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Buro Happold Ltd.10 year book Europe.

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  • 1. Buro Happold Ten Years in North Europe
  • 2. Ten Years in North Europe
  • 3. Acknowledgments This book marks ten years of practice for Buro Happold in North Europe – ten years that would not have been possible without the collaboration of our clients whom we are extremely fortunate to have worked with over the last decade, our working partnership with architects, construction professionals and contractors with whom we have collaborated with over this period and of course our staff who have worked with the practice. Without all of these contributors, none of our success in the region would have been possible. 02
  • 4. When I joined the practice over twenty funny descriptions he would give years ago, I was fortunate enough to of a problem recently solved, or his work with our founder, Ted Happold, infectious enthusiasm for finding as a graduate engineer in Bath. Working alternative solutions to other seemingly Roderick Manson with Ted provided a perfect opportunity intractable problems. He also dealt as Partner and Regional Director for a young engineer to learn and capably with business matters as with B u ro H a p p o l d develop his skills in the built environment theoretical and creative questions. Glasgow and develop the appreciation of Edinburgh architecture and engineering. It has been a privilege to act as Belfast custodian of these values and to Copenhagen Ted Happold died in 1996, but his continue the growth of the practice in influence on the firm is enduring and the region. This book has provided an remains core to our values and excellent opportunity to look back at principles. Ted Happold was a Quaker, some of our great projects over the and his deep sense of humanity and last ten years and share some of these principles can still be found in much of experiences with our clients, friends, the work undertaken by the firm. Ted colleagues and fellow professionals. was a man with ideas and had an inspiring ability to convey them and to solve problems. It is not possible to forget the lengthy and often incredibly 03
  • 5. Foreword 06 Robin House, Balloch 62 European Patent Office 132 The First Decade 10 Children’s Hospice University of Strathclyde 134 Project Review Glenturret Distillery Centre 68 Projects The Tannahill Centre 16 New Scottish Parliament 70 Stirling Sports Village 138 Theatre Royal 18 Glasgow Audi 72 John Wheatley College 140 St Andrews International 20 Perth Concert Hall 78 Ravenscraig Regional 142 Centre THGL Studios 84 Sports Facility Tolbooth 22 The Aqualibrium Centre 86 Queen Margaret University 144 Tramway 24 The Wright Business Centre 92 Riverside Museum, Glasgow 146 Museum of Transport Urban Outfitters 26 BAA Car Parks 94 The Museum of Liverpool 152 ERCO 28 Edinburgh’s Telford College 96 Dundee City Council 158 Urquhart Castle Visitor’s 34 Royal Botanic Garden 102 Headquarters Centre 34 Edinburgh Forth Ports Hub Masterplan 160 Pitlochry Festival Theatre 36 Alsion Campus at Syddansk 104 University Loch Lomond and the 162 Royal Lyceum Theatre 38 Trossachs Headquarters Clydebank Re-built 110 Hopetoun House 40 Children’s Discovery Centre 164 University of Edinburgh 114 Eastgate Arts Centre 42 Wexford Council Offices 166 Projects National Park 44 Greenock Arts Centre 168 Royal Commonwealth Pool 120 Gateway Centre Queens University Belfast 122 Everton FC Stadium 170 Danish National 46 Projects New Gateway Centre 172 Opera House The Calyx, Scotland’s 128 Sectors 174 Anchor Mills 52 National Garden Gateway The Galeri Caernarfon 54 Awards 176 Hazelwood School 130 04
  • 6. Contents 05
  • 7. Foreword The first time I met Rod Manson he told me about his plans to make Buro Happold’s Glasgow office the hub for its northern European activities. I was impressed by his ambition. It was refreshing to talk to someone that imagined a future in which Scotland was at the centre of a network of northern economies, rather than floundering on the edge. 06
  • 8. The first time I met Rod Manson he architects in Scotland and with Scottish Ten years ago architects in Scotland told me about his plans to make architects exporting their design talents. often complained that, with a few over- Buro Happold’s Glasgow office the Wexford Council Offices, in Ireland by subscribed exceptions, they struggled hub for its northern European activities. Glasgow–based NORD, engineering by to find engineers that could provide I was impressed by his ambition. It was Buro Happold, will shortly go on site. them anything but the most perfunctory refreshing to talk to someone that imagined design solution. Since then a number a future in which Scotland was at the The benefits of having internationally of the internationally recognised centre of a network of northern economies, recognised engineering firms, like