c
www.slideshare.net/janeatcc
janepark@creativecommons.org
Who we are
How we happened
What we do
by aussiegall
Weʼre a 501c3 corporation headquartered in
San Francisco with ~30 employees around the
world.
Creative Commons International
Creative Commons International




            (Weʼre international.)
Weʼre a 501c3 corporation headquartered in
San Francisco with 30 employees around the
world.

     • Weʼre a nonprofit.
Weʼre a 501c3 corporation headquartered in
San Francisco with 30 employees around the
world.

     • Weʼre a nonprofit.
   ...
Weʼre a 501c3 corporation headquartered in
San Francisco with 30 employees around the
world.

      • Weʼre a nonprofit.
  ...
Weʼre a 501c3 corporation headquartered in
San Francisco with 30 employees around the
world.

      • Weʼre a nonprofit.
  ...
C
Before 1976
   • Default was free
   • U.S. Register of Copyrights
   • Any work fixed in a tangible
   medium
C
Copyright
  • Law designed to govern creative
  and expressive works
  • Encourage creation and promote
  dissemination
C
Before the Internet
      • Creation and dissemination were
      via the printing press or film reels

      • When it w...
C
1976 Copyright Act
      • Automatic Copyright
      • Life plus 50 years
cba      by hyku
http://www.flickr.com/photos/hyku/2166224145/
C
1998 CTEA Act
(“Sonny Bono” or “Mickey Mouse” Act)
           • Life plus 70 years
           • 120 years for corporate ...
cba      by ivva
http://www.flickr.com/photos/ivva/336209777/
cba      by ivva
http://www.flickr.com/photos/ivva/336209777/
It is illegal to




        copy, distribute, build upon, or remix

                     copyrighted works.
Break the law
         or
Donʼt use the Internet
C Fair use, or Copyrights Exceptions &
  Limitations (CEL)
      • No blanket protection for one kind of
      use (ie. ed...
A lot of creators want to share,
especially
globally.




                                                                ...
A lot of creators want to share,
especially
globally.




                                                                ...
cb   by Joi
C
2003 - Eldred v. Ashcroft
     • Challenged Constitutionality of the
     1998 Copyright Extension Act
     • constantly...
“To promote the Progress of Science
and useful Arts, by securing for limited
  Times to Authors and Inventors the
   exclu...
7-2
cb   by Joi Ito
c
c
offers an alternative.
For the
   Global
Networked
      Age

             http://flickr.com/photos/wwworks/440672445/
                           ...
A simple, standardized way to grant
   copyright permissions to your
           creative work.
Step 1: Choose Conditions


Attribution       Share Alike



Non-Commercial    No Derivative Works
Step 2: Receive a License
CC Licenses are built on top of
        copyright law
✓ CC works within the existing system by
 allowing movement from “All Rights
 Reserved” to “Some Rights Reserved”
✓ CC works within the existing system by
 allowing movement from “All Rights
 Reserved” to “Some Rights Reserved”
✓ CC works within the existing system by
 allowing movement from “All Rights
 Reserved” to “Some Rights Reserved”
✓ CC imp...
✓ CC works within the existing system by
 allowing movement from “All Rights
 Reserved” to “Some Rights Reserved”
✓ CC imp...
How do I get one?
CC licenses are expressed in three
different ways:
human-readable   lawyer-readable legal      machine-readable
 commons d...
52 Jurisdictions Ported
52 Jurisdictions Ported
Licensed Objects via Google & Yahoo!
Over 350 million items
Over 133 million photos on
Flickr alone
Who is using CC?
Film
Music
Design
Dance
Museum
“CC allows us to change as we grow and
thatʼs very valuable – it means we can
take small steps toward larger goals and
do ...
wiki.creativecommons.org/Case_Studies
The Sharing Landscape in Culture before CC

          Permission Culture
          Copyright Exceptions and
         Limit...
The Sharing Landscape in Culture after CC

           Permission Culture
           Pre-cleared permissions via CC
       ...
Attribute to             c with a link to
                      creativecommons.org

