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Mexican Folkloric Ballet
Mexican Folkloric Ballet
Mexican Folkloric Ballet
Mexican Folkloric Ballet
Mexican Folkloric Ballet
Mexican Folkloric Ballet
Mexican Folkloric Ballet
Mexican Folkloric Ballet
Mexican Folkloric Ballet
Mexican Folkloric Ballet
Mexican Folkloric Ballet
Mexican Folkloric Ballet
Mexican Folkloric Ballet
Mexican Folkloric Ballet
Mexican Folkloric Ballet
Mexican Folkloric Ballet
Mexican Folkloric Ballet
Mexican Folkloric Ballet
Mexican Folkloric Ballet
Mexican Folkloric Ballet
Mexican Folkloric Ballet
Mexican Folkloric Ballet
Mexican Folkloric Ballet
Mexican Folkloric Ballet
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Mexican Folkloric Ballet

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  • 1. F olkloric Ballet Manchester
  • 2. Michoacán Michoacán is one of the province states that dispute the musical and popular dance supremacy in Mexico. It is a beautiful state full of traditions in food, handcrafts, music and dance. The richness of this state's culture consists in a combination of its strong ethnic roots and strong Spanish influence. As in many of the Mexican dances, Michoacán dances combine religion and pre-Colombian traditions. The mosaic begins with the one of the most popular dances of this state "La Danza de los Viejitos" (Dance of the old men), that is danced mainly by men, wearing a Purepecha styled costume with a "morral" (bag) and a "sombrero" from which colorful ribons are hanging.
  • 3. Nayarit
  • 4. Machetes
  • 5. Jalisco Known as the land of mariachis and the infamous "Jarabe Tapatio," known as the "Mexican hat dance" is embraced as the national dance of México. The folklore in Jalisco has turned into one of the national symbols par excellence. Dances and tunes (sones) reached a development in the late decades of the last century, such as the Dance of the Rope and the Jarabe Tapatio, along with La Negra. With their rhythmic footwork, large sombrero charro, and colorful dresses, the dances from Jalisco express the characteristics of the Mexican culture and evoke the heart and soul of Mexico.
  • 6. El Gusto El son de la negra
  • 7. Sinaloa
  • 8. El Gallito
  • 9. Chihuahua North The northern part of Mexico also known as el Norte is recognized for its energetic and joyful dances. These dances, the polkas, chotis and redovas became popular during the Mexican Revolution of 1910 with some dances evolving as recently as the 1970's. The music and dance forms are highly influenced by Central European countries, including Austria, Czechoslovakia, and Germany, mother of the accordion sound that is now symbolic of "norteño" music.
  • 10. Veracruz Veracruz is the land of fishermen and home of the oldest and most important port in Mexico. Their music is comprised of a mixture of Spanish music influenced by African and Caribbean rhythms. This lively and contagious music is played on a harp, jarana (small guitar), and requinto (small rhythm guitar). Its dances, Sones and Jarabes are made up of very intricate footwork or “zapateados” with flamenco characteristics. The complex footwork is the emphasis in the fast- paced Veracruz dances. The women wear beautiful white long dresses decorated with gold that represent the ocean and sea life.
  • 11. Bruja Dance
  • 12. La Bamba
  • 13. Tilingo Lingo Coco
  • 14. End

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