engineering practices, (most of which rather than floundering on the edge. Buro Happold, operating in Scotland themselves came out of Ove Arup in are obvious. Not only does the local the 1960s and 1970s) have set up in In just over a decade Manson has construction industry benefit from their offices in Scotland. moved a long way towards realising wide-ranging expertise but the local his ambition. The Glasgow office, economy benefits from the export of Buro Happold chose precisely the right which was set up with two staff in engineering skills. Their presence also moment to set up a North Europe office in 1996, now employs more than 150. has implications for the Scottish Glasgow. Public sector spending on public Since the millennium Buro Happold engineering profession and for architects. buildings, schools and higher education has opened offices in Dublin, Edinburgh In the past engineers living in Scotland colleges and hospitals and a very buoyant and Belfast and last year it set up shop would often move abroad in pursuit of residential market has meant that the in Copenhagen. The practice is now challenging commissions. Today, with construction sector in the UK, Scotland working on the design of some of the the help of increasingly sophisticated and Ireland has witnessed a decade of most significant new buildings in information technology, building growth. Between 2000-2005 Gross Scotland, Ireland and Denmark. management systems and new air links, Added Value provided by the construction engineers can be based in Scotland sector to the Scottish economy increased They have been working with Danish and provide ‘hands-on’ services across by 37%. The sector currently employs architects in the UK, Northern Irish Northern Europe and beyond. more people than manufacturing. 07
  • 9. As construction has grown, building Today they are often commissioned sustainability. They have recently services have become an increasingly to provide a full range of engineering delivered an ‘Excellent’ BREEAM rating important chunk of capital expenditure. services including the structure, services, on the plans for Dundee City Council Driven by the increasing demands for fire and sustainability performance. Their HQ by Reiach and Hall and they are energy efficiency set out in the Building workload seems to involve increasingly exploring innovative, sustainable timber Standards and Planning Guidance, the sophisticated building programmes, technology in both the design of the design of services is no longer the such as Robin House, a children’s Royal Botanics visitors centre with poor cousins to structural design. The hospice, designed by Gareth Hoskins Ted Cullinan and the Loch Lomond environmental control of a building is and the Aqualibrium, Cambeltown by and Trossachs HQ with Page and Park. now a central feature of the early stages PagePark. Both projects combine a At Telford College, Buro Happold of design. In this context Buro Happold, swimming pool alongside other very worked with HOK on the design of which is was founded on the idea of a different functions. a lightweight ETFE translucent roof, creative partnership between engineers structural technology pioneered by and architects, has flourished. Buro Happold’s structural engineers are founder Ted Happold. working with Zaha Hadid, 3XN and HOK In its early years, Buro Happold’s on the design of complex geometries. The practice remains strongly Glasgow office tended to be At the same time working with practices committed to the approach adopted commissioned as services engineers, that produce very restrained buildings in by Ted Happold, who is probably best working alongside other structural which the structure and services must known for the central role that he played designers. Working with Richard Murphy contribute to the clarity and simplicity of in the design of the Pompidou Centre they designed the services for a number the architecture. along side Piano and Richard Rogers. of multi-use arts projects: Stirling Tolbooth In 1971 it was, reportedly, Happold that in 2002, the Eastgate Art Centre in Increasingly Buro Happold, like persuaded Rogers and Piano to enter Peebles in 2004 and the award winning many multi-disciplinary engineers, is the competition. Galeri Caernarfon in 2005. being asked by clients to focus on 08
