Five Stages Of Spelling Development

39,206 views
38,827 views

Published on

0 Comments
2 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
39,206
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
95
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
135
Comments
0
Likes
2
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Five Stages Of Spelling Development

  1. 1. Five Stages of Spelling Development<br />
  2. 2. Stage 1: Emergent Spelling<br />In this stage children are able to string scribbles, letters, and letter-like <br />forms together, but they do not associate the marks they make with any <br />specific phonemes. This stage is typical of students 3- to 5-year-olds. The<br />students learn these concepts:<br /><ul><li>The distinction between drawing and writing
  3. 3. How to make letters
  4. 4. The direction of writing on a page
  5. 5. Some letter-sound matches</li></li></ul><li>Stage 2: Letter Name-Alphabetic Spelling<br />In this stage, children learn to represent phonemes in words with letters. At <br />first, their spellings are quite abbreviated, but they learn to use consonant <br />blends and digraphs and short-vowel patterns to spell many short-vowel <br />words. Spellers are 5- to 7-year olds, and children learn these concepts by:<br /><ul><li>The alphabetic principle
  6. 6. Consonant sounds
  7. 7. Short vowel sounds
  8. 8. Consonant blends and digraphs</li></li></ul><li>Stage 3: Within-Word Pattern Spelling<br />Students learn long-vowel patterns and r-controlled vowels, but they may <br />still confuse spelling patterns and spell words such as “meet” as “mete,” and<br />they often reverse the order of letters, such as “form” to “from.” These <br />spellers are 7- to 9-years-old, and they learn these concepts by:<br /><ul><li>Long-vowel spelling patterns
  9. 9. r-controlled vowels
  10. 10. More-complex consonant patterns
  11. 11. Diphthongs and other less common vowel patterns</li></li></ul><li>Stage 4: Syllables & Affixes Spelling<br />In this stage, students apply what they have learned about one-syllable<br />words to spell longer words, and they learn to break words into syllables.<br />They also learn to add inflectional endings – such as –es, -ed, -ing, and to<br />differentiate between homophone, such as the word “your – you’re.” These<br />spellers are often 9- to 11-years-old, and they learn these concepts by:<br /><ul><li>Inflectional endings
  12. 12. Rules for adding inflectional endings
  13. 13. Syllabication
  14. 14. Homophones</li></li></ul><li>Stage 5: Derivational Relations Spelling<br />In this stage, students are able to explore the relationship between spelling <br />and meaning and learn that words with related meanings are often related <br />in spelling despite changes in sound – such as “wise – wisdom.” They also<br />learn about Latin and Greek root words and derivational affixes – such as<br />“pre-, -able, and –tion.” Spellers are 11- to 14-years-old, and these students<br />learn these concepts by:<br /><ul><li>Consonant alternations
  15. 15. Vowel alternations
  16. 16. Latin affixes and root words
  17. 17. Greek affixes and root words
  18. 18. Etymologies</li>

×