sacrament of reconciliation

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  • The Catechism of the Catholic Church says in paragraph 1446 that, 'Christ instituted the sacrament of Penance for all sinful members of his Church: above all for those who, since Baptism, have fallen into grave sin, and have thus lost their baptismal grace and wounded ecclesial communion. It is to them that the sacrament of Penance offers a new possibility to convert and to recover the grace of justification. The Fathers of the Church present this sacrament as 'the second plank [of salvation] after the shipwreck which is the loss of grace.''

    According to Pope John Paul II the Catechism of the Catholic Church 'is given as a sure and authentic reference text for teaching Catholic doctrine.'
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sacrament of reconciliation

  1. 1. Sin is the deliberate choice of something opposed to God's law of love in one's thoughts, words or deeds. God loves us and desires our holiness. He wants to give himself to us, but we say "no" to him through our sins. Sin is its own worst punishment. There are two kinds of sin: mortal and venial. Mortal (or serious) sin destroys love. It turns one away from God and community. It is a grave violation of God's law. In order for a sin to be mortal, the sinful act must be serious; the person had to have understood that it was seriously wrong; and the person had to have been free in committing a sin. So I cannot commit a mortal sin if the matter is not serious, if I did not know what I was doing, or if I did not act in full freedom. Venial sin is a minor offense against God that hurts our friendship with him but does not destroy it.
  2. 2. When man sins, something is lost, for mortal man, it is lost for at least the duration of the mortal existence. This does not presuppose repentance. Repentance is real, but it does not remove from us the effects of our actions, our habits. What is lost? What is lost is the purity we brought to mortality, and it is the function of the atonement, at a later time it seems, to purge from us these evil "effects". What is lost is a human being who is changed by the sin, who is no longer able to say to himself and God, "I have never sinned that sin," who will not be able, at least in this life, to forget the fact that he did commit sin. What is lost is a man who, having committed adultery for example, though fully repentant and forgiven, will be more tempted to do it again than had he never committed the sin at all; thus the struggle now becomes more difficult. It is like a man climbing a mountain, who, allowing Satan to get one of his hooks into his back with an added weight, will still be able to climb the mountain, but only with increased effort. When man sins, something is lost, for mortal man, it is lost for at least the duration of the mortal existence. This does not presuppose repentance. Repentance is real, but it does not remove from us the effects of our actions, our habits. What is lost? What is lost is the purity we brought to mortality, and it is the function of the atonement, at a later time it seems, to purge from us these evil "effects". What is lost is a human being who is changed by the sin, who is no longer able to say to himself and God, "I have never sinned that sin," who will not be able, at least in this life, to forget the fact that he did commit sin. What is lost is a man who, having committed adultery for example, though fully repentant and forgiven, will be more tempted to do it again than had he never committed the sin at all; thus the struggle now becomes more difficult. It is like a man climbing a mountain, who, allowing Satan to get one of his hooks into his back with an added weight, will still be able to climb the mountain, but only with increased effort.
  3. 3. Repent! Repent! Repent!
  4. 4. Do I really need to repent??!!
  5. 5. Reconciliation (or “Confession”) is the sacrament where Baptized Catholics receive forgiveness from God’s mercy for the offense committed against him, and are reconciled with the Church which they have wounded by their sins. It is the place where you meet the risen Jesus, who gave the apostles - the first priests - the power to forgive sins in his name (John 20:23).
  6. 6. it's why Jesus died, so that we can be reconciled to the living God. His death established a new covenant between God and man. Not only are we forgiven of our offenses by His great love and mercy, but we are also adopted. Our identity and a new life are now found through Him. We are called into a relationship, not a religion. This is the core tenet of being a Christian.
