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Final Portfolio and Self Evaluation   Denise Clarke-Hang
 

Final Portfolio and Self Evaluation Denise Clarke-Hang

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    Final Portfolio and Self Evaluation   Denise Clarke-Hang Final Portfolio and Self Evaluation Denise Clarke-Hang Document Transcript

    • Running Head: MULTICULTURAL ADVISING PORTFOLIO Multicultural Advising Portfolio Denise Clarke-Hang May 1, 2010 Kansas State University EDCEP 851 MULTICULTURAL ASPECTS OF ACADEMIC ADVISING Doris Wright Carroll, Ph.D., Associate Professor Reference No. 20596 3 hours graduate credit Spring 2010 My Multicultural Chinese-Caucasian Blended Family Website built with Multicultual pictures and other information about Multicultural Advising: http://multicultural.carbonmade.com/ Outline for Portfolio Multicultural Advising Portfolio Outline (Page Numbers)
    • 2 MULTICULTURAL ADVISING PORTFOLIO 1. Outline page 2 2. Portfolio objectives page 3 Provides evidence of the following areas: 3. Operational definition of advising page 4 4. Personal Background page 5 5. Privilege Awareness page 7 6. Advising self-awareness page 9 7. Specific Populations (Institutional climate and Advising Services) page 10 8. Retention page 11 9. Academic curricula page 13 10. St. Gianna Catholic Health Academy Curriculum page 14 11. Multicultural Portfolio Course Conclusion page 14 12. Refernces page 18 12. Multicultural Advising Portfolio Self-Assessment page 20 • Alex Clarke with his cousin Lisa Hang • Portfolio Objectives
    • 3 MULTICULTURAL ADVISING PORTFOLIO As the director/instructor of the St. Gianna Catholic Health Academy, I advise students on a daily basis about careers in health care. My goal is to give advice to best direct students towards their goals and aspirations. It has difficulty at times to relate and discuss some of these career paths and planning with my Asian and African American students due to a disconnect culturally. Relating to the students and their cultural as a mentor is important to me as an instructor. I am working towards a better understanding to close the gap between my students, their parents, and myself to better advise them when it comes to their life goals while keeping being personal and culturally aware in my approach for each individual student. On a personal level through continued study and dedication I would like to gain a greater sensitivity and understanding of my own family’s diverse background with my husband being Chinese born in Vietnam, my daughter being Chinese/American, my son being a child of divorce living between two houses, and myself raised in an upper middle class family with a sheltered upbringing. One of my goals is to help my family embrace our similarities and differences so we can continue to grow together. I also am aware that being culturally aware will help my children as they enter school and move forward in their education. My goal is to find enlightenment on how to close the gap in cultural differences to better work with my husband, children, students, parents, etc. despite our different upbringings through life’s journeys. St. Gianna Catholic Health Academy Students on Surgery Rotation at Hospital Operational Definition of Multicultural Advising When a person raised in a middle class rural family first thinks of advising they think in terms “the American way.” The advisor thinks of how to help advise the student in finding their own independence and success apart from their nuclear family. However when to be a true diversity a fair advisor must think in terms of multicultural advising. Multicultural advising does
    • 4 MULTICULTURAL ADVISING PORTFOLIO not just include students that have immigrated to America or of a different race than the advisor. A good multicultural advisor is trained to think in terms of not only race, but of gender, divorce, disability, and blended families. Our text book defines multicultural advising as addressing the needs of an ever- increasing minority student population (Watson, Terrell, and Wright, 2002). This growing population needs to be supported morally, spiritually, intellectually, socially, and emotionally. Advisors need to be directing students to groups and organizations to support the student's cultural beliefs. As well, advisors need to be researching and seeking out resources to expand their own knowledge of the students’ diverse backgrounds to better advise their students. It is important to know students' backgrounds and respect the differences. My husband Bach Hang and our children (Lilly Hang and Alex Clarke) The Clarke-Hang Blended Family
    • 5 MULTICULTURAL ADVISING PORTFOLIO Personal Background Name Denise (Summerhouse) Clarke-Hang About Currently, I work with students at the St. Gianna Catholic Health Academy in Wichita, KS and am working to complete my PhD in Curriculum and Instruction at KSU. I have a diverse family and work with a diverse group of students. Firsthand I have seen some of the difficulties that come with working with not only students from diverse backgrounds, but with a husband/family that was raised in a different culture. My husband left for America from Location St. Louis Hang Family Picture Vietnam on a boat when he was 2years old in 1977 following the Program Director Vietnam War. He reached America St. Gianna Catholic Health Academy when he was 5 years old and learned Via Christi Health Systems English from watching television. His Father was Chinese escaping Email persecution in China living in Vietnam and his mother was Chinese clarke-hang@stgianna.org living in Vietnam prior to their arrival in the US. His father then died Professional Portfolio only 7 years after reaching America leaving his mother a single mother http://www.shdgroup.com/Denise_Clarke/index.html from a different culture with three young boys to raise. In St. Louis my Phone husband, Bach, suffered from much discrimination because he was 3166195180 Chinese living in a large population of Vietnamese and African Areas of Expertise American. It was a very rough Medical Science, Technology, Communication, and neighborhood, Bach calls it the St. Research Louis Hood aka "THE SOUTH SIDE.” Bach’s mother still has much difficultly with communication in English, but can speak about 5 other languages.