Creative Commons, ccLearn, the double...
CC at Social Media Art Camp (SMartCAMP)
CC at Social Media Art Camp (SMartCAMP)
CC at Social Media Art Camp (SMartCAMP)
CC at Social Media Art Camp (SMartCAMP)
CC at Social Media Art Camp (SMartCAMP)
CC at Social Media Art Camp (SMartCAMP)
CC at Social Media Art Camp (SMartCAMP)
CC at Social Media Art Camp (SMartCAMP)
CC at Social Media Art Camp (SMartCAMP)
CC at Social Media Art Camp (SMartCAMP)
CC at Social Media Art Camp (SMartCAMP)
CC at Social Media Art Camp (SMartCAMP)
CC at Social Media Art Camp (SMartCAMP)
CC at Social Media Art Camp (SMartCAMP)
CC at Social Media Art Camp (SMartCAMP)
CC at Social Media Art Camp (SMartCAMP)
CC at Social Media Art Camp (SMartCAMP)
CC at Social Media Art Camp (SMartCAMP)
CC at Social Media Art Camp (SMartCAMP)
CC at Social Media Art Camp (SMartCAMP)
CC at Social Media Art Camp (SMartCAMP)
CC at Social Media Art Camp (SMartCAMP)
CC at Social Media Art Camp (SMartCAMP)
CC at Social Media Art Camp (SMartCAMP)
CC at Social Media Art Camp (SMartCAMP)
CC at Social Media Art Camp (SMartCAMP)
CC at Social Media Art Camp (SMartCAMP)
CC at Social Media Art Camp (SMartCAMP)
CC at Social Media Art Camp (SMartCAMP)
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CC at Social Media Art Camp (SMartCAMP)

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I gave a talk yesterday on Creative Commons at Social Media Art Camp (SMartCAMP) which also ustreamed live at http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/5261313. It is ideal for those who are artist creators and/or part of arts organizations/projects/institutions.

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  • replace with kaytaneys graph
  • replace with kaytaneys graph
  • So – looking at how the CC licences are being used
    According to the latest statistics from the CC website, there are currently about 140million webpages that use a CC licence
    As you can see, almost all of them contain the BY element – that’s because it was made compulsory for all the licences except the public domain licences after the first year, because pretty much everybody was using it anyway
    The majority also, unsurprisingly, choose the non-commercial element
    Interestingly, next most popular is ShareAlike, not noderivatives – this shows that there is still a strong focus on fostering creativity among CC community, and that, rather than trying to lock their material up, people are happy for it to be remixed, as long as the new work is also sharedEven more interesting is how these statistics are changing over time
    Even more interestingly – if you look at how the licences is being used over time, people are gradually moving towards more liberal licences with less restrictions on them
    This movement seems to indicate that as people become more familiar with the licences, they are more comfortable allowing greater use
    This is supported by anecdotal evidence from CC users who, after initially publishing their material under restrictive licences that don’t allow derivatives, often ‘re-release’ their material to allow new works


















































  • Of course this slide deck is CC licensed.
  • CC at Social Media Art Camp (SMartCAMP)

