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Buddhism PP
Buddhism PP
Buddhism PP
Buddhism PP
Buddhism PP
Buddhism PP
Buddhism PP
Buddhism PP
Buddhism PP
Buddhism PP
Buddhism PP
Buddhism PP
Buddhism PP
Buddhism PP
Buddhism PP
Buddhism PP
Buddhism PP
Buddhism PP
Buddhism PP
Buddhism PP
Buddhism PP
Buddhism PP
Buddhism PP
Buddhism PP
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Buddhism PP

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  • There are about 365 million Buddhist in the world, which is about 6% of the population. Buddhism was founded in India 2,500 years ago by Siddhartha Guatama. Buddhism remains the dominant religion of the Far East and is increasingly popular in the West. There are people practicing Buddhism all over the world though some people may not know it. The continent with the most Buddhism practitioners is Asia. The country with the highest proportion of Buddhists is Laos, second being Japan.
  • Siddhartha Guatama was often called The supreme Buddha or Guatama Buddha. He was a great spiritual teacher and exemplar for Buddhists. The Buddha is not a god but a person who is aloud to go beyond the endless cycle of death, birth, and rebirth. There are many types of Buddha's. Most people are familiar with the fat Buddha.
  • The Tripitaka also known as the Pali canon is the main text of Buddhism. The Tripitaka was originally orally past down and was finally written in the third century B.C.E., shortly after the Buddha’s death. The text is called the Tripitaka because it was originally written on leafs and stored in baskets. There are three parts to the Tripitaka hence tri.
    There is the Vinaya Pitaka, meaning Discipline Basket, Sutra Pitaka, Discourse Basket and the Abhidharma Pitaka, Higher knowledge or Special Teachings Basket.
    The Vinaya was recalled by Upali who was a monk. It contains rules and guidelines, including 227 rules for monks, and nuns.
    The Sutra is about the Buddha’s teachings on behavior and doctrine, mentioning a lot about meditation techniques. It was recited by Buddha’s cousin and closest companion, Ananda.
    The Abhidharma is a collection of miscellaneous writings. It includes songs, stories and poetry of Buddha and his past lives.
  • Mahayana is usually translated as 'great vehicle', in opposition to Hinayana 'small vehicle'. This translation is obviously derogatory and offensive to the only early Buddhist school still in existence. Mahayana can actually also be translated as 'great path', that is: a path for every being. Hinayana would then mean: small path, or path.
  • The following aspects are associated with Mahayana:
    Universalism, Everyone will become a Buddha.
    Enlightened wisdom (prajna paramita), as the main focus of realization.
    Compassion to help sentient beings reach enlightenment: become a bodhisattva yourself
    Salvation- as opposed to Liberation- supported by a rich cosmography, including celestial realms and powers, with a spectrum ofBodhisattvas, both human and seemingly godlike, who can assist followers.
    In addition to meditation, the Mahayana schools of Buddhism have developed a variety of other ritual and devotional practices, many of which were inspired or influenced by the existing religious cultures of India, China, Japan, Southeast Asia, and Tibet. The articles in this section provide an overview of some of the main Buddhist sacred rituals and practices.
  • * Meditation - Mental concentration and mindfulness
    * Mantras - Sacred sounds
    * Mudras - Symbolic hand gestures
    * Prayer Wheels - Reciting mantras with the turn of a wheel
    Buddhism incorporates a variety of rituals and practices, which are intended to aid in the journey to enlightenment and bring blessings on oneself and others. The practice of meditation is central to nearly all forms of Buddhism, and it derives directly from the Buddha’s experiences and teachings. Meditation is is the central focus of Zen Buddhism and the only way to liberation in Theravada Buddhism.
  • * This is called a Sauvastika Sign. This ancient sign is infused with a variety of symbolic meanings, particularly lightning, the sun, the power to overcome evil, and universality. The arms of the Buddhist sauvastika point in the counter clockwise direction and the sign is always in an upright “+” position. The Buddhist sauvastika is NOT related to the Nazi swastika, which can be recognized by its arms pointing clockwise and the sign being tilted in an “x” position. The Buddhist sauvastika does not carry any implication of hatred and destruction.
  • “Bodhi” means “enlightenment ” “sattva” means “sentient being.”: Bodhisattva is someone who commits to alleviating the stress of others. They create enlightenment and joy for others.
  • The Dharma is the guide to enlightenment and essential truth. It also is used a lot as " the teachings of Buddha." The word in particular refers to karma and rebirth.
  • * Buddhist do not believe in a God or a man that created earth, but believe in 4 seasons. Such as Spring, Summer, Autumn and Winter, or, Birth, Old age, Illness, and then death.