    • 6 MULTICULTURAL ADVISING PORTFOLIO Bach and I have a daughter that is a blend of the two of us as well as a son from my previous marriage living in shared parenting situation going between two very different homes every other day. Myself I was born and raised in Wichita, KS and am Caucasian (English, Irish, and German heritage that has lived in the US for many My mother-in-law Ahn Hang and my daughter Lilly (2 months old) generations). As a child I was fortunate to have traveled to multiple locations worldwide with my family. It has been said I came from an upper middle class family. In our household my father was Doctor and my mother stay at home but had a Masters in elementary education. Most would say I lived a sheltered suburban life style. At least that is what my husband tells me! My Dad, Mom, (Dr. and Mrs. Summerhouse) and Lilly on Chinese New Year 2010MMy 2010 My Lilly’s 1st Birthday with Alex her brother helping with the cake A
    • 7 MULTICULTURAL ADVISING PORTFOLIO Bach Hang (My Husband) Denise (Summerhouse) Clarke-Hang Privilege Awareness and Advising Sefl Awarness Denise Clarke-Hang Privilege Awareness White privilege has never really been in my consciousness. I was raised in a white upper-middle class family. My father was a family practice doctor. Although my mother had a master’s degree in education, she chose to stay home with four kids stayed home with us kids. Both of my parents came from white blue collar middle class backgrounds. It really was not until I met my husband, Bach and this course, that I really became consciously aware of white privilege. In my reading I found the article Let’s Talk About Racism Baby stated “Whites are perceived as the "norm" and, therefore, do not need to be labeled (e.g., "hyphenated"). Of course, accompanying this tacit belief is that those who aren't the "norm" are in some way "abnormal." As this disparity is brought into consciousness, White students realize that the "weirdness" they describe feeling is, in fact, discomfort with acknowledging the position of power that they have been ascribed in our society as a function of their skin color” (Heinze, Peter 2008). My husband, Bach Hang, was born in Vitanam. His father, Quang Hang, was born in Hunan, China and left there with his two older brothers when he was 7 years old to escape the invading Japanese. Quang grew up in Vietnam and married Anh Hong, Bach’s mother. Anh’s mother ran a family coffee shop slash diner and saved quite a bit of the profits from her business. Anh’s mother later distributed this money among Anh and her 5 siblings so they could escape Vietnam in the late 1970s following the Vietnam War. In 1978 Quang, Anh, and their three children set off on a boat from Vietnam to the United States. They had to stay in a refugee camp in Malaysia for about a year prior to reaching the United States on August 2, 1980. Bach was then 5 years old and his personality was formed. Bach’s older cousin, Peter Hong, who was about 16 years old at the time, left with Bach and his
    • 8 MULTICULTURAL ADVISING PORTFOLIO family. Bach’s parents hope they could pass Peter off as their son so that when he got to the United States, he could sponsor his parents and his 4 siblings over. Unfortunately, Peter was not allowed to travel on with Bach and his family to the United States. That’s because Peter was not considered an “immediate family member.” Peter had to stay in the refugee camp another year until his own family could leave Vietnam and catch up to him. Once they reached the United States, Bach learned English in a matter of months by watching Saturday morning cartoons and a two hour block of his favorite situation comedies after school. Bach started kindergarten right away. Meanwhile, I was making snow angels, running around my neighborhood playing, loving on my dolls, rolling down hills, making mud pies, and walking to the market to buy candy. I saw this way of life as the “norm.” I never had a thought in my mind that kids and their parents were struggling. As my husband puts it “my world was rainbows and butterflies.” Bach’s struggle did not stop when he entered Kindergarten. He had his leg shoved into a toilet filled with feces when he was in 1st grade by older white kids who teased him. They did that because Bach dared to fight back. Quang worked in a factory making wind chimes. Anh got a job as a housekeeper at Camelback Inn in Phoenix, Arizona where they settled. In 1987, Bach’s father died suddenly of a heart attack. This left Anh to fend for herself and her three young boys. They moved half way across the country to St. Louis, Missouri to be with Anh’s younger brothers, Vo and King Hong. Bach’s family lived in his Uncle Vo’s two bedroom house. However, Uncle Vo had a family of his own, a wife and for kids. Bach and his two brothers slept in the attic with their three cousins. They lived in an attic that only had a air conditioning unit in the window. His mother continued to work long hours as a housekepper, but now with Marriott, cleaning about 15 rooms a day. In my “world” Bach’s way of life did not exist. My world was filled with