why a compelling, cohesive brand will help include: Creating employer desire to hire you because a good brand includes a value proposition for employers Controlling what networking contacts and interviewers remember most about you. You can do this by emphasizing your brand elements as you talk with people. Lowering the barriers to hiring by creating trust. A strong brand creates trust because people know what to expect. Differentiating you from the competition – candidates with a strong brand look more professional than those without. Guiding you in decisions about which interviews to pursue Making you more attractive to employers, even when there are no formal job openings available.
  • This slide shows how you can start to mine for your brand attributes. Note that the form here has three columns: adjectives, which will be your “soft” brand attributes. Nouns, which will be your “hard” brand attributes. And Verbs, which will be your “advantages / value proposition.” [Note: if time allows, and the people in the group know one another to some degree, turn this into an exercise by saying “Pair up with someone and we’ll work through a few of these questions together.”] Note the brand-building questions under the first column: What do people admire/love most about you? (including your boss, coworkers, colleagues, friends, family members, etc.) And, what mannerisms differentiate you? [If paired up, tell them to Ask your partner to answer those questions about you. Take just a few minutes. Then switch partners.] Next, let’s look at the brand-building questions for the nouns, or “hard” brand attributes. As you can see, the examples for this are business strategist, troubleshooter, turnaround artist, transformer, corporate marketing, environmentally proactive. The brand-building questions include “what reputation are you most proud of? What products or services are you most passionate about? And What roles or titles do colleagues most associate you with?” [If group is paired up, direct pairs to share answers as one another, as they did with the last column.] And finally, the last column, which has to do with your impact or results. Think of this as the BLESSING THAT YOU BRING TO EMPLOYERS. Note the examples include resurrecting failing or fledgling telecom ventures; bringing technology concepts to reality; leveraging market opportunities. If you are in an early or mid-career phase of your life, or in more of a support role, your examples might sound like this: supporting executives to be more efficient and increase their billable hours; or, calming angry customers so that they can get their needs met and the company can retain their business. Note the questions include “if you could have just one impact on your work-world, what would it be? And, what is your value proposition? In other words, I make money for my employer by, and then fill in the blank. [If group is paired up, direct pairs to share their answers. It may be more difficult for pairs to describe one another’s advantages/value if they have not shared a working relationship. If so, then the individual can talk with his or her partner about what he or she does to impact his/her workworld or make money for employers.]
  • For any of you who’d like to dig a little further into personal branding, you might enjoy some of these websites. Also, be sure to review chapter 7 of The Christian’s Career Journey for a complete chapter on the topic of branding.
  • Once you get clear on the soft and hard attributes of your personal brand and the value you bring to employers, you’ll need to be thinking about how to communicate that information throughout your job search.
  • This slide offers just a couple of examples of a brand statement. The first one, Initiate and drive game-changing strategies for big growth and business turnaround in global technology markets. Is a brand statement for a technology executive. The second one, Thought leader in California utility market, bringing clarity and consensus to complex, politically sensitive issues. Is a brand statement for a utilities expert. The final one, Discrete, intuitive admin assistant, freeing executives from the minutia to do what they do best. Is a brand statement for an administrative assistant. So you can see that these brand statements work for virtually any level of position you are targeting.
  • As part of communicating your brand, you’ll need an “elevator pitch.” We’re referring to it here as “U in 30 seconds” and, a slightly longer version of “U in 2 Minutes” This is a critical part of your job search. It demonstrates your ability to communicate effectively, gets across key job-search information quickly, and is an effective use of time in networking groups. If you can’t fit it on the form on the next slide, don’t include it!
  • Okay, here is what you need to build your “U in 30 Seconds” First off your name ... that’s easy.  Next, your label, such as Product Manager or Graphic Artist or Financial Executive. Next, the level of position you’re targeting, such as Director of Manager or Supervisor or Support. And then, the industry you are targeting, such as oil and gas, pharmaceutical, or IT. That takes care of the items on the left-hand side of the slide. Now to the right-hand side. The first item there is: Brand/Value proposition: For example, I’ve helped deliver double-digit decreases in turnover and implemented outsourcing programs that cut costs by more than 17%. Then geographic preference: Dallas area, for example. 3 Target Companies: Share with the listener three target companies you are interested in. Finally, end with a connecting comment or question, such as “What are your thoughts on the best way to learn more about issues and/or key people within those organizations?”
