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Behaviorism
Behaviorism
Behaviorism
Behaviorism
Behaviorism
Behaviorism
Behaviorism
Behaviorism
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Behaviorism

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  • 1. Behaviorism
    S. Dupree
  • 2. Behaviorism
    The prediction and control of human behavior in which introspection and/or independent thinking play no essential part of it’s teaching method.
    Operates on a principle of “stimulus-response.”
    All behavior is caused by an external stimuli.
    Human learning is considered a purely objective and experimental branch of natural science.
    No internal cognitive processing.
  • 3. Ivan Pavlov (1849-1936)
    Famous for his behavioral
    experiments with dogs.
    Used classical conditioning
    teach dogs to salivate when
    rang a bell.
    Classical Conditioning- the natural reflex that occurs in response to a stimulus.
    http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_55anICIekBQ/Sbp8dPhn_KI/AAAAAAAAAR4/rskELBleH9A/s400/Ivan_Pavlov.jpg
  • 4. B.F. Skinner (1904-1990)
    Famous for his experiments
    with pigeons.
    Used operant conditioning to teach pigeons how to engage in complex tasks such as dancing & bowling.
    Operant Conditioning- learning that is controlled and results in shaping behavior through reinforcement of stimulus response patterns.
    http://www.psychology.uiowa.edu/Faculty/wasserman/Glossary/skinner.jpg
  • 5. Albert Bandura(1925-)
    Famous for his ideas on social
    learning which he renamed
    Social Cognitive Theory.
    Focuses on motivational factors and self-regulatory mechanisms that contribute to a person’s behavior.
    Believed that people acquire behaviors first through observation of others and then imitate what they have observed.
    http://news.stanford.edu/news/2006/february22/gifs/ppl_bandura.jpg
  • 6. Classroom Implications for Teachers
    Teach through a system of positive and negative rewards.
    Use computer time effectively as a part of a behavior management system.
    Apply observational modeling extensively in the context of behavior modification.
  • 7. Classroom Implications for Students
    Necessary conditions for effective modeling:
    Attention- students attention must be kept.
    Retention- students need to remember what they’re paying attention to. (Includes symbolic coding, mental images, cognitive organization, symbolic rehearsal, motor rehearsal)
    Reproduction- students need to be able to reproduce what they have learned. (Including physical capabilities, and self-observation of reproduction.)
    Motivation- students need to have a good reason to imitate the behavior modeled.
  • 8. My opinion
    I think the behaviorist approach to teaching can be a very effective way for students to learn. However, not all students learn the same and I must adapt my teaching to the way the student learns.
    I think that using Bandura’s theory of observational modeling will be very effective in the grade I want to teach (pre-school/kindergarten) because kids that young do tend to model the behaviors of others.

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