    1. 1. c www.slideshare.net/janeatcc janepark@creativecommons.org
    2. 2. Who we are How we happened What we do
    3. 3. by aussiegall
    4. 4. Weʼre a 501c3 corporation headquartered in San Francisco with ~30 employees around the world.
    5. 5. Creative Commons International
    6. 6. Creative Commons International (Weʼre international.)
    7. 7. Weʼre a 501c3 corporation headquartered in San Francisco with 30 employees around the world. • Weʼre a nonprofit.
    8. 8. Weʼre a 501c3 corporation headquartered in San Francisco with 30 employees around the world. • Weʼre a nonprofit. • We do not offer legal services.
    9. 9. Weʼre a 501c3 corporation headquartered in San Francisco with 30 employees around the world. • Weʼre a nonprofit. • We do not offer legal services. We offer free legal and technology tools that allow creators to publish their works on more flexible terms than standard copyright.
    10. 10. Weʼre a 501c3 corporation headquartered in San Francisco with 30 employees around the world. • Weʼre a nonprofit. • We do not offer legal services. We offer free legal and technology tools that allow creators to publish their works on more flexible terms than standard copyright. Terms that allow public sharing, reuse, and remix.
    11. 11. C Before 1976 • Default was free • U.S. Register of Copyrights • Any work fixed in a tangible medium
    12. 12. C Copyright • Law designed to govern creative and expressive works • Encourage creation and promote dissemination
    13. 13. C Before the Internet • Creation and dissemination were via the printing press or film reels • When it wasnʼt so easy to make copies
    14. 14. C 1976 Copyright Act • Automatic Copyright • Life plus 50 years
    15. 15. cba by hyku http://www.flickr.com/photos/hyku/2166224145/
    16. 16. C 1998 CTEA Act (“Sonny Bono” or “Mickey Mouse” Act) • Life plus 70 years • 120 years for corporate works
    17. 17. cba by ivva http://www.flickr.com/photos/ivva/336209777/
    18. 18. cba by ivva http://www.flickr.com/photos/ivva/336209777/
    19. 19. It is illegal to copy, distribute, build upon, or remix copyrighted works.
    20. 20. Break the law or Donʼt use the Internet
    21. 21. C Fair use, or Copyrights Exceptions & Limitations (CEL) • No blanket protection for one kind of use (ie. educational uses) • Rather relies on a host of factors • Can only be determined on a case by case basis, usually in a court of law • Varies drastically by jurisdiction (country to country)
    22. 22. A lot of creators want to share, especially globally. = Musicians, ryancr http://flickr.com/photos/ryanr/142455033/ artists, and educators participate in a sharing and remix culture.
    23. 23. A lot of creators want to share, especially globally. = Musicians, ryancr http://flickr.com/photos/ryanr/142455033/ artists, and educators participate in a sharing and remix culture.
    24. 24. cb by Joi
    25. 25. C 2003 - Eldred v. Ashcroft • Challenged Constitutionality of the 1998 Copyright Extension Act • constantly expanding the term undermines the original intent of copyright
    26. 26. “To promote the Progress of Science and useful Arts, by securing for limited Times to Authors and Inventors the exclusive Right to their respective Writings and Discoveries.”
    27. 27. 7-2
    28. 28. cb by Joi Ito
    29. 29. c
    30. 30. c offers an alternative.
    31. 31. For the Global Networked Age http://flickr.com/photos/wwworks/440672445/ b Woodley Wonderworks e
    32. 32. A simple, standardized way to grant copyright permissions to your creative work.
    33. 33. Step 1: Choose Conditions Attribution Share Alike Non-Commercial No Derivative Works
    34. 34. Step 2: Receive a License
    35. 35. CC Licenses are built on top of copyright law
    36. 36. ✓ CC works within the existing system by allowing movement from “All Rights Reserved” to “Some Rights Reserved”
    37. 37. ✓ CC works within the existing system by allowing movement from “All Rights Reserved” to “Some Rights Reserved”
    38. 38. ✓ CC works within the existing system by allowing movement from “All Rights Reserved” to “Some Rights Reserved” ✓ CC improves copyright by giving creators a choice about which freedoms to grant and which rights to keep
    39. 39. ✓ CC works within the existing system by allowing movement from “All Rights Reserved” to “Some Rights Reserved” ✓ CC improves copyright by giving creators a choice about which freedoms to grant and which rights to keep ✓ CC minimizes transaction costs by granting the public certain permissions beforehand
    40. 40. How do I get one?
    41. 41. CC licenses are expressed in three different ways: human-readable lawyer-readable legal machine-readable commons deed code metadata <a rel="license" href="http:// creativecommons.org/licenses/by/ 3.0/us/"><img alt="Creative Commons License" style="border-width:0" src="http://i.creativecommons.org/ l/by/3.0/us/88x31.png" /></a><br / >This work is licensed under a <a rel="license" href="http:// creativecommons.org/licenses/by/ 3.0/us/">Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 United States License</a>.
    42. 42. 52 Jurisdictions Ported
    43. 43. 52 Jurisdictions Ported
    44. 44. Licensed Objects via Google & Yahoo!
    45. 45. Over 350 million items
    46. 46. Over 133 million photos on Flickr alone
    47. 47. Who is using CC?
    48. 48. Film
    49. 49. Music
    50. 50. Design
    51. 51. Dance
    52. 52. Museum
    53. 53. “CC allows us to change as we grow and thatʼs very valuable – it means we can take small steps toward larger goals and do so as the institution feels comfortable.”
    54. 54. wiki.creativecommons.org/Case_Studies
    55. 55. The Sharing Landscape in Culture before CC Permission Culture Copyright Exceptions and Limitations, ie. Fair use Underground or “Guerrilla” sharing
    56. 56. The Sharing Landscape in Culture after CC Permission Culture Pre-cleared permissions via CC Copyright Exceptions and Limitations, ie. Fair use Visible sharing Remix culture: a community of creators/organizations/institutions not only sharing, but improving adapting, remixing, innovating
    57. 57. Attribute to c with a link to creativecommons.org Creative Commons, ccLearn, the double C in a circle and the open Book in a circle are registered trademarks of Creative Commons in the United States and other countries. Third party marks and brands are the property of their respective holders.
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