  • Now, let’s put it all together. This is an example of what the “U in 30 Seconds” or, your elevator pitch, might sound like. My name is Kathleen Careerist. I am a Human Resources Professional, exploring opportunities at the Director-level in the oil and gas industry. I’ve helped deliver double-digit decreases in turnover and implemented outsourcing programs that cut costs by more than 17%. I’m interested in staying in the Dallas area, and am willing to travel as needed. My target companies are ExxonMobil, Hunt Oil, and Maguire. [pause] What are your thoughts on the best way to learn more about issues and/or key people within those organizations? Notice that the final thought doesn’t say: “Do you know of any jobs in those organization?” or “Do you know who’s hiring?”
  • On the “U in 2 Minutes” you can go into a little more detail, with the potential elements include the items listed here. This expanded version can be used in response to an interviewer’s question: “Tell me about yourself.” Keep it to 400 words or fewer. And, learn it, but don’t memorize it!
  • This slide shows how the job seeker used the categories on the prior page and fleshed out his “U in 2 Minutes” response. Note how the job seeker has chosen just a few of the potential elements, but not all. This helps keep the “U in 2 Minutes” to fewer than 400 words.
  • As an action step for this week, go to the Christian Career Journey website and download and complete the form called Elements of My Mini Bio, which is quite similar to the last couple of slides we’ve looked at. Work on getting this filled out, plus the Building Blocks of Brand form we’ve looked at earlier today.
  • What questions are coming up for you based on this destination of branding and personal marketing documents? Next week we’ll be looking specifically at resumes. Keep in mind that chapter 7 of The Christian’s Career Journey covers this topic in more detail with additional explanation and resources on this topic.
  • Transcript

    • 1. The Non-Traditional Search David Hughen Founder, AustinWorkNet
    • 2. The Shift in How Business Gets Done Core Fixed Cost Operations - - -
    • 3. Core Fixed Cost Operations The Shift in How Business Gets Done - - -
    • 4. The Resource Ecosystem Contractors Interns Specialty Service Providers Consultants Partners Channel / Resellers Employee Base
    • 5. The Traditional Search <ul><li>Limit your time on traditional search activities </li></ul><ul><li>Yes …work on your resume, interview skills, networking, personal assessment, etc. </li></ul><ul><li>But why spend most of your time on… </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Job boards? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“Informational interviews”? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Want ads? </li></ul></ul>
    • 6. The Non-Traditional Search <ul><li>Instead of a job candidate – solve business problems </li></ul><ul><li>Create your brand! </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Define competencies / expertise </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Set up your LLC or sole proprietorship </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Create a simple web site </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Business cards </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Approach your supply chain, vendor network </li></ul>
    • 7. The Non-Traditional Search <ul><li>Instead of a job gap – work continuation </li></ul><ul><li>“ I’ve formed a business to provide services…” </li></ul><ul><li>Partner with other professionals with compatible skills </li></ul><ul><li>Join the Freelance Generation </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Odesk.com, eLance.com, Guru.com, Hourville.com </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Research rates charged by experienced freelancers, look at their portfolios </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Ensure your LinkedIn profile shows your current status as looking for business projects and other works </li></ul>
    • 8. The Non-Traditional Search <ul><li>Connect with a Non-Profit </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Apply your expertise to their operations </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>And…they have well-connected boards of directors </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Gain personal strength from this activity </li></ul></ul>
    • 9. Behaviors that Fit <ul><li>Humility </li></ul><ul><ul><li>There’s something greater than you </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Flexibility </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Absence of entitlement </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Resilience </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Responsive to change </li></ul></ul>
    • 10.  
    • 11.  
    • 12.  
    • 13.  
    • 14.  
    • 15. Differentiate Yourself with a Personal Brand
    • 16. <ul><li>Authentic Image </li></ul><ul><li>The genuine you, doing work you’re passionate about, in a way that sets you apart from everyone else </li></ul><ul><li>Advantages </li></ul><ul><li>This is your value proposition—what makes you able to contribute to the organization’s bottom line </li></ul>A personal brand consists of 3 A’s: <ul><li>Awareness </li></ul><ul><li>A brand must be communicated constantly and consistently … in a manner that makes people attentive and responsive to it … don’t hide your light under a bushel! </li></ul>What is a Personal Brand?
    • 17. <ul><li>Convey your value proposition and create employer desire to buy (hire) </li></ul><ul><li>Control what networking contacts and interviewers remember most about yo u </li></ul><ul><li>Lower the barriers to hiring by creating trust and conveying value </li></ul><ul><li>Differentiate you from the competition </li></ul>A compelling, cohesive career brand will help … <ul><li>Guide you in decisions about which interviews to pursue </li></ul><ul><li>Make you more attractive to employers, even when there are no formal job openings </li></ul>Why Do You Need a Personal Brand?
