HISTORY OF SCIENCEEEEEE
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HISTORY OF SCIENCEEEEEE

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BY RICHARD AND SASHA

BY RICHARD AND SASHA

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HISTORY OF SCIENCEEEEEE HISTORY OF SCIENCEEEEEE Presentation Transcript

  • Marie curie
    History of Science
  • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marie_Curie
    Marie Skłodowska- Curie
    (November 7, 1867 - July 4, 1934)
  • Marie Curie's discoveries
    She discovered that the strength of the rays that came out was depended only on the amount of uranium in the compound.
    Marie made up the term “radioactivity.”
  • Marie Curie's discoveries
    Marie turned her attention to minerals, she found her interest drawn to pitchblende.
    Discovered two new elements: polonium and radium.
  • A lump of pitchblende
  • Marie and Pierre Curie
    Wedding photo of Pierre and Marie Curie, 1895.
    Copyright © Association Curie Joliot-Curie
  • How do Marie's discoveries help our world
    Radium was/is used as a medicine. Radium could be used to slow the process of cancer and many other illnesses. Radium was used to save many people lives.
    Marie Curie became a role model for women who wanted to do more in their life.
    Marie Curie’s work became a foundation for treating cancer, manipulating nuclear energy, and creating atomic bombs, along with many other contributions.
  • Marie Curie’s contributions during World War 1
    During World War 1, Marie looked for ways her science could help. She established a front-line X-ray service used for treating wounded solders.
  • http://www.marie-curie.cepeo.on.ca/Portals/37/Marie-Curie5.gif
    “Petite Curie”
  • Marie Curie’s contributions during World War 1
    At the Radium Institute she prepared tiny glass tubes containing a radioactive gas (radon) also used to treat wounded solders.
  • Timeline
    Marie was born on November 7, 1867, in Warsaw, the capital city of Poland.
    Maria graduated from high school at the age of 15 with the highest honours.
    In 1891, she registered at the Sorbonne University and within three years she completed master’s degrees in physics and math.
  • Timeline
    Married Pierre Curie in July 1895.
    Gave birth to their first daughter, Irène, in September 1897.
    Over the next two years, Marie completed her research on the magnetic properties of steels.
    In July 1898, she discovered polonium.
    December 1898 discovered radium.
    In 1903, she received a doctorate in science.
    In 1903, Pierre and Marie received Nobel Prize for Physics.
  • Timeline
    April 19, 1906 Pierre died.
    In May 1906 Marie became first female professor at Sorbonne university.
    In 1911, Marie received Nobel Prize for Chemistry.
    In 1914, she was apointed Director of the Curie Laboratory in the Radium Institute of the University of Paris.
  • Timeline
    In 1921, President Harding of the United States, on behalf of the women of America, presented her with one gram of radium in recognition of her service to science.
    July 4, 1934 Marie Curie died.
  • Awards
    Nobel Prize in Physics (1903)
    (jointly with her husband and A. H. Becquerel )
    Davy Medal of the Royal Society (1903) (jointly with her husband)
    Matteucci Medal (1904)
    Nobel Prize in Chemistry (1911)
  • Recognition
    The curie is a basic unit of measurement for describing radioactivity.
  • Death
    On July 4, 1934, Marie Curie died of aplastic anemia, a blood disease that is contracted by handling too much radioactive material.
  • Quote
    “Scientific work must not be considered from the point of view of the direct usefulness of it. It must be done for itself, for the beauty of science, and then there is always the chance that a scientific discovery may become like radium, a benefit.”
  • References
    http://nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/physics/laureates/1903/marie-curie-bio.html "Marie Curie“
    http://www.sciencemuseum.org.uk/onlinestuff/stories/marie_curie_and_the_history_of_radioactivity.aspx "Marie Curie and the History of Radiology“
    http://web.mit.edu/invent/iow/curie.html "Discovery of Radium and Polonium“
    http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/146871/Marie-Curie “Marie Curie”
    http://nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/physics/laureates/1903/
  • THE END