majority of white Christians who worked, spent time with family, and friends. As a young child I went to fancy meals at expensive restaurants and received presents on a regular basis. I thought this way of life was the norm. I always felt a sense of belonging. As ironic as it was, in my own backyard in 1980 my brother Will and I tried to dig a hole to China. We had this fantastic idea of what it would look like on the other side. We envisioned people looking slightly different but doing what we were doing: eating fancy meals, shopping, and playing with dolls. It never crossed our minds that there was a different way of life. We just thought that they would be standing upside down, since the earth is round of course. My only thought was how was I going to flip around once I crawled through the hole without falling through the sky. I tell you this story because it demonstrates the carefree and protected life I had as a privileged child. I have always known a person of a different color or race, but never thought to stop to think that their lives were remotely different than my own. My school was predominantly white country folks in the middle class. I have visited many different countries: Mexico, Bahamas, Greece, and Panama but never stopped to really realize that everyone could not have what they wanted if they worked hard and dreamed big. In fact I have even told Bach that I feel like I am visiting a different country when I go to visit his family in St. Louis. There is a different language spoken, the smells of food are
    • 9 MULTICULTURAL ADVISING PORTFOLIO different, and the environment does not place the same value on things as I have seen in my upbringing. Bach has taught me that there are different ways of living and providing me an awareness of other cultures. In my teaching this has helped me to be more conscious of cultural differences when advising students. In the readings we have had throughout this course, Bach and I have had good dialogue about our upbringings and cultural differences. I feel that these discussions will better assist me when I work with my students who undoubtedly will come from various backgrounds. Advising Sefl Awarness Most of my students I work with are white children of privilege. However, I usually have a few students that are black, latino, or asian who hail from the middle or lower socioeconomic class. My most difficult students I have had to understand and work with were from the black culture. However, since Bach went to a predominantly black school he has been very helpful in advising me on how to approach issues that have come up. For example, I had a black female student that was much larger than I was. She was always trying to prove how physically tougher she was and always talked about how she was from Grove Street. I have learned that Grove is not exactly one of the safest streets in Wichita. I discovered she needed a root canal. However, she told me that her mother wanted her to tough it out because the root canal was an expensive procedure. The student was in pain. She was easily agitated and disruptive to the class. She often just put her head down and moaned. I called her mom and explained the necessity of the procedure and how the pain was affecting her ability to focus in class. To my surprise, the student had a root canal the next day and I had gained her respect. The following semester, I received a thank you letter from the student. In the letter, the student wrote that she understood I was trying to help her. That letter is one of the highlights of my teaching career. I count it as one of the reasons why I entered this profession. It is theory that guides us as professionals to make good judgments as advisors. I think it is said best in the Critical Race Perspectives on Theory in Student “Without theory, professionals may informally attempt to make sense of observations and phenomena. However, this version of sense making tends to be less cohesive and less consistent than theory-based approaches to understanding students. Theories provide an overarching perspective about a certain trend or set of phenomena" (Patton, McEwen, Rendón & Howard-Hamilton, 2007) These anecdotes showed me that cultural issues can be difficult, but very interesting and rewarding. I am glad to be receiving direction this semester formally through this class. Specific Populations, Retention, and Academic Curricula
