Chaos In Colombia
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Chaos In Colombia

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Chaos In Colombia Chaos In Colombia Presentation Transcript

  • Chaos in Colombia Russell Stewart AP World History
  • Power Struggle
    • Colombia faces an uphill struggle for power between Marxist Rebels, drug cartels, and an insufficient Democratic government under President Andres Pastrana
  • Colombian Government
    • The Colombian government is directed by an elected president
    • Since the 1970’s Colombian government has struggled with lenient treatment of guerrillas and drug traffickers or harsh clean-up tactics
    • Increased violence results from increased government intervention
    • The Columbian government has been aided by the United States in an effort to curb drug trafficking
    • Death, destruction, violence, and devastation has resulted from the intense struggle
  • Disorder
    • Extreme poverty and insufficient aid for emergency victims results in lawlessness and looting
    • Colombia is home to some of the most sophisticated and violent drug trafficking in the world
    • Drug cartels yield immense wealth and hold tremendous influence in Columbian society
    Rioting and looting takes place following devastation from an earthquake. Police struggle to maintain order.
  • Drug Cartels
    • Colombia has unmistakably become the drug trafficking capital of the world
    • Drug operations span over several nations and carry vast wealth
    • Drug traffickers market to the United States and use high-tech methods of smuggling including private airplanes and even submarines
    • The two largest and most feared of the cartels were the rival Medellin and Cali cartels—both were defeated in 1990’s and have been fragmented into smaller, less visible organizations
  • Marxist guerrillas
    • The Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) was formed in 1964 as a military wing for the Colombian Communist Party
    • FARC uses terrorist tactics to manipulate the weak Democratic government
    • FARC recruits young Colombians to serve in its ranks—it is estimated that 30% of the organization’s fighters are younger than 18
    • Columbian government has attempted to negotiate with the guerrillas in return for voice in government—no significant solutions have been settled
    FARC is extremely well-organized and well-funded. It is suspected that FARC is aided by outside benefactors
  • FARC-Cartel Connection
    • There is a well-established link between FARC armed guerrillas and drug cartel operations
    • FARC offers military protection for drug fields, labs, and smugglers
    • Drug traffickers pay a tax to FARC in return for the protection
    FARC soldier patrols a poppy field
  • Why?
    • Colombia obtained independence from Spain in 1824
    • Political struggle between Conservatives and Liberals prevented order from being established
    • Ultimately, extreme poverty and the inability of government to provide basic assistance led to the rise and establishment of rebel groups and illegal activities
    Simon Bolivar led the Colombian independence movement in 1824
  • Solution?
    • The problems facing Colombia are too deeply-rooted to be solved without outside aid
    • We must demand that our government continue to help the Colombian efforts to clean-up the chaos that exists today
    • The violence and disorder often violate basic human rights that should be protected by the international community
    The UN should bear the brunt on the international aid provided to Colombia in its efforts to restore order
  • References
    • &quot;The Colombian Cartels.&quot; Front Line: Drug Wars . 2008. pbs. 27 May 2009 <http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/shows/drugs/business/inside/colombian.html>.
    • McDermott, Jeremy. &quot;Riots erupt as Colombia pyramid schemes collapse .&quot; Telegraph.co.uk . 13 NOV 2008. 27 May 2009 <http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/southamerica/colombia/3454052/Riots-erupt-as-Colombia-pyramid-schemes-collapse.html>.
    • Davison, Phil. &quot;Colombia: From tragedy to chaos.&quot; The Independent . 31 JAN 1999. Independent News and Media Limited. 27 May 2009 <http://www.independent.co.uk/news/colombia-from-tragedy-to-chaos-1077469.html>. &quot;Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia.“
    • GlobalSecurity.org . 25 JUN 2008. 27 May 2009 <http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/world/para/farc.htm>.