Measurement

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Measurement

  1. 1. <ul><li>When you come in, please get out your lab materials from yesterday. Do what you need to do to complete the lab (weigh sand) and complete the calculations. I will be collecting it in fifteen to twenty minutes. Finish up! If you are done, study for the quiz today. </li></ul>
  2. 2. Section 3.1-3.3
  3. 3. <ul><li>A measurement contains two things: </li></ul><ul><li>Number </li></ul><ul><li>Unit </li></ul><ul><li>The unit typically used in the sciences are those of the International System of Units. </li></ul>Quantity SI base Unit Symbol Length Meter m Mass Kilogram kg Temp Kelvin K Time Second s Amount of substance Mole mol
  4. 4. <ul><li>Some number used in science are just too big to write out… </li></ul><ul><li>For example: </li></ul><ul><li>There are a 602,000,000,000,000,000,000 hydrogen atoms in a gram of hydrogen. </li></ul><ul><li>An atom of Au has a mass of 0.000000000000000000000327 gram </li></ul><ul><li>So what do we do? </li></ul>
  5. 5. <ul><li>A number in scientific notation is a product of two numbers: </li></ul><ul><li>A coefficient (1≤X<10) </li></ul><ul><li>10 raised to a power </li></ul><ul><li>Ex: 645,000 </li></ul><ul><li>Scientific notation: 6.45 X 10 5 </li></ul><ul><li>This is the same as saying 6.45 X 10 X 10 X 10 X 10 X 10 </li></ul>
  6. 6. <ul><li>Ex: 0.000045 </li></ul><ul><li>Scientific Notation: 4.5 X 10 -5 </li></ul><ul><li>This is the same as saying 4.5 ÷ 10 ÷ 10 ÷ 10 ÷ 10 ÷ 10 </li></ul>
  7. 7. <ul><li>Ex: 7.054 X 10 6 </li></ul><ul><li>Ex: 4.7 X 10 -7 </li></ul>
  8. 8. <ul><li>Please complete 1-43 ODD on your own </li></ul>
  9. 9. <ul><li>The unit typically used in the sciences are those of the International System of Units. </li></ul>Quantity SI base Unit Symbol Length Meter m Mass Kilogram kg Temp Kelvin K Time Second s Amount of substance Mole mol
  10. 10. <ul><li>1. How many years are in a CENTury? </li></ul><ul><li>How many CENTimeters are in a meter? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>A centimeter is 1/100 th of a meter </li></ul></ul><ul><li>How many grams are in a KILOgram? </li></ul><ul><li>Take a look at the handout… </li></ul>
  11. 11. <ul><li>Making the connection… </li></ul><ul><li>We know that there are 100cm in 1 meter. But how do I determine how many centimeters are in an inch? </li></ul>
  12. 12. <ul><li>Accuracy: How does your value compare to a known (or accepted value)? </li></ul><ul><li>Precision: How does one of your values compare to all of them? If you take multiple measurements, are they all close in value? </li></ul><ul><li>Tips for the lab: It does not necessarily matter where you measure from exactly. Just be sure that the length you measure in inches is exactly that same length you measure in centimeters . </li></ul>
  13. 13. <ul><li>HW due Monday: pg 58-59 (#36 37, 38, 39, 44, 45, 46, 48, 49a, 52, 54, 55, 56, 67, 69, 70) </li></ul><ul><li>Tonight: Suggested Readings (3.1-3.3) </li></ul><ul><li>Tomorrow: Sig Figs (3.1) </li></ul><ul><li>Thursday: Dimensional Analysis (3.3) </li></ul><ul><li>Check out the Helpful websites – There is a good site describing physical and chemical properties and changes. </li></ul>

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