    • 10 MULTICULTURAL ADVISING PORTFOLIO Introduction During the course of study covering Multicultural Advising I have studied the question of what is advising, theories of student development, and some special populations in advising. Each of these three overall concepts were broken down into module lessons. This allowed me to focus on the specific areas of importance and interact with my peers about these concepts. What is Advising? Within my group, Persistence, I have reflected on multicultural concepts and core principles on the class’s discussion board. In the book, How Minority Students Experience College, multiculturalism is defined as the knowledge and awareness of diversity that translates into respectful interaction, communication and collaboration between the advisor and advisee. Multicultural advising addressing needs of an ever-increasing minority student population (Watson, Terrell, and Wright, 2002). Specific Populations (Institutional climate and Advising Services) In class, we discussed three diverse cultural dynamics online; a student with the Dyslexia, an International student from China, and a first generation Latina single parent whose daughter is a college freshman. I chose the International student from China because of my professional experiences in working with my Asian students and the personal experiences I have in being married to a Chinese man. However, I was especially interested in the thread discussion about the student with dyslexia. Before I took this class, I never thought about dyslexia along with multicultural advising. But, after further reflection, I understand how this would be a neutral place to assist the student without hitting their disability head on. From my experience students that are dyslexic will do their best to hide their difference in processing and not easily seek out help. I myself struggled with a processing/attention disorder in school. However, I was able to succeed in school. In college, I never went to visit my adviser. I was able to compensate for my disorder and keep it hidden. Besides, I did not want to be “labeled.” I responded to my fellow PhD candidate Joseph Kornoski’s comment that the advisor should be ready to be very patient (personal communication, January 20, 2010). A student might appear that they have processed information when indeed they have not. Advisors of dyslexic students should be ready to state and read things over and over. In module number two, we discussed theories of student development. Then, we engrossed ourselves in several other theories; racial and cultural identity development and critical race theory (CRT), white racial identity and privilege in academic advising, and sexual identity development. Retention
    • 11 MULTICULTURAL ADVISING PORTFOLIO Both social class and belonging are important when looking at the theories of student development. Social class can determine whether a student is accepted into a certain group. This is not a factor that is commonly acknowledged or even verbalized at the collegiate level. I feel this factor is especially important because colleges are dominated by White Privilege. College students’ crave a sense of belonging. A sense of belonging strengthens the students’ chance of success in other areas within a university. I found my own sense of belonging in college while playing tennis for Emporia State University. Tennis kept me out of trouble. It also helped me maintain my desire to succeed academically. Tyler Hayes from my group Persistence shared a similar experience of belonging to a basket ball team in college (personal communication, February 5, 2010). Research has shown that students thrive academically with a dynamic sense of belonging. “Another construct that is similar to and may in fact be predictive of a sense of belonging—has “tremendous potential . . . for enhancing most aspects of the undergraduate student’s cognitive and affective development” (Ostrove & Long, 2007). When discussing racial and cultural identity development, critical race theory (CRT), and white racial identity and privilege in academic advising I was brought to tears. The article "Racial and cultural identity development in people of color" was too close to home. In their article, Sue &Sue stated that a white person becomes conflicted over unresolved racial moral dilemmas that are perceived as polar opposites. An example of this is when a person claims not to be racist but is against interracial marriages. Another example is when a person believes that people are equal, but gains an awareness of the second-class status of ethnic minorities, (Sue & Sue, 2008). I am representative of this example. I worry about my daughter, Lillian’s acceptance as she grows up because she is both Chinese and White. I believe myself to be nonracist, yet I have these worries for Lillian and other minority students. I have grown up as a White girl in White suburbia and do not want my daughter or any other minority student to be treated at school as a second-class student just because of their mixed heritage or culture. It was nice to see the response by Heidi Ellis to my posting (personal communication, February 18, 2010). She appreciated my emotional connection with being from the White race and my reaction of being conflicted. In the article Let’s Talk About Racism Baby, the author stated that “whites are perceived as the "norm" and, therefore, do not need to be labeled (e.g., "hyphenated"). Of course, accompanying this tacit belief is that those who aren't the "norm" are in some way "abnormal." As this disparity is brought into consciousness, White students realize that the "weirdness" they describe feeling is, in fact, discomfort with acknowledging the position of power that they have been ascribed in our society as a function of their skin color” (Heinze, 2008).