  • 10. Happold embodied the idea of 85 years on that sense of shared Penny Lewis ‘comradeship’ within the design team ambition between architect and and was committed to the idea that engineer is still central to the creation Penny Lewis is the Editor of Prospect, the Scottish architecture professional practice, research and of good architecture. Today’s engineers magazine and the website education should all go hand-in-hand. often seem more at ease than architects www.architecturescotland.co.uk. He set up practice with seven partners in a development industry in which the She is the Scottish correspondent in 1976, while running Bath’s School process is often as important as the for A10 and writes on a freelance of Engineering and Architecture. The product. At a time when architecture is basis for UK and international publications. She is author of business now has 20 offices and a often treated as a discrete, self-sufficient Curious Rationalism, a mono-graph multi-million pound turnover, but add-on in the development process, its on the work of Gordon Murray Happold’s sense of public responsibility reassuring to meet, and work alongside, and Alan Dunlop Architects. lives on. engineers like Buro Happold that take architecture very seriously. “The Engineer, inspired by the law of Economy and governed by mathematical calculation, puts us in accord with universal law. He achieves harmony,” wrote Le Corbusier in Towards a New Architecture 1923. “The engineering aesthetic, and architecture, are two things that march together and follow on one from the other,” he added capturing the creative tension between architect and engineer. 09
  • 11. The First Decade Care, Value and Elegance Looking back over a decade of Buro Happold projects in the north of Europe, working initially in Glasgow but more recently in Edinburgh, Belfast and now Copenhagen, a couple of themes become clear. Care for the environment is a key note ringing through all these projects. 10
  • 12. Whether it is as a major feature to meet internally when the practice is delivering increasing numbers of projects in client demands, such as in the building more than one discipline, or externally Edinburgh and Belfast led to offices design for the Syddansk University through how our staff deal with clients, opening there in 2006. The Edinburgh where we had to outperform Danish architects, contractors and all the other team in particular has subsequently Building Regulations on energy use by members that make up a successful seen rapid growth, expanding from the 30%, or simply as ‘part of the package’, project team, effective collaboration initial team which established the office, low energy buildings are always a plays a key role. This emphasis on to more than 50 in 2007. priority for Buro Happold. Our work on communication and engagement with the Glasgow Museum of Transport is project partners is vital both to the We moved into our Glasgow design a good example of the latter. The success of all these projects and to studio in 2001, at Four Winds in Pacific client’s primary demand here is for how Buro Happold does business. Quay in Glasgow. This former steam- unobtrusive services, but our engineers powered hydraulic pumping station was have worked hard to identify ways to The spirit of collaboration is not confined built in 1894 to power cranes unloading incorporate low energy heating and to project work, of course, and in the ships at the adjacent Price’s Dock. lighting systems to meet this particularly course of the decade we’ve made The building’s octagonal chimney was challenging brief. some good friends as the business has inspired by ‘The Tower of the Winds’ grown. We began in the Glasgow office, at the Acropolis in Athens and features Collaboration is the other thread running which opened with just two staff in 1996 eight sculptured panels representing the through all these projects. Whether it is (and now employs more than 150), but four winds, giving the building its name. 11
  • 13. The First Decade Care, Value and Elegance Four Winds With the help of some advice from Consulting services are particularly Also, and perhaps more importantly, DEGW, this new studio has created the well represented, forming a major the real achievement linking the projects perfect workspace to allow collaboration part of what Buro Happold can offer, in this book is the use of the core values amongst all our consultants in an open in addition to the core disciplines at the heart of every Buro Happold plan environment. of structural and building services project – the principles of care, value engineering. The specialist services and elegance which founder Ted It was a logical move to establish another include: fire engineering, computer Happold set out as key to everything office, in Denmark in 2007. Home to simulation and analysis of the internal the practice does when he set it up in some of the architects we are working environment, infrastructure and 1976. There are many other projects with the most at the moment, as well as environment, sustainability and we would have liked to have included some of our most prestigious projects alternative technologies, lighting but it is hoped that the chosen selection of the last decade, Copenhagen is a technologies and inclusive design can provide a good example of the sensible first step onto mainland North services to ensure building accessibility type and nature of our work. Europe – and hopefully not our last. for all. As buildings become ever more complex, these services become When we established the Glasgow The growth in staff numbers has been increasingly important and add greatly office some 20 years later, it was with matched by the increasing range of to the practice’s multi-disciplinary a similarly small group of determined disciplines Buro Happold offers in capabilities. engineers, keen to make a difference North Europe. The practice’s Specialist to the quality of buildings going up in 12
