Rethinking the Role and Funding of Academic Book Publishing – Frances Pinter

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Tools of Change – Frances Pinter – Feb 24, 2010
Rethinking the Role and Funding of Academic Book Publishing

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Rethinking the Role and Funding of Academic Book Publishing – Frances Pinter

  1. 1. Rethinking the Role<br />and Funding ofAcademic Book Publishing<br />Frances Pinter<br />Publisher, Bloomsbury Academic<br />bloomsburyacademic.com<br />
  2. 2.
  3. 3.
  4. 4. The<br />Gutenberg Press<br />
  5. 5.
  6. 6.
  7. 7.
  8. 8. Quality creation is not without cost<br />
  9. 9. Funding Issues:<br />Monographs - an endangered species <br />
  10. 10. Print Runs for Academic Books<br />3000<br />2000<br />1000<br />350<br />1980<br />1990<br />2000<br />2010<br />
  11. 11. Humanitiesand <br />Social Sciences (HSS)<br />
  12. 12. The Challenge:<br />How to fund <br />sustainable<br />open access<br />for scholarly books<br />‘the Long Form Publication’<br />
  13. 13. STM journal open access model?<br />NO<br />
  14. 14. STM journal open access model?<br />Getting to ‘first copy’ costs are too high<br />HSS research budgets are too small<br />
  15. 15. New BUSINESS MODEL<br />
  16. 16. What does the Academic Community still want from the old publishing model?<br />
  17. 17. Independent verificationof quality<br />
  18. 18. Branding<br />and<br />visibility<br />
  19. 19. Editing and typesetting<br />Availability <br />in a variety of formats<br />
  20. 20. MarketingandSelling<br />
  21. 21. Curation<br />
  22. 22.
  23. 23. UC Berkeley Study:<br />Assessing the Future Landscape of Scholarly Communication<br />
  24. 24. Problems with migrating to the fully paid-for eBook model:<br />Amazon Kindle<br />Sony eBook Reader<br />Barnes & Noble Nook<br />CybookOpus BeBook<br />ItalicaeReader<br />EgriverTouch<br />iLiadeReader<br />Elonex<br />
  25. 25. Even the Apple iPadwon’t save us<br />
  26. 26. Pressures on Academic <br />Community<br />
  27. 27. Expanding Academic Ecosystem<br />
  28. 28.
  29. 29.
  30. 30. Return on investment<br />
  31. 31. Pressures on Academic <br />Publishers<br />
  32. 32. Technology driven changes =<br />$<br />
  33. 33.
  34. 34. Authors still want services & royalties<br />and now<br />‘Free at the point of use’<br />
  35. 35. Responses to this Pressure:<br />
  36. 36. Publishers racing to invest in new digital systems<br />$$$<br />
  37. 37. New Business ModelsNew Partners<br />
  38. 38.
  39. 39.
  40. 40.
  41. 41. Death to the New Models!<br />ALA meeting Jan 2010:<br />reality check<br />
  42. 42. OAPEN CHANGE<br />List 6-7 partners form lower down page make close up of page<br />
  43. 43.
  44. 44.
  45. 45. Plain<br />Vanilla<br />Ice Cream<br />
  46. 46.
  47. 47. Ice Cream<br />Cone<br />
  48. 48.
  49. 49.
  50. 50.
  51. 51. Ice Cream<br />Sundae<br />
  52. 52.
  53. 53.
  54. 54. The Bloomsbury AcademicDigital Café<br />
  55. 55. An experimental lab <br />Tools for collaboration<br />Added value<br />CC Licensing <br />Monetize<br />The Bloomsbury AcademicDigital Café<br />
  56. 56.
  57. 57. Doesn’t reduce getting to first copy costs<br />Duplicates the worst of distribution issues<br />and too many middlemen<br />
  58. 58. Greco and Wharton:<br />University presses & open access<br />
  59. 59.
  60. 60. Funding Bodies<br />Libraries<br />Academics<br />Publishers<br />
  61. 61. New Pathways for Existing Funds<br />
  62. 62. Where is the Funding to be Found?<br />
  63. 63. Research budgets?<br />NOtoo small<br />
  64. 64. Central university funds?<br />NOtoo many other demands<br />
  65. 65. Library budgets?<br />YES!<br />
  66. 66. Rethink how libraries spend their book budgets<br />
  67. 67.
  68. 68.
  69. 69.
  70. 70. Create the International Library Coalition for Open Access Books (ILCOAb)<br />
  71. 71. Build on existing library consortia<br />
  72. 72. ILCOAb to <br />aggregate funds from libraries<br />
  73. 73. Pay for fixed first copy costs & open access<br />
  74. 74. ILCOAb Model<br />Publishers submit titles to ILCOAb<br />ILCOAb decides what to ‘purchase’<br />Publishers get to first copy stage<br />Publish as open access<br />Publishers sell content in print, e-formats etc<br />
  75. 75. Monographs<br />$2 a copy?<br />
  76. 76. OLD Print Model<br />A typical monograph:<br />400 copies sold to libraries <br />@ $80 per book<br />
  77. 77. OLD Print Model<br /> $<br />First copy costs 10,000<br />Print/bind, marketing/selling<br />Distrib, royalties, profit14,000Library Suppliers cut 8,000<br />Total cost to libraries 32,000<br />
  78. 78. OLD Print Model<br />Getting to first copy cost represents 31% of price paid by the library<br />
  79. 79. OLD Print Model<br />With our $80 book <br />the library pays $55 (69%) for <br />post ‘first copy’ costs <br />
  80. 80. OLD Print Model<br />Worldwide market for HSS monographs = 10,000 libraries<br />Print reaches 4% of market<br />
  81. 81. OLD Print Model<br />Market skimming<br />Market failure<br />
  82. 82. ILCOAb Model<br />If 4% (400 libraries) join ILCOAb cost of getting to digital file = $25 ea<br />69% reduction on a print copy<br />
  83. 83. ILCOAb Model<br />If 10% (1000 libraries) join ILCOAband pay $10 per title<br />87.5% reduction per title<br />
  84. 84. ILCOAb Model<br />If 50% (5000 libraries) join ILCOAband pay $2 per title<br />97.5% reduction per title<br />
  85. 85. Why Not?<br />Free-rider argument <br />Add extra metadata for members<br />
  86. 86. Why Not?<br />Free-rider argument <br />Add extra metadata for members<br />Erosion of selection control<br />Consortia already purchase content<br />
  87. 87. International Coalition of Library Consortia<br />Over 200 library consortia members around the world<br />
  88. 88. Benefits to Scholars<br />More monographs published<br />Publishing expertise maintained<br />Full open access<br />
  89. 89. Benefits to Publishers<br />Stay in business<br />Secure a strand of work<br />Concentrate on providing added value<br />
  90. 90. Conceptual mind shifts<br />Uncouple <br />getting to first copy from other publishing functions and income streams <br />
  91. 91. Conceptual mind shifts<br />Redefine the publishing function within the Scholarly Communications Ecosystem - beyond the traditional and into the future<br />
  92. 92. Conclusion<br />Make better use of funds already available<br />
  93. 93. The ILCOAbBUSINESS MODEL<br />a Way Forward<br />

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