    • 12 MULTICULTURAL ADVISING PORTFOLIO My Chinese/Caucasian Daughter Lilly 4 months old The literature I read hit home for me because it discussed being Euro-American. I myself am a mix of German, English, and Irish heritage. My husband is Chinese-American. He was born in Vietnam. His parents came from China and grew up there. They left for the United States when he was about three years old. It is interesting that people in America tend to pause when they hear someone refer to themselves as Euro-American, but not Chinese American. In other words, instead of referring to themselves as White, a person who’s heritage is rooted in France would refer to themselves as Euro-American. That is generally considered odd, but not a person who’s heritage comes from Japan stating they’re Japanese American.. What does “White” mean really anyway? Does it mean a sense of power, prestige, an exception from a label as established in the literature? My years of teaching students have revealed that this is the view of most minority, and immigrant students and families in the United States. I have learned I need to be cognitive of this fact when I work with and advise a student and his or her parents. My husband, Bach, told me most immigrants, especially Asian immigrants and especially those from his mother’s generation, mean White people when they say American. He said that black people are considered black and people who are of Latino or Mexican descent are considered Mexican. I have spoken to several minority students that shared the same feeling and view point. I was surprised at first when this view point was shared among minorities because I have always thought of the United States as the “melting pot” and ALL CITIZENS to be considered American. After all, I had family that immigrated at some point to the United States. I just don’t know when they arrived because it was so many years ago. I naively made the assumption that other cultures thought the same. However they do not. When advising students I need to listen first, keep a student’s cultural in mind, and refrain from making assumptions based on preconceived notions. When studying the sexual identity development, the Queer Theory caught my attention. This theory promotes further research and understanding of sexual orientation and how we categorize sexual orientation. The Queer Theory also is working towards normalizing views of students’ sexual orientation whether it is transgender, transsexual, gay, lesbian, or another sexual orientation. This theory promotes greater freedom from the rigid gender roles when advising students. As advisors we need to step out of our selves and provide clubs, communities, medical professionals, and other resources that will assist the students in supporting and understanding
    • 13 MULTICULTURAL ADVISING PORTFOLIO their sexual orientation. "Feminist, postmodern, and queer theoretical scholars present significant alternatives to medical and psychiatric perspectives on gender identity. A number of these scholars suggest that gender identity is not necessarily linked to biological sex assignment at birth, but is created through complex social interactions and influenced by the dynamics of institutionalized power inequalities" (Bilireau & Renn, 2005). Taking the Queer Theory into consideration we need to have resources on hand as advisors to support and inform students of communities and clubs that can help them to make resolutions as to their belonging. A Persistence group member, Molly Triplett, commented on the discussion board that she saw value in my views on how to assist students of different sexual orientation when advising (personal communication, February 27, 2010). While discussing Special Populations, I noted that the United States government has tried to help international students with some of the hurdles they have experienced. This has bee done through the “Development and implementation of programs that facilitate collaboration among international education service professionals” (Starobin, 2006). Even while demands for compliance of federal regulations continue to increase, international student service professionals should still be able to create welcoming support for students and scholars. As advisors we need to take ownership in ability to use and provide resources to streamline communication with International students such as by email, phone, Skype, WebPages, blogs, wikis, and other distance educational communication tools. The first generation Latino students I have taught required that they trust in their instructors before they could have any trust in their advisors. From the class readings I found the time the student spends with the instructor in class, the student is building a relationship for trust to flourish. The student has to seek the advisor to build a relationship and obtain advice. First generation Latino students are used to relaying on their community and peers for advice. Advisors are not automatically seen as part of that world. That’s why the trust in advisors has to be developed through teachers. Academic Curricula Curriculum needs to be built with the understanding that there will be a diverse group of students for instructors and advisors to work with. An advisor needs to be flexible and ready to use resources available to best fit the individual student’s cultural needs and demands. If the resources are not readily available then multicultural advisors need to reach out to the community and understand the impact of culture on the students in order to help them succeed academically. I am the program director and instructor for the St. Gianna Catholic Health Academy. My employer is the Catholic Diocese of Wichita. The program is composed of the partnership of Via Christi Regional Medical Center, Newman University, Kapaun Mount Carmel, Bishop Carroll High School, and ESSDACK. My program provides high school students a real world learning experience in medicine. My goal of the program is to assist students in gaining knowledge of the careers available in medicine, understand terminology used in medicine, help students integrate technology into their learning, and develop good communication skills. I have had students obtain jobs during and after the program. In fact, one of my students who is very fluent in Spanish (and even her mother) found work as an interpreter at three area
    • 14 MULTICULTURAL ADVISING PORTFOLIO hospitals here in Wichita. For instance, she provided interpretation for a Latino patient during a cesarean section. Please see the attached appendix to see my program’s curriculum. Conclusion Every group of students discussed the advisor needs to spend time to build a rapport, investigate the cultural needs, provide resources, and technology savvy for distance education and advising. It takes ownership and be self-directed to succeed in advising multicultural students. There are challenges I encounter as a multicultural advisor, but with an “I think I can” personality and the ability to lean on others daily I am able to understand students cultural needs in academia inside the my culture and outside my cultural belonging. ST. GIANNA CATHOLIC HEALTH ACADEMY CURRICULUM http://www.shdgroup.com/Denise_Clarke/theme_2.html Denise Clarke and Matt Brungardt developed the curriculum for the Catholic Health Academy in the fall of 2002. The curriculum is based on the Kansas State Department of Education’s curricular standards for science, communication, health care, and technology. The curriculum is also based on national health care standards. The curriculum was approved by Dr. Fred Saab in February and presented to the Diocesan Curriculum Council in March 2002. The link below will take you to the curriculum developed for the program. Multicultural Portfolio Course Conclusion During the course of study covering Multicultural Advising I have studied the question of what is advising, theories of student development, and some special populations in advising. Each of these three overall concepts were broken down into module lessens. This allowed me to focus on the specific areas of importance and interact with my peers about these concepts. What is Advising? Within my group, Persistence, I have reflected on multicultural concepts and core principles on the class’s discussion board. How Minority Students Experience College defines multiculturalism as the knowledge and awareness of diversity that translates into respectful interaction, communication and collaboration between the advisor and advisee. Multicultural advising addressing needs of an ever-increasing minority student population (Watson, Terrell, and Wright, 2002). Online as a class we discussed three diverse cultural dynamics; a student with the learning disability Dyslexia, an International student from China, and First generation Latina single parent whose daughter is a new college freshman. I choose at first to reflect at first on the International student from China due to what I have learned from my own experiences working with Asian students and living with my husband which happens to be Chinese.