    • 18. Key Elements of a Brand
    • 19. <ul><li>Free archived telesummit with thought leaders on branding: www. personalbrandingsummit .com </li></ul><ul><li>Tom Peters’ article on personal branding that started it all: www. fastcompany .com/magazine/10/ brandyou .html </li></ul><ul><li>Robin Good’s 10 tips to creating a personal brand: http://brand. blogs .com/mantra/personal_brands/ </li></ul><ul><li>Dan Schwabel’s Personal Branding Blog: http:// personalbrandingblog . wordpress .com/ </li></ul><ul><li>Reach Branding Club: www. reachbrandingclub .com </li></ul><ul><li>Reach Branding Blog: www. thepersonalbrandingblog .com </li></ul>More Info on Branding
    • 20. Logomaker.com
    • 21.  
    • 22. <ul><li>Communicating Your Personal Brand </li></ul>
    • 23. <ul><li>Thought leader in California utility market, bringing clarity and consensus to complex, politically sensitive issues. </li></ul><ul><li>Discrete, intuitive admin assistant, freeing executives from the minutia to do what they do best. </li></ul><ul><li>Initiate and drive game-changing strategies for big growth and business turnaround in global technology markets. </li></ul>Branding Statements: 15 Words or Less
    • 24. <ul><li>Critical functional part of your job search. </li></ul><ul><li>Demonstrates your ability to communicate effectively. </li></ul><ul><li>Communicates job search focus information quickly. </li></ul><ul><li>Effective use of time in networking groups. </li></ul><ul><li>If it won’t fit on the form, don’t include it. </li></ul>U in 30 Seconds U in 2 Minutes
    • 25. <ul><li>Name </li></ul><ul><li>Label/Title </li></ul><ul><li>Level of Position </li></ul><ul><li>Industry </li></ul><ul><li>Brand / Value Proposition </li></ul><ul><li>Geographic Preference </li></ul><ul><li>3 Target Companies </li></ul><ul><li>Connecting Comment/Question </li></ul>U in 30 Seconds: AKA Your Elevator Pitch
    • 26. My name is Kathleen Careerist I am a Human Resources Professional , exploring opportunities at the Director level in the Oil and Gas industry. I’ve helped deliver double-digit decreases in turnover and implemented outsourcing programs that cut costs by more than 17%. I’m interested in staying in the Dallas area , and am willing to travel as needed. My target companies are ExxonMobil, Hunt Oil, and Maguire . [pause] What are your thoughts on the best way to learn more about issues and/or key people within those organizations? U in 30 Seconds: AKA Your Elevator Pitch
    • 27. <ul><li>Verbal Business Card (including what you’re looking for) </li></ul><ul><li># of Years’ Experience (optional) </li></ul><ul><li>Prestigious Employers (optional) </li></ul><ul><li>Title or Functional Area </li></ul><ul><li>Scope of Responsibility </li></ul><ul><li>3-Point Marketing Message </li></ul><ul><li>Value Proposition/Results </li></ul><ul><li>Tagline (optional) </li></ul><ul><li>Inquiry/Call to Action </li></ul><ul><li>What Happened (optional) </li></ul>Potential Elements of Mini Bio U in 2 Minutes: AKA Your Elevator Pitch Tips for U in 2 Minutes <ul><li>Use in response to “tell me about yourself” and other networking situations </li></ul><ul><li>400 words or less </li></ul><ul><li>Learn it, don’t memorize it! </li></ul>
    • 28. Verbal Business Card I ’ m a communication professional targeting director-level opportunities with industrial manufacturers where I can leverage my track record for developing award-winning creative teams and delivering record returns on marketing communications. # of Years ’ Experience (optional) Over the past 10 years, Prestigious Employers (optional) I ’ ve worked with the region ’ s leading lighting manufacturer Title or Functional Area in senior-level positions as an Advertising Manager and Director of Communications Scope of Responsibility with charge of a staff of 25 and six-figure project budgets. 3-Point Marketing Message Throughout my career as a creative director, I ’ ve been recognized for my expertise in 3 key areas: advertising strategy, project management, and creative development. Value Proposition/ Results I can offer some examples if you ’ d like. As an advertising strategist, my skills delivered an ROI of 15:1 on marketing funds, which, as you know, is well above average. As a project manager, it wasn ’ t unusual for me to save $5,000 on printing costs when our total budget was $25K. And, because of my strong creative background, many of the campaigns I directed earned national advertising awards. Tagline (optional) I ’ m known for turning ideas into dollars. Inquiry/Call to Action What companies are you aware of that are doing interesting work with their marketing communications?
    • 29. Go to www.christiancareerjourney.com/journey.html Download and Complete Elements of My Mini Bio Action Step
    • 30. Questions?

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