  7. 7. As an aspect of our interactions with other people, Christians strive to maintain harmony and to forgive others. It is a free will act of love; an expression of it. This does not imply that they are accepting of all behaviors. They will take a stand against those things which are not right and against people who desire to do wrong or evil. They do that because of their love for other people.
  8. 8. Only Baptized Catholics can receive the sacrament of confession. If you are not Catholic but would like to learn more about the Catholic faith, speak to a priest. He will be glad to answer your questions.
  9. 9. All Catholics, including priests, bishops and even the pope, are required to go to confession at least one a year. However, frequent confession (at least monthly) is highly recommended. Pope John Paul II even highly recommended the practice of weekly confession, which he followed himself. He said that “it would be an illusion to seek after holiness without partaking frequently of this sacrament of conversion and reconciliation.” If you would like to receive the sacrament, simply ask a priest and he will help you. All Catholics, including priests, bishops and even the pope, are required to go to confession at least one a year. However, frequent confession (at least monthly) is highly recommended. Pope John Paul II even highly recommended the practice of weekly confession, which he followed himself. He said that “it would be an illusion to seek after holiness without partaking frequently of this sacrament of conversion and reconciliation.” If you would like to receive the sacrament, simply ask a priest and he will help you.
  10. 10. If you have committed a serious (mortal) sin, it is very important to go to confession as soon as possible. Anyone who has committed a mortal sin cannot receive communion until he/she has first gone to confession and received God’s forgiveness, since receiving communion in a state of serious sin does not bring grace but judgment (1 Cor 11:27-30). For example, a Catholic who has deliberately missed Mass on Saturday/Sunday or on a day of obligation without a serious reason should first go to confession before he again receives communion, since Sunday (or Saturday evening) Mass attendance is obligatory for Catholics.
  11. 11. SIN?
  12. 12. Keys. A single key or a pair of keys, usually crisscrossed in the shape of an “X,” occasionally one of top of the other, is the most common symbol for the Sacrament of Reconciliation. The symbol originates with Jesus’ words to Peter, “I will give you the keys to the kingdom of heaven” (Mt 16:19a), by which Jesus imparted his authority to the Church, and his continuing statement, “Whatever you bind on earth shall be bound in heaven, and whatever you loose on earth shall be loosed in heaven” (Mt 16:19b), by which he established the Sacrament of Reconciliation and gave the Church the authority to forgive sins. (see also Jn 20:23).
  13. 13. A Stole. The stole is the primary symbol of the ordained priesthood, and it is the priest in personal Christi, as a representative of Christ, who grants sacramental absolution. A stole is a long, narrow strip of cloth worn over the shoulders which hangs in front in equal lengths on the right and left sides. The stole signifies the priest’s authority to preside over the sacraments in general, and his authority to absolve sins in particular. When a priest hears confessions, he wears a purple stole which symbolizes repentance and sorrow.
  14. 14. A Raised Hand. During the Rite of Reconciliation, after the penitent makes the Act of Contrition, the priests offers the Prayer of Absolution, the blessing that removes the person’s sins, and as he does so he extends his right hand over the penitent’s head.
  15. 15. The Cross. The priest makes a Sign of the Cross over the penitent as he recites the final words of the Prayer of Absolution, “And I absolve you from you sins in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit.” Jesus “himself bore our sins in his body upon the Cross” (1 Pt 2:24a). Jesus has reconciled all things through himself, and he has made peace by the blood of his Cross (Col 1:20).
  16. 16. A Scourging Whip. Before Jesus, our Suffering Servant, was crucified, he was scourged at the pillar. “He was crushed for our sins, by his stripes we were healed; through his suffering, my servant shall justify many, and their guilt he shall bear; he shall take away the sins of many, and win pardon for their offenses” (Is 53:5,11,12). The apostle Peter reflected, “By his [Jesus’] wounds we were healed” (1 Pt 2:24b).
  17. 17. Sinner!!!
  18. 18. Now, always remember to be good! Now, always remember to be good! God loves you! God loves you!
  19. 19. • http ://www.israelcatholic.com/content/view /37/106/lang,en/ • http://www.ststephenchurch.org/Sacra ments/rec_overview/rec_symbols.shtml • http://www.catholic- pages.com/morality/sin.asp • http://answers.yahoo.com/question/ind ex?qid=20080322102740AAJ9BaY

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