    • 15 MULTICULTURAL ADVISING PORTFOLIO However, I was especially interested in the threads on discussing a student with the learning disability Dyslexia. Prior to this class, I would not have thought of dyslexia when it comes to multicultural advising, however after further reflection I can see how this would be a neutral place to assist the student without hitting their disability head on. From my experience students that are dyslexic will do their best to hide their difference in processing and not easily seek out help. Personally I happen to be a straight A student with an auditory processing/attention disorder. I know I would have never gone to visit with an advisor as an undergraduate, because I could always find a way to compensate and I did not want to be “labeled.” On the discussion board, I responded to Joseph Kornoski commenting that the advisor should be ready to be very patient (personal communication, January 20, 2010). A student might appear they have processed the information when they really have not. Advisors of dyslexic students should be ready to state and read the same thing more than once. In module number two we began with discussing theories of student development. Then we engrossed ourselves in several other theories; racial and cultural identity development and critical race theory (CRT), white racial identity and privilege in academic advising, and sexual identity development. Both social class and belonging are important when looking at the theories of student development. Social class can determine whether a student is accepted or not into a certain group. This is not a factor that is commonly acknowledged or even verbalized at the collegiate level. I feel this factor is especially true when taking into consideration that colleges are dominated by White Privilege. College students’ crave a sense of belonging. A sense of belonging strengthens the students’ chance of success in other areas within a university. Myself I found belonging on an athletic team playing tennis while at Emporia State University. This sense of belonging kept me wanting to succeed in my academics and stay the need to out of trouble so that I could continue to be part of my group. Tyler Hayes from my group Persistence shared a similar experience of belonging to a basket ball team in college (personal communication, February 5, 2010). Research has shown that students’ thrive academically with a dynamic sense of belonging. Another construct that is similar to and may in fact be predictive of a sense of belonging—has “tremendous potential . . . for enhancing most aspects of the undergraduate student’s cognitive and affective development” (Ostrove & Long, 2007). When discussing racial and cultural identity development, critical race theory (CRT), and white racial identity and privilege in academic advising I was brought to tears. The article "Racial and cultural identity development in people of color" was too close to home. Sue &Sue stated in their article that a white person becomes conflicted over unresolved racial moral dilemmas that are perceived as polar opposites: for example, believing that one is nonracist, yet being against interracial marriages for one’s own children, or believing that people are equal but gaining awareness of the second-class status of ethnic minorities, (Sue & Sue, 2008). The reason this statement hit so close to home is because I worry about my daughter’s acceptance as she grows up because she is both Chinese and White. I believe myself to be nonracist, yet I have these worries for my daughter Lillian and other minority students.
