Parks of London
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Parks of London

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Parks of London Parks of London Presentation Transcript

  • Anastasia Mukharjamova 08.04.2008 Parks of London
    • Content:
    • Richmond Park
    • Bushy Park
    • The Regent's Park
    • Hyde Park
    • Princess Diana's Memorial Fountain
    • Greenwich Park
    • St James ’ s Park
  • Richmond Park Richmond Park, at almost 1000 hectares (2500 acres), is the largest Royal Park in London and is home to around 650 free roaming deer. The pastoral landscape of hills, woodlands, ponds, gardens and grasslands set amongst ancient trees offers a peaceful respite to visitors. The Park is designated as a National Nature Reserve (NNR), a Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) and a Special Area of Conservation (SAC).
  • Bushy Park With an area of 445 hectares (1,099 acres) . Bushy is the second largest of the Royal Parks. Bushy Park has a distinctive landscape, shaped in part by its history as a royal hunting ground but also by its many ponds and streams. It includes fishing and model boating ponds, horse rides, formal plantations of trees and other plants, wildlife conservation areas and herds of both Red deer and Fallow deer.
  • The Regent's Park Regent's Park, 166 hectares (410 acres), includes stunning rose gardens with more than 30,000 roses of 400 varieties. The Park is the largest outdoor sports area in London with 'The Hub' a community sports pavilion and sports pitches.
  • Hyde Park Hyde Park is one of the largest parks in central London famous for its Speakers’ Corner and a memorial to Diana, Princess of Wales. With over 4,000 trees, a lake, a meadow, horse rides Hyde Park landscapes cover 142 hectares (350 acres).
  • Princess Diana's Memorial Fountain This unique Memorial to Diana, Princess of Wales was opened on 6th July 2004. Made with beautiful Cornish granite, the oval fountain's waters flow in two streams, cascading down to a still pool. Visitors are free to sit on the Memorial and dip their hands and feet in the water.
  • The Memorial also symbolizes Diana's quality and openness. There are three bridges where people can cross the water and go right to the heart of the fountain.
  • Greenwich Park Covering 74 hectares (183 acres) Greenwich is the oldest enclosed Royal Park and home to a small herd of fallow and red deer. Situated on top of a hill, visitors enjoy sweeping views across the River Thames to St Paul's Cathedral and beyond. The park is part of the Greenwich World Heritage Site, host to the Prime Meridian Line and the old Royal Observatory, as well as having the National Maritime Museum as a neighbor.
  • St James ’ s Park With its royal, political and literary associations, park is at the very heart of London and covers 23 hectares (58 acres). With a lake harboring ducks, geese and pelicans. St James's is also home to the Mall, the setting for many ceremonial parades and events of national celebration.
  • The Green Park The Green Park is the smallest of the eight Royal Parks and one of the busiest. Covering 19 hectares (47 acres) The Green Park is quite different from its neighbor St James's Park. It is more peaceful, with mature trees and grassland. It is bordered by Constitution Hill, Piccadilly and Queen's Walk.
  • The Park's primary role is as a peaceful refuge for people living, working or visiting Central London, and is particularly popular for sunbathing and picnics in fine weather. It is also popular as a healthy walking route to work for commuters. The paths are used extensively by joggers and runners.