    * Buddhist believe in heaven and hell, but thats not to be confused with Nirvana. Because in there heaven greed, anger and other bad feelings still exist. Such as the three poisons: Greed, ignorance and anger. While Nirvana doesn't have the three poisons.
    .
  • There are different beliefs holidays and practices for each sect in buddhism. Sometimes they use ritual objects, things like incense burners, prayer beads, stupas and pagodas which are shrines containing sacred relics(an object surviving from an earlier time) of all different size and shapes.
  • The begging bowl is a simple but very important and symbolic item that Buddhist monks use daily. The bowl isn’t used for anything special other than to collect food and money from supporters. The begging bowl is symbolic because in a some legends it is said that when Buddha was under the Bodhi Tree to find enlightenment a young women gave him rice in a golden bowl. He rationed the rice for the next 49 days until he would be enlightened.
  • As our guest speaker told us, the prayer beads symbolize a human. You can see the head the arms and the legs.The 108 beads represent human desires.
  • The eight auspicious symbols signify many important aspects of the teachings of Buddhism. They are often on many Buddhist textiles, objects and paintings. All the symbols are considered lucky especially when together.
  • Parasol - protection, royalty and spiritual power
    Golden Fishes - good fortune, fertility and salvation
    Treasure Vase - spiritual and material abundance
    Lotus - mental and spiritual purity and compassion
  • Conch Shell - the fame of Buddha's teachings
    Endless Knot - infinite wisdom and compassion of the Buddha
    Victory Banner - victory of the Buddha's enlightenment, teachings and wisdom over ignorance
    Wheel - the teachings of the Buddha and representing the universal law in Buddhism
  • With the fast pace and high stress of modern life many people are becoming interested in the peaceful philosophy of Buddhism. In particular there is a very deep interest in learning how to meditate, both to overcome stress and anxiety, and to deepen ones spiritual experience.
    Many gays and lesbians are attracted to the Buddhist religion because it lacks in homophobia.
  • Before buddhism women were treated poorly with little to no freedom. Although at first buddha was unsure if women could handle the same responsibilities they thrived and showed buddha their reliability and dependability.  Buddha welcomed women to practice buddhism teaching that women and men are equal and truly can handle the same responsibilities. Women embraced their new role now aloud to learn and were even expected to know the trade of their husbands in case of their absence. Women could now use their new found religious freedom and practice buddhism.
  • At the moment buddhism actually has a fairly big political significance. Tibet and China, both countries with high populations of buddhists  are arguing over Tibet being part of China or being it's own country. One of Buddhism's most popular political figure, the Dali Lama is who China is holding responsible for Tibet's fight for freedom. 
  • Transcript

    • 1. Buddhism By: Kyra, Ilana & Kiki QuickTime™ and a decompressor are needed to see this picture. By Kyra, Kiki and Ilana
    • 2. QuickTime™ and a decompressorare needed to see this picture. Buddha QuickTime™ and a decompressor are needed to see this pic QuickTime™ and a decompressor are needed to see this picture.
    • 3. Tipitaka QuickTime™ and a decompressor are needed to see this picture.
    • 4. Mahayana and Hinayana QuickTime™ and a decompressor are needed to see this pictu QuickTime™ and adecompressorare needed to see this picture. QuickTime™ and a decompressor are needed to see this picture.
    • 5. Mahayana and Hinayana QuickTime™ and adecompressorare needed to see this picture. QuickTime™ and a decompressor are needed to see this picture. QuickTime™ and a decompressor are needed to see this picture. QuickTime™ and adecompressorare needed to see this p
    • 6. Practices QuickTime™ and a decompressor are needed to see this picture.
    • 7. Sauvastika
    • 8. QuickTime™ and a decompressor are needed to see this picture. Bodhisattva
    • 9. Dharma QuickTime™ and a decompressor are needed to see this picture.
    • 10. Nirvana QuickTime™ and adecompressorare needed to see this picture. QuickTime™ and a decompressor are needed to see this picture. QuickTime™ anddecompressorare needed to see this
    • 11. Expressions QuickTime™ and aTIFF (Uncompressed) decompressorare needed to see this picture. QuickTime™ and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompres are needed to see this picture. QuickTime™ and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture. QuickTime™ and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture.
    • 12. Begging Bowl QuickTime™ and a decompressorare needed to see this picture. QuickTime™ and a decompressor are needed to see this picture. QuickTime™ and a decompressor are needed to see this picture. QuickTime™ and adecompressor are needed to see this picture.
    • 13. Prayer Beads QuickTime™ and a decompressor are needed to see this picture.
    • 14. The Eight Auspicious Symbols QuickTime™ and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture.