    • 16 MULTICULTURAL ADVISING PORTFOLIO I have grown up as a White girl in White suburbia and do not want my daughter or any other minority student to be treated at school as a second-class student just because she has mixed heritage or from a different culture. It was nice to see the response by Heidi Ellis to my posting (personal communication, February 18, 2010). She appreciated my emotional connection with being from the White race and my reaction of being conflicted. The article Let’s Talk About Racism Baby “Whites are perceived as the "norm" and, therefore, do not need to be labeled (e.g., "hyphenated"). Of course, accompanying this tacit belief is that those who aren't the "norm" are in some way "abnormal." As this disparity is brought into consciousness, White students realize that the "weirdness" they describe feeling is, in fact, discomfort with acknowledging the position of power that they have been ascribed in our society as a function of their skin color” (Heinze, 2008). When reading the literature, I happened to relate to the terminology of Euro-American, my heritage is mainly German, English, and Irish. My husband considers himself Chinese- American even though he was of Chinese heritage born in Vietnam and has lived in the United States since he was five years old. What is most remarkable to me is that most students do not think twice about a person calling themselves Chinese-American but do pause when they hear someone say they are Euro- American instead of White. What is “White” really anyway, power, prestige, an exception from a label as established in the literature? This is the view of many majority, minority, and immigrant students and families in the United States. I have realized I need to be cognitive of this fact when I work with and advise a student. My husband, Bach, has stated “his family was born in Vietnam and considers “American" to mean "White Person." Even though Bach’s family is now American citizens, they do not refer to themselves as “American."” I have spoken to several minority students that shared the same feeling and view point. I was surprised at first when this view point was shared among minorities because I have always thought of the United States as the “melting pot” and ALL CITIZENS to be considered American. After all, I had family that immigrated at some point to the United States, I just don’t know when they arrived because it was so many years ago. I naively made the assumption that other cultures thought the same. However they do not. When advising students I need to listen first, keep a student’s cultural in mind, and refrain from making assumptions based on preconceived notions. When studying the sexual identity development the Queer Theory caught my attention. This theory promotes further research and understanding of sexual orientation and how we categorize sexual orientation. The Queer Theory also is working towards normalizing views of students’ sexual orientation whether it is transgender, transsexual, gay, lesbian, or another sexual orientation. This theory promotes greater freedom from the rigid gender roles when advising students. As advisors we need to step out of our selves and provide clubs, communities, medical professionals, and other resources that will assist the students in supporting or finding their sexual orientation. "Feminist, postmodern, and queer theoretical scholars present significant alternatives to medical and psychiatric perspectives on gender identity. A number of these scholars suggest that gender identity is not necessarily linked to biological sex assignment at
    • 17 MULTICULTURAL ADVISING PORTFOLIO birth, but is created through complex social interactions and influenced by the dynamics of institutionalized power inequalities" (Bilireau & Renn, 2005). Taking the Queer Theory into consideration we need to have resources on hand as advisors to support and inform students of communities and clubs that can help them to make resolutions as to their belonging. A Persistence group member, Molly Triplett, commented on the discussion board that she saw value in my views on how to assist students of different sexual orientation when advising (personal communication, February 27, 2010). In discussing Special Populations I noted that to assist with rectifying some of these hurdles in but in place for International students, the United States has begun the “Development and implementation of programs that facilitate collaboration among international education service professionals and faculty are also encouraged for International EducationWeek (IEW) activities” (Starobin, 2006). Even while demands for compliance of federal regulations continue to increase, international student service professionals should still be able to create welcoming support for students and scholars. As advisors we need to take ownership in ability to use and provide resources to streamline communication with International students such as by email, phone, Skype, WebPages, blogs, wikis, and other distance educational communication tools. When working with first generation Latino students I have discovered that trust in instructors by Latino students is established before trust in advisors. From the class readings I found the time the student spends with the instructor in class, the student is building a relationship for trust to flourish. The student has to seek the advisor to build a relationship and obtain advice. First generation Latino students are used to relaying on their community and peers for advice. Advisors are not automatically seen as part of their world and community due to not being integrated into their daily community. In conclusion every diverse group of students discussed during our course the advisor needs to spend time to build a rapport, investigate the cultural needs, provide resources, and technology savvy for distance education and advising. It takes ownership and be self-directed to succeed in advising multicultural students. There are challenges I encounter as a multicultural advisor, but with an “I think I can” personality and the ability to lean on others daily I am able to understand students cultural needs in academia inside the my culture and outside my cultural belonging. References Bilireau, B. & Renn, K. (2005). Analysis of GLBT developmental models and implications for practice. In Gender Identity and sexual orientation. New Directions for Student Services. no. 111. Fall. 25-39. Critical Race Perspectives on Theory in Student Affairs. Patton, Lori D. McEwen, Marylu, Rendón, Laura, & Howard-Hamilton, Mary F. [PDF] Discusses critical race theory as it
