Loading…

Flash Player 9 (or above) is needed to view presentations.
We have detected that you do not have it on your computer. To install it, go here.

Like this presentation? Why not share!

Group D

on

  • 401 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
401
Views on SlideShare
401
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Group D Group D Presentation Transcript

  • PRESENTED BY GROUP D: Patrick, Iain, Paul, Albert and Carrene How to avoid RELIEF PHASE DEPENDENCY And encourage SUSTAINABLLE DEVELOPMENT
    • “ A PERSON IS AID DEPENDENT WHEN THEY CANNOT MEET IMMEDIATE BASIC NEEDS IN THE ABSENCE OF RELIEF ASSISTANCE”
    Definition of Relief-Aid Dependency Dependency and Humanitarian Relief, A Critical Analysis – Paul Harvey and Jeremy Lind
  • Dependency According to Group D It is possible that relief interventions can undermine ongoing developmental programs. Once people have become accustomed to receiving relief aid, the fear is that they will be less willing to help themselves and become dependent on hand-outs. We have broken down short-term and medium to long-term areas of relief that are at risk for relief communities to become dependent on.
    • SHORT TERM First Response
    • MEDIUM / LONG TERM
    • Secondary Phase
    • Food
    • Water
    • Shelter
    • Medical treatment
    • Sanitation
    • Protection
    • Relocation
    • Access to water
    • Education
    • Day care centres
    • Legal status
    • Livelihood (Jobs)
    • Sanitation
    • Access to services
    • Community counselling
    RISK AREAS FOR DEPENDENCY
  • SUGGESTIONS
    • HOW TO AVOID RELIEF DEPENDENCY
    • In a situation with stable government a management structure such as IMS should be introduced immediately
    • From the start the controller needs to be clear on the objectives of the relief
    • And if you not clear of the objectives – be clear that you are not clear!!
    • State targeted time frame
    • Be clear on exit strategy as soon as possible
    • The plan should be implemented
    • Communication not only within agencies but crucially with relief communities
    • Self-responsibility of the relief community: they should be engaged to help themselves
  • SUGGESTIONS
    • HOW TO AVOID RELIEF DEPENDENCY
    • Accountability in what needs to be achieved
    • “ Free” should be avoided where possible
    • Beware of media that can create wrong expectations, which can create dependency
    • Link not only with relief agencies, but also development agencies
    • Look at long term sustainable options such as Play-Pumps
    • Set up community counselling based on cultural beliefs - not dependent on the organisations to council
    • Discover skills of those affected – used in assistance and migrate to sustainable development
    • "THE DESERT IS EXPANDING, AND STEADY DELIVERIES OF FOOD AID TO THE BARREN REGION HAVE DRAMATICALLY EXACERBATED ITS PROBLEMS INSTEAD OF ALLEVIATING THEM. IN THE PAST, PEOPLE SLAUGHTERED THEIR ANIMALS FOR FOOD DURING DIFFICULT TIMES, BUT EVER SINCE THE WORLD FOOD PROGRAM BEGAN FEEDING US, HARDLY ANYONE DOES THIS ANYMORE. EVERYONE JUST WAITS FOR THE NEXT DELIVERY."
    Dependency Highlighted Kenya’s former Health Commissioner Musa Okola
  • A LONG LIST OF EXAMPLES
    • The 1980 famine in Karamoja (Uganda) was, in terms of mortality rates, one of the worst in history. 21% of the population died, including 60% of the infants. Approximately 82% of the Karamoja population lives in poverty (defined as less than US$1/day)
    • People hang around waiting for food aid
    • Loss of traditional strategies of survival
    • Demoralisation and disempowerment of the people
    • Strife between communities who receive and those that don’t
    • Perpetual squatting
    • Politicians use aid for personal gain
  • Http://siteresources.worldbank.org/DATASTATISTICS/Resources/table6_11.pdf AID DEPENDENCY RATIOS
  • SELF RELIANCE
    • “ It is important to involve the refugees in the provision of assistance and allow the community to share the responsibility of caring for itself and its vulnerable members. This minimises dependency and encourages self reliance.”
    UNHCR 1999:97
  • 1999 Super Cyclone Orissa
    • 1999 Super cyclone Orissa
    • Storm surge 26 feet carrying 20km inland
    • 17,110km 2 of crops destroyed
    • 275,000 homes destroyed leaving 1.67 million people homeless (another 19.5 million affected)
    • 9,803 deaths
    • 406,000 livestock perished
    • $4.5 billion worth of damages
  • SUCCESS FACTORS
    • Knowledge of pre-cyclone society
    • Food For Work (FFW)
    • Benefits and encouragement for vulnerable
    • Community mobilisation
    • Community institutions
  • SUSTAINABILITY
    • “ Sustainability, in a broad sense, is the capacity to endure. For humans it is the potential for long-term maintenance of wellbeing, which in turn depends on the wellbeing of the natural world and the responsible use of natural resources.”
    WIKIPEDIA
  • A Basic Overview of Ethiopia
    • Ethiopia is a complex emergency
    • Lack of infrastructure and education
    • HIV/AIDS, population growth and violence all complicate the problems created by the drought
    • The drought and aid dependency undermines livelihoods
    • Dry land consists of 66.6% of the country’s total landmass
    • Knowledge of dry land biodiversity is limited
    • Indigenous practices are either unknown or undocumented
  • HARO MICHAEL KEBELE ADMINISTRATION Canadian Physicians for Aid and Relief
    • Jemo Berdade is a farming town 4hrs from Addis Ababa
    • 128 families in the community
    • Farmers have to contend with dry land
    • Limited resources
    • Few sources of support
    • CPAR’s Moving Beyond Hunger (MBH) Program intervened
    • Provided technical and material support
    • Assisting in improved cultivation practices
    • Farmers now have enough food to eat during the year
    • Surplus to sell hence earning income
    • Introduction of irrigation
  • SUSTAINABLE OPTIONS Ideas to Avoid Dependency
    • Bring in development agencies
    • Encourage relief community to help themselves
    • Discover skills of those affected
    • Include reputable job agencies or unions
    • Ownership of projects by the relief community
    • Organising and mobilising communities to work on their own self-sustaining projects
    • Communities can council and support themselves
    • Teach agricultural, farming and planting
  • THANK YOU Be conscious about the existing community when trying to assist and do development with the relief community.