    • 15. The Eight Auspicious Symbols QuickTime™ and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture. QuickTime™ and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture. QuickTime™ and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture. QuickTime™ and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture.
    • 16. The Eight Auspicious Symbols QuickTime™ and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture. QuickTime™ and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture. QuickTime™ and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture. QuickTime™ and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture.
    • 17. Why is Buddhism important today?
    • 18. QuickTime™ and a decompressor are needed to see this picture. Women’s Role in Buddhism
    • 19. QuickTime™ and a decompressor are needed to see this picture. Buddhism’s political significance
    • 20. Bibliography  "Buddhist Studies: Buddhism & Women: Position of Women." BuddhaNet - Worldwide Buddhist Information and Education Network. Web. 16 Nov. 2009. <http://www.buddhanet.net/e-learning/history/position.htm>.  "Buddhist Studies: Buddhism & Women: Position of Women." BuddhaNet - Worldwide Buddhist Information and Education Network. Web. 16 Nov. 2009. <http://www.buddhanet.net/e-learning/history/position.htm>.  "Burning joss sticks 'as deadly as traffic fumes or cigarette smoke' | World news | guardian.co.uk." Latest news, comment and reviews from the Guardian | guardian.co.uk. Web. 15 Nov. 2009. < http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2008/jul/30/health>.  "Eight Auspicious Symbols - Useful simple local language for easy communication in rural areas - Bhutan Majestic Travel." Home - Bhutan Majestic Travel, Bhutan Travel, Bhutan Travel Agents, Bhutan Tour Operators, Trip to Bhutan, Kingdom of Bhutan, Inbound Travel Agency, Bhutan Tourism, Majestic Travel - Bhutan Majestic Travel - Bhutan Majestic Travel. Web. 15 Nov. 2009. < http://www.bhutanmajestictravel.com/buddhism/eight-auspicious-symbols>
    • 21. Bibliography  "File:Buddhist distribution.png -." Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Web. 16 Nov. 2009. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Buddhist_distribution.png>. "Gautama Buddha -." Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Web. 19 Oct. 2009. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gautama_Buddha>. "History of Buddhism |." About Buddhism. Web. 26 Oct. 2009. <http://www.aboutbuddhism.org/history-of-buddhism.htm/>. "Individual Eight Auspicious Signs." Osel Shen Phen Ling - Tibetan Buddhist Center - Missoula, Montana USA. Web. 15 Nov. 2009. <http://www.fpmt-osel.org/gallery/signs.htm>. "Individual Eight Auspicious Signs." Osel Shen Phen Ling - Tibetan Buddhist Center - Missoula, Montana USA. Web. 16 Nov. 2009. <http://www.fpmt-osel .org/gallery/signs.htm>.  "List of religious populations -." Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Web. 16 Nov. 2009. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_religious_populations#Buddhists>.
    • 22. Bibliography  "Buddhism and homosexuality." ReligiousTolerance.org by the Ontario Consultants on Religious Tolerance. Web. 11 Nov. 2009. <http://www.religioustolerance.org/hom_budd.htm>.  "Buddhism Today |." About Buddhism. Web. 2 Nov. 2009. <http://www.aboutbuddhism.org/buddhism-today.php/>. "Buddhism." World Religion. Web. 26 Oct. 2009. <http://www.world- religion.org/buddhism.php>.  "Buddhist beliefs." IBPS Sweden - Startsida. Web. 26 Oct. 2009. <http://www.ibps-sweden.com/eng/buddhism/belifes.htm>. "Buddhist Festivals and Special Days." BuddhaNet - Worldwide Buddhist Information and Education Network. Web. 16 Nov. 2009. <http://www.buddhanet.net/festival.htm>.  "Buddhist Rituals and Practices - ReligionFacts." Religion, World Religions, Comparative Religion - Just the facts on the world's religions. Web. 16 Nov. 2009. <http://www.religionfacts.com/buddhism/practices.htm>.
    • 23. Bibliography  BuddhaNet - Worldwide Buddhist Information and Education Network. Web. 16 Nov. 2009. <http://www.buddhanet.net/e- learning/history/bud_statwrld.htm>.  BuddhaNet - Worldwide Buddhist Information and Education Network. Web. 16 Nov. 2009. <http://www.buddhanet.net/e- learning/history/bud_statwrld.htm>.  "Buddhism - ReligionFacts." Religion, World Religions, Comparative Religion - Just the facts on the world's religions. Web. 26 Oct. 2009. <http://www.religionfacts.com/buddhism/index.htm>.  "Buddhism -." Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Web. 19 Oct. 2009. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buddhism>.  "Buddhism -." Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Web. 19 Oct. 2009. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buddhism#Rebirth>.

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