    • 18 MULTICULTURAL ADVISING PORTFOLIO applies to student services. Compares CRT to other identity theories. Ellis, H. (2010, February 18). Week 5 Racial and Cultural Idenity Development and Critical Race Theory (CRT) [Msg 51]. Message posted to https://online.ksu.edu/MessageBoard/ReadThread.exec?EXEC_CLASS=messageboard. commands.ThreadCommands&EXEC_COMMAND=ReadThread&EXEC_ARGS= 3135084{||}196956{||}0{||}Current&courseName=EDCEP_851_DCARROLL&EXEC _NEXT_PAGE=/Threads.jsp# Hayes, T. (2010, Febuary 5). Module 2: Week 1[msg 40]. Message posted to https://online.ksu.edu/MessageBoard/ReadThread.exec?EXEC_CLASS=messageboard. commands.ThreadCommands&EXEC_COMMAND=ReadThread&EXEC_ARGS=3103 61{||}196956{||}0{||}Current&courseName=EDCEP_851_DCARROLL&EXEC_NEX _PAGE=/Threads.jsp# Heinze, Peter (2008). Let’s Talk about Race, Baby: How a White Professor Teaches White Students about White Privilege & Racism. Multicultural Education. 16 no1 Fall 2008, pgs. 2-11. [PDF]. Defines privilege in college settings and offers suggestions for managing it in a classroom setting. Kornoski, J. (2010, January 20). Module 1 Understanding Multicultural Advising and Core Principles [Msg 63]. Message posted to https://online.ksu.edu/MessageBoard/ReadThread.exec?EXEC_CLASS=messageboard. commands.ThreadCommands&EXEC_COMMAND=ReadThread&EXEC_ARGS=310 209{||}196953{||}0{||}Current&courseName=EDCEP_851_DCARROLL&EXEC_NE T_PAGE=/Threads.jsp# Ostrove, J. & Long, S. (2007). Social Class and Belonging. Implications for college adjustment. The Review of Higher Education. 30,4, 363-369. Racial and cultural identity development in people of color. Therapeutic Implications. In Sue D.W. & Sue, D. (2008). Counseling the Culturally Diverse. 5th Edition. New York: Wiley, 233-258. Starobin, S. (2006. Summer). International students in transition. Changes to access to U.S. Higher Education. New Directions for Student Services, no. 114. (Summer). Pgs. 63-71. Triplett, M. (2010, Febuary 27). Week 7 February 21-27 Sexual Idenity Development [Msg 45]. Message posted to https://online.ksu.edu/MessageBoard/ReadThread.exec? EXEC_CLASS=messageboard.commands.ThreadCommands&EXEC_COMMAND=Re adThread&EXEC_ARGS=3151871{||}196956{||}0{||}Current&courseName=EDCEP_8 51_DCARROLL&EXEC_NEXT_PAGE=/Threads.jsp#
    • 19 MULTICULTURAL ADVISING PORTFOLIO Watson, L.W., Terrell, M.T., Wright, D.J., and Associates. (Eds). (2002). How Minority Students Experience College. Implications for Planning and Policy. Sterling, VA: Stylus. Multicultural Advising Portfolio Self-Assessment Checklist Directions: This matrix is designed as a practical tool for students as they identify and evaluate their multicultural advising skills to include in their multicultural advising portfolio. Students are invited to rate themselves on each dimension. In each box, a student can list examples of multicultural advising performance in that area. If you have strong evidence in self-
    • 20 MULTICULTURAL ADVISING PORTFOLIO awareness for example, in the first box you would list activities that demonstrate your strong evidence rating. What you list is entirely up to you. It could be attending community events, doing reading, attending lectures, or volunteer activities. This rating scale is designed as a student-learning tool to guide a student’s multicultural advising skill development. Name: _________Denise Clarke-Hang____ Date 4/17/1010__________________________________ Self -Rating of Multicultural advising Performance Content Areas Strong evidence Some Evidence minimal evidence Very little No evidence 5 4 3 2 1 Shows Multiculturaladvising Self-Awareness Aware of my identity (Awareness) Understand privilege Learning about racial identity of students and Awarness of my family mixed background Chinese and White heritage Defined thought within my portfolio Defines multicultural advising operationally. (Awareness) Applies multicultural advising to academic settings Continued learning and research for education & curriculum. integrating into curriculum for each individual and cultural Applies multicultural principles toadvising Share educational opportunities, grant supported service delivery programs, and scholarships and shared by collaborating partners of theprogram Understands how privilege shapes multicultural Awareness that being of a the privileged cultural I have advising to work harder to understand and reach students. Sharing as I advise my students my life mixed Family situation Chinese and White helps to Open up and build bonds with students
    • 21 MULTICULTURAL ADVISING PORTFOLIO Shows how multiculturaladvising influences From grant programs offered by Newman student retention University it has shown that multicultural Advising influences student retention Recognizes how institutional climate influences Aware of how the cultural differences within multicultural advising. The hospital, college, high schools, and Student backgrounds influences multicultural Advising and ability to reach each individual Student. Copyright 2006 Doris Wright Carroll, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Kansas State University. Manhattan, KS. Revised 10/29//08