  • 14. the region. As established by Ted, In addition, the last decade has seen a we used the ingenuity, innovation and huge opportunity to work in the global courage to work differently and now arena from our base in the region and we are able to push these core values this is demonstrated through the local much further afield. delivery of our range of current projects across Europe and the Middle East During this period, we have worked being delivered locally. with some of the most creative architects in the region and indeed have The principles set out by Ted, that have seen the general appreciation of both served us so well for the last decade, sustainability and creative design will continue to inform and guide our solutions become much more significant work, helping us to maintain our position in the drive to create better projects to at the cutting edge of building design. match our clients and users’ higher We look forward to the next decade of expectations. As engineers, we feel Buro Happold innovation, collaboration rewarded when we are able to influence and inspiration, in buildings and the design of projects and work closely infrastructure right across North Europe. with the team to provide integrated sustainable solutions. 13
  • 15. 14
  • 16. Project Review 15
  • 17. The Tannahill Centre Paisley, UK Completion: 1996 The Tannahill Centre in Ferguslie Park caters for the needs of both the local community and the corporate world under one roof. The space includes a family centre, community forum, housing association office and shops. Buro Happold worked with the architects to create a comfortable environment in this versatile facility integrated with the structural form and by installing under floor heating, a natural ventilation strategy for the overall building and specially designed lighting solutions that utilise natural light whenever possible. This people-friendly technology ensures a contemporary and welcoming feel to the Centre, helping it to become the hub of the local community. The Centre was awarded the Scottish Enterprise Regeneration Award in 1996. 16
  • 18. Client: Ferguslie Park Civic Centre Architect: James Cunning Young and Partners Disciplines: Building services engineering, structural engineering, ground engineering, civil engineering Value: £8m Scottish Enterprise Regeneration Award 1997 – Winner RIBA Award 1997 – Winner 17
  • 19. Theatre Royal Glasgow, UK Completion: 1997 The Category A listed Theatre Royal in Glasgow provides high quality entertainment in a setting that combines traditional style with contemporary sophistication. Buro Happold provided structural and building engineering services during the upgrade to the 1,700-seat auditorium, which improved audience facilities while incorporating a larger orchestra pit and chair store. By working with the architect to design a new specialist lighting system, illumination levels and energy efficiency have been vastly improved while maintaining the period style. A new fire detection and alarm system was also installed, ensuring the comfort and safety of the audience. These innovations led to recognition in the 1998 National Lighting Awards. 18
  • 20. Client: Theatre Royal Glasgow Architect: LDN Architects Disciplines: Building services engineering, structural engineering Value: £3m National Lighting Design Awards 1998 – Commendation 19
  • 21. St Andrews International Centre St Andrews, UK Completion: 2000 Sited opposite the 17th fairway of the world famous St Andrews golf course, this four-storey rotunda was designed as a visitor and exhibition centre, complete with first class members’ club services, including bars, sauna and gym facilities. The steel-frame of the structure, which is particularly prominent at the entrance, helps give the building a luxurious, high quality feel. Now part of the University of St Andrews, the International Centre is home to its School of Management and is attended by 200 Masters students. The main postgraduate research area is on the top floor, where study takes place beneath a spectacular circular skylight, complete with a unique mosaic detail. 20
  • 22. Client: St Andrews International Ltd Architects: Davis Duncan Partnership Disciplines: Building services engineering, structural engineering, civil engineering, ground engineering, highway road design, waste water, computational simulation and analysis (CoSA) Value: £8m 21
