iVeggie Conceptual Slide

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  • great use of technology. the only advice i have is to think about 'simplicity' - maybe start small, and build it up - when you have so many pieces, you don't know what's working and what's not working. just my 2 cents.
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iVeggie Conceptual Slide

  1. 1. iVeggie A conceptual design by Yin Yin Wu and Rosemary Ehlers Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu Design Challenge To encourage users to introduce vegetables to one meal every day Time limit: 2 weeks
  2. 2. iVeggie <ul><li>Persuasive Purpose </li></ul><ul><ul><li>To encourage users to add vegetables to one meal each day </li></ul></ul>Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu <ul><li>Industrial Design </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Use facebook mobile's iPhone application to encourage users to upload photos of their meals with delicious and nutritious vegetables. </li></ul></ul>
  3. 3. <ul><ul><li>Jennifer has an iPhone that she can't live without. Jennifer enjoys eating great food and loves sharing pictures of what she eats on facebook. Although Jennifer wants to eat more vegetables, she always forgets to add them to her meals. </li></ul></ul>Meet Jennifer Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu
  4. 4. iVeggie’s Story Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu Dave is hungry! It must be time for lunch, so he goes to the dining hall to get some food. Dave loads up on his favorite foods, but remembers he needs to find a certain kind of food to photograph with his iPhone, as part of a wacky and fun project. That’s right, he needs a vegetable. He’s never been really into vegetables, but he picks one he sorta likes and loads it onto his plate. He discovers he can make a Jenga game out of carrot sticks, and takes a photo of his nutritious creation. He posts it on Facebook and tags it with the name of the project, so that everyone else can see his fun photo. Using the Facebook Mobile app, sharing his photo takes only 30 seconds. While he’s posting his photo, he sees someone else has also posted a photo, and is inspired to try broccoli during dinner. iVeggie – unlike Mom, we want you to play with your food. Make every meal an adventure!
  5. 5. Prototype of iVeggie Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu Step 1: With an iphone, you can easily take a picture of your meal and upload it to facebook with one click. Step 2: Loading the image onto facebook insures accountability and allows you to share the meal with friends. Step 3: Tag iVeggie in the photo Step 4: Win cool prizes for having the most fun with your veggies!
  6. 6. Features/Functionality <ul><ul><li>How it works </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Eat - Take a picture of your meal! </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Share - Upload photo onto Facebook and tag as ‘iVeggie’ – Facebook Mobile on the iPhone is an easy way to do this instantaneously. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Win - iVeggie will give prizes at the end of the study for the person who ate the most veggies, the person with the best veggie picture, and the person with the most exotic or unexpected vegetable on their plate. </li></ul></ul>Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu <ul><ul><li>iVeggie will be the Facebook friend who helps you </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>eat your veggies. </li></ul></ul>
  7. 7. Theoretical Justifications <ul><ul><li>Simple : iVeggie only asks users to add one veggie to their plate for one meal . The smallest step that matters is simple and easy to adopt. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Fun : iVeggie latches onto a popular Facebook meme to take photos of your meal to make vegetables fun. iVeggige turns veggie eating into more than just eating. It turns each meal into an expression of yourself by allowing you to take artistic photos of your food and share it with the world. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Social : iVeggie allows you to be part of a Facebook community of users who are all committed to eating more vegetables. You never have to feel like you are alone in developing this habit and can look towards the vegetable photos that others have posted as inspirations for your next meal. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Paradigm shift : iVeggie changes the way you view vegetables. By adding the photo contest, we make eating vegetables fun. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Accountability : The photo requirements for iVeggie insures that the user is eating the vegetable. It’s a simple accountability mechanism that helps people abide by their commitment. </li></ul></ul>Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu
  8. 8. User Testing Design <ul><ul><li>Qualitative feedback </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>User feedback: Did the facebook community of iVeggie photos encourage users to eat more vegetables? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Photo variety: Did users express their creativity through the foods? Distinguish between photos because it was required vs. photos taken because the users enjoyed the task. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Quantitative feedback </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Study Abidance: How many users took a picture at each meal and uploaded the photo onto facebook? Average number of days users continued study. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Vegetable Consumption: Average increase in number of veggies eaten at each meal. </li></ul></ul>Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu
  9. 9. Shortcomings of Design <ul><ul><li>Too complicated: The process of friending iVeggie, uploading the photo, and tagging the photo may deter users from continuing the project in the long term </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Limited to iPhone users: Habit formation process requires users to have easy access to a smart phone capable of taking pictures. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Requires people to have access to vegetables: Users may have limited vegetable options and lack variety in their photos. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Repetitive –after a week or other period of time, the novelty of the study may wane and users may find themselves bored with the creative challenge, leading them to forget or drop the study altogether. </li></ul></ul>Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu
  10. 10. Expansion - What else is possible? <ul><ul><li>Build a community </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>By requiring all users to friend iVeggie, we make it easy to find all the pictures taken for the study we encourage people to see what pictures other people have taken. With this data, we can easily build a vibrant community of veggie eaters. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Redefine a culture </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Vegetables are often portrayed as gross, a chore, etc. Through this study, however, we encourage people to find something fun or beautiful in vegetables –and we hope this shift in perception will have a beneficial impact on whether people think they like vegetables or not. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Other features and interactions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Other photo challenges –take a photo of someone else eating veggies, draw a picture using veggies, have as many different colors on your plate as possible, team challenges, personal challenges from one user to another, etc. </li></ul></ul></ul>Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu
  11. 11. Next Steps in Design Process <ul><ul><li>Needs finding- Send survey to perspective study participants to get their thoughts on the following areas: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Determine whether monetary prizes will motivate users or decrease motivation by reducing the moral commitment they make to eating vegetables </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Current vegetable consumption </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Rapid Prototype </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Test out the proof of concept by creating iVeggie profile and recruiting participants to tag iVeggie in the photos </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>User Testing of iVeggie with our target audience </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Product Iteration </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Identify the most effective way to remind users to take a photo of their meal. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Identify the most effective way to motivate users to continue commitment to the study. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Product Development </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Incorporate user testing results to improve the response rate of iVeggie </li></ul></ul></ul>Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu
  12. 12. Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu Evaluation of Design Project How well does the idea reflect concepts from class? 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 How well does the design match the design brief? 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 How viable/convincing is the proposed solution? 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
  13. 13. Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu Evaluation continued… How well could this solution scale to reach many? 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 How well does this document communicate? 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Bonus Points How insightful is the proposed solution? 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
  14. 14. Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu Additional Comments: We were specifically wondering whether we should restrict our user group to people who eat in dining halls/people who cook for themselves. On the one hand, we did not want to restrict the pool of potential subjects –on the other hand, restricting the environment might make it clearer what some of the obstructions to vegetable consumption are, and make it easier to adapt to any changes we will have to make. We’d really like people’s thoughts on this!

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