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Dd114 spring2010 class10

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  • In a series for New York Amusements, a free weekly publication listing current shows, Hirschfeld designed his drawings to feature a portrait of a performer alongside a scene from his or her current success. This line is influenced by the thin French line Hirschfeld discovered in Parisian illustrated magazines and in the work of noted American illustrator John Held, Jr., with whom he worked alongside at MGM's publicity department in the late 1920s.
  • At this stage of his career, Hirschfeld was more interested in design than in capturing the character of a performer. In this portrait of Jane Cowl the jagged line that Covarrubias frequently employed reveals the electricity of Cowl's performance. Cowl was a leading lady of the American theater in the 1920s and 1930s and she frequently starred in revivals of perhaps her greatest role, in Robert Sherwood's The Road to Rome.
  • Hirschfeld "Hirschfelds" himself, applying his signature style to a self-portrait, as he has done periodically throughout his career. With great confidence and grace he employs sweeping abstract lines to define the upper body, animated shorter strokes to delineate an expression of bemused serenity.
  • As the New York Times introduced color into its pages, it has frequently asked Hirschfeld to supply paintings rather than drawings. Although he has drawn Liza Minnelli nearly twenty times in the last thirty-five years, in this recent work he creates a timeless, riveting summation of her style, evoking the lively, colorful caricatures of jazz greats he created for Seventeen magazine in the 1940s.
  • George PriceIncreasing divorce rates, women's liberation, and society's emphasis on sexuality in the 1970s led many Americans to reconsider the institution of marriage. George Price (1901-1995) uses his angular, almost cubist style to lampoon women going to great lengths to keep the spark in their relationships with men. In this gag cartoon, the unsuspecting husband walks through the door moments before his equally aged wife dressed in a Playboy bunny outfit and high heels surprises him. Price, a cartoonist with the New Yorker from 1932 to 1995, once said, "If the situation is funny enough it shouldn't require a line."
  • George PriceIncreasing divorce rates, women's liberation, and society's emphasis on sexuality in the 1970s led many Americans to reconsider the institution of marriage. George Price (1901-1995) uses his angular, almost cubist style to lampoon women going to great lengths to keep the spark in their relationships with men. In this gag cartoon, the unsuspecting husband walks through the door moments before his equally aged wife dressed in a Playboy bunny outfit and high heels surprises him. Price, a cartoonist with the New Yorker from 1932 to 1995, once said, "If the situation is funny enough it shouldn't require a line."
  • Relationships between men and women provided fodder for many gag cartoons, especially in the adult magazines published by Timely Features. The sharp-nosed secretary scorns her boss and he scolds her for failing to come to work on time. Her dress, inappropriate for work in the world of the 1950s, titillates. Thomas Jefferson Machamer (1900-1960) began publishing his cartoons and illustrations as a teenager and had a dual career with both mainstream periodicals and newspapers as well as adult publications. He drew the popular comic strip Gags and Gals for the New York Mirror and the Baffles for the Los Angeles Times.
  • Rober
  • With its subversive humor and delightful wit, the series has made an indelible imprint on American pop culture, and the family members have become television iconsTHE SIMPSONS is a Gracie Films production in association with 20th Century Fox Television. James L. Brooks, Matt Groening and Al Jean are the executive producers. Film Roman, a Starz Media company, is the animation house. Mike B. Anderson serves as the supervising animation director.

Transcript

  • 1. Digital Illustration
    Political Characterizations & Editorial Cartoons
  • 2. Last Class
    Talked about Editorial Cartoons & Political Satire
  • 3. Today’s Class
    A look at Cartoons
    In-Class Flash Studio
  • 4. Homework
    On-line Comic Project: Create an on-line project in Flash and put it up on the Web.
  • 5. Eric Dressler in Excess Baggage,
    1928
    Ink and ink wash on board
    Published in
    New York Amusements,
    May 13, 1928
    Prints and Photographs Division (8)
    Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Al Hirschfeld
    LC-USZ62-124463
  • 6. Jane Cowl in The Road To Rome,
    1928
    Ink on layered paper board
    Published in
    New York Amusements,
    June 11, 1928
    Caroline and Erwin Swann
    Memorial Fund Purchase
    Prints and Photographs Division (20)
    LC-USZ62-127469
  • 7. Self-Portrait, ca. 1970
    Black ink over pencil on illustration board
    Caroline and Erwin Swann Collection of Caricature and Cartoon
    Prints and Photographs Division (15)
    LC-USZ62-84068
  • 8. Liza Minnelli in
    Minnelli On Minnelli,
    1999
    Lithographic reproduction
    Prints and Photographs Division (16)
    Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Al Hirschfeld
    LC-USZ62-127467
  • 9. Oh, boy! Everybody's gone . . . what a chance to take a nice,
    hot relaxing bath, August 18, 1968
    India ink over graphite underdrawing with paste-ons
    on layered paper board (26)
    LC-USZ62-126613
  • 10.
  • 11. Housewife, wearing bunny cocktail outfit, greets husband with a drink as he enters the front door, 1971.
    George Price
    Published without caption in the New Yorker, January 15, 1972.
    Watercolor and ink brush with white out over graphite underdrawing.
    Art Wood Collection of Cartoon and Caricature
    Prints and Photographs Division
    LC-DIG-ppmsca-03305 (26)
    © 1971, New Yorker, reproduced courtesy of Cartoonbank
  • 12.
  • 13. "I would just like to spend a night with you to find out what makes you late every morning!" between 1950 and 1960. Wash and ink. Published by Timely Features, Inc.
    Jefferson Machamer
    Art Wood Collection of Cartoon and Caricature
    Prints and Photographs Division
    LC-DIG-ppmsca-09115 (37)
  • 14.
  • 15. Beetle Bailey
  • 16. Cathy by Cathy Guisewite
  • 17. The Far Side by Gary Larson
  • 18. Calvin and Hobbes by Bill Watterson
  • 19. The Flintstones by Hanna Barbera
  • 20. The Jetsonsby Hanna Barbera
  • 21. Batman the Animated Series & Batman comics
  • 22. Robert Crumb
    Illustrator behind Fritz the Cat & American Splendor
  • 23. American Splendor
    Stories by Harvey Pekar
    Illustrations by Robert Crumb
  • 24. The Simpsons
    James L. Brooks, Matt Groening and Al Jean are the executive producers.
  • 25. South Park
    Matt Parker & Trey Stone, Creators
  • 26. Inspiration & References
    http://www.gocomics.com/
  • 27. Using Flash
    Why would we want to use Flash?
    Animation
    Interactivity
    Different tools for illustration
    Let’s take a look at illustrating with Flash together.
  • 28. Homework
    6 Unique Idea Sketches
    Choose 1 and illustrate in Flash
    We will see progress next week and continue discussions about simple animation techniques
  • 29. Extra Credit
    Alphabet Illustration.
    26 Letters of the Alphabet.
    Illustrate each one.
    Raise your grade up to 7 points.
    You must meet with me.
    Due the last day of class (not the final presentation day)