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Nazi Persecution Disabilities

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  • 1. Nazi Persecution: On Disabled By: Timmy Stephen
  • 2. “ Euthanasia” Program
    • eu·tha·na·sia [yoo-thuh-ney-zhuh] -n.   The act or practice of ending the life of an individual suffering from a terminal illness or an incurable condition
    • “ painless death”
  • 3.
    • In 1939, Adolf Hitler initiated a decree which empowered physicians to grant a "mercy death" to "patients considered incurable
    • The intent of this program was NOT to relieve the suffering of the program BUT to exterminated the mentally ill and handicapped, “cleansing the Aryan race”
  • 4.
    • In the beginning, patients were killed by lethal injections
  • 5.
    • Then carbon monoxide gas became the preferred method of killing. This led to the creation of the first gas chambers.
  • 6.
    • Hitler's regime continued to send to physicians and the general public the message that mental patients were "useless eaters" and life unworthy of life
    • Doctors were encouraged to decide on their own who should live or die, Killing became part of hospital routine as patients were put to death by:
      • Starvation
      • Poisoning
      • injections
    Buses used to transport patients to Hadamar euthanasia center. The windows were painted to prevent people from seeing those inside. Germany, between May and September 1941.
  • 7.
    • Thousands of mental patients were killed in Poland, Russia, and East Prussia by SS and other special police units from the invading Germany
  • 8. Statistics
    • In October 1939, these SS police units shot about 3,700 mental patients in asylums in Poland
  • 9. In December of that year and January of the following, 1,558 patients from Polish asylums were gassed in gas vans by the SS.
  • 10.
    • In all, between 200,000 and 250,000 mentally and physically handicapped persons were murdered from 1939 to 1945 under the “Euthanasia” programs.
    • Killings even continued in some of Germany's mental asylums weeks after Allied troops had occupied surrounding areas.
  • 11.
    • Records discovered after the war documented 70,273 deaths by gassing at the six "euthanasia" centers between January 1940 and August 1941
    • All Jewish mental patients were killed regardless of their ability to work or the seriousness of their illness.
  • 12.
    • DID ANYONE DO ANYTHING TO STOP THE KILLINGS?
  • 13.
    • Yes, there were some people who tried to stop “euthanasia” programs.A handful of church leaders, local judges, physicians, and parents of victims protested
    • One psychiatrist and his son, a Protestant minister urged church groups to pressure church-run institutions not to release their disabled patients to the authorities
  • 14. The End

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