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Science Shop Introduction (CUexpo 2008)

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An introduction to Science Shops - units that offer independent participatory research support to the needs expressed by civil society

An introduction to Science Shops - units that offer independent participatory research support to the needs expressed by civil society

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  • 1. Science Shops as Science – Society interfaces CUexpo, Victoria 4 May 2008 An introduction Norbert Steinhaus and Caspar de Bok
  • 2. About Science Shops What ? Why ? Where ? How ? When ? Are you familiar with these questions ?
  • 3. A Science Shop provides independent, participatory research support in response to concerns experienced by civil society
  • 4. Science Shops seek to
    • provide civil society with knowledge and skills through research and education
    • provide their services on an affordable basis
    • promote and support public access to and influence on science and technology
    • create equitable and supportive partnerships with civil society organisations
    • enhance understanding among policy makers and education and research institutions of the research and education needs of civil society
    • enhance the transferrable skills and knowledge students, community representatives and researchers
  • 5. Universal Declaration of Human Rights, Art 27(1) (United Nations, 1948) ‘ Everyone has the right freely to participate in the cultural life of the community, to enjoy the arts and to share in scientific advancement and its benefits ’
  • 6. From the 70’s to 2007 70’s Netherlands, USA 80’s Australia, Denmark, England, Northern Ireland, Germany , Austria , France , Belgium 90’s Canada , Spain, Romania, Norway, Israel, New Zealand , Malaysia, Czech Rep, South Korea, South Africa 00’s Belgium, France, South Korea 2005 Portugal, Greece, Estonia, Latvia, Iceland, Japan, Wales, Scotland, Ireland, Turkey, Finland 2006 Hungary, China, Italy, Israel, Czech Republic 2007 South Africa Science Shop - Wetenschapswinkel - Boutique de Science - Videnskabsbutiken - Wissenschaftsladen - Bazar de las Ciencias - InterMediu
  • 7. University - Society i nterfaces Transfer bureau ( Science Shop )
    • SMEs
    • NGOs
    • Local authorities
    Research departments  c ontracts
    • Industry
    • National authorities
    Science Shop  student projects
    • Civil society
    • Small NGOs
    L ectures, events, press releases
    • General public
    Facility/ Interface Target group
  • 8. Actors and factors SOCIO-POLITICAL SCIENTIFIC CULTURAL POLICY-MAKERS FUNDERS HOSTS SUPPLY DEMAND STAFF
  • 9. Science shop models Where : D, AT, E, USA, CA, KR, I Where : NL, DK, D, UK, B, RO, CA, USA, AU, N, E, GR, F
    • Funding :
    • CBR projects
    • other activities
    • (local) government
    • Funding :
    • fully university
    • university/charity/projects
    • Position :
    • central/faculty/research dept.
    Non-university based University based
  • 10. Criteria for projects
    • Scientific element
    • Broad public interest
    • Use of results
    • Public results
    • No commercial means
    • No (full) financial means
  • 11. Clients of Science Shops
    • Local community groups
    • NGOs (e.g. environment, health, animal welfare, consumers)
    • Local/regional authorities
    • Trade unions
    • Museums
    • SMEs
    • Schools/pupils
    • Individuals (conditional)
  • 12. Mediation process
    • Receive/solicit clients and new questions
    • Map the real problem (articulation)
    • Preliminary research: refuse, refer, advice or formulate (scientific) research question (incl. funds if required)
    • Find (co-)supervisor
    • Find student / researcher
    • Maintain communication and process
    • Facilitate usable presentation / publication of results
    • Support implementation results and follow-up actions
    • Make inventory of follow-up research/themes
    • Evaluation
  • 13. Science Shop Basics
    • Demand driven
    • Listening and asking: articulation
    • Equal p artnership s
    • Quality and understanding
    • Feedback to science system
    Interactive Science Communication
  • 14. Science Shop impact s
    • Society
    • community access to research
    • community awareness of science
    • community involvement in policy (empowerment)
    • good governance (social capital)
    • Education
    • academic curriculum; problem-based learning
    • students awareness science - society
    • Research
    • research themes
    • researchers awareness society needs
  • 15. Some examples of projects
    • Cosmetics and environment
    • Traffic related air pollution and respiratory health
    • Side-effects of pesticides
    • Health related risk communication
    • Textiles, chemicals and allegies
    • Electrosmog
    • Ecological constructing
    • Environmental impact assessment products
    • Animal welfare and animal testing
  • 16. University mission
    • Service to society
    • “… and they transfer knowledge on behalf of society ” (Dutch Law on Higher Education and Research, a rt 1.3.1, 1992)
    • Education
    • Research
    University based Science Shops combine all three university missions
  • 17. A changing (Dutch) context
    • A revised focus on knowledge transfer
    • New funding structures
    • Integration with SME front office
    • Stronger faculty links
    • Less staff, bigger pool of faculty experts
    • Embedding in curricula