  • 23. Tolbooth Stirling, UK Completion: 2002 The £5m Heritage Lottery-funded transformation of Stirling’s historic Tolbooth into a music and arts venue was an extremely ambitious project. The challenges included creating ventilation techniques in order to comply with rigorous acoustic criteria throughout the 200-seat auditorium. A key feature was to integrate the lighting, sound and IT systems without compromising the existing building fabric. The venue has contributed significantly to the local community, hosting a year-round programme of concerts, while focusing on education and training for young people. The Tolbooth was awarded the Crown Estate Commission’s Conservation Award at the 2002 Stirling Prize for architecture. 22
  • 24. Client: Stirling Council Architect: Richard Murphy Architects Disciplines: Building services engineering, computational simulation and analysis (CoSA) Value: £5m Civic Trust Awards 2003 – Winner RIBA Award 2002 – Winner RIBA Crown Estate Commission Conservation Award 2002 – Winner Dundee by Design Award 2002 – Winner Scottish Enterprise Dynamic Place Award 2002 – Winner 23
  • 25. Tramway Glasgow, UK Completion: 2001 Work to improve the Tramway arts venue, in South Glasgow, consisted of refurbishing the existing building to improve facilities for – and the comfort of – both audience and performers alike. Buro Happold provided structural and buildings services engineering design for the project, which also included exposing the original tramlines, neatly linking the contemporary venue with the building’s history. Sightlines within the auditorium were dramatically improved with the removal of internal columns. Internal conditions have been greatly improved through ingenious use of ventilation and daylighting, linked with renewable energy generation. The stable spaces on the first floor were also turned into a café bar, rehearsal and workshop areas. The Tramway won the Scottish Design Awards Best Public Building Category in 2001 and Grand Prix 2001. 24
  • 26. Client: Glasgow City Council Architect: Zoo Architects Disciplines: Building services engineering, structural engineering, ground engineering, computational simulation and analysis (CoSA) Value: £4m Scottish Design Awards 2001 Architecture Grand Prix – Winner Scottish Design Awards 2001 Best Public Building – Winner GIA Awards 2000 – Arts Award – Winner 25
  • 27. Urban Outfitters Glasgow and Dublin Completion: 2002 and 2003 Buro Happold provided a variety of services for these quality retail outlets in Dublin and Glasgow. Both branches required significant work to maintain the Urban Outfitters identity, integrating with its other 25 flagship stores in the United States and across Europe. The Glasgow store fit-out took place behind the listed facade of an old stock exchange building and saw installation of new floors, feature staircases and platform podiums. The Dublin store has exposed ventilation and cable ducting to create an edgy, urban feel, exemplified in the client’s request for exposed concrete and no suspended ceilings. 26
  • 28. Client: Urban Outfitters, Glasgow Architect: Pompei AD Disciplines: Building services engineering, structural engineering, fire engineering design and risk assessment (FEDRA), computational simulation and analysis (CoSA), design management (DM) Value: £5m in total 27
  • 29. ERCO – East Renfrewshire Council Offices Barrhead, UK Completion: 2002 From the outset, the headquarters of East Renfrewshire Council, in Barrhead near Glasgow, was designed to be an exemplar low energy office building. With government policy so strongly in favour of sustainability, this three storey office had to very clearly demonstrate that good design, minimal energy consumption and value for money, all-important on a publicly-funded project, can sit happily together. Having been engaged to provide both structural and building heat purge overnight to reduce temperature gains made in the services engineering, Buro Happold’s team was ideally placed day, this process can be repeated daily. The concrete’s slow to meet the client’s aspirations. This is exemplified in the temperature change also helps heat introduced in winter extensive use of exposed structural concrete to help moderate remain in the building. internal temperature changes. By using as much as possible of the thermal mass of the reinforced concrete frame, along The building services design includes mixed mode ventilation with natural ventilation, no mechanical cooling is required to systems combining displacement ventilation and opening maintain comfortable working conditions all year round. windows. Other energy-saving features include a link between internal lighting and external daylight conditions so as to make This was all verified by Buro Happold’s computational the most of natural lighting and therefore cut energy costs. 3 simulation and analysis group (CoSA), which produced a dynamic thermal model of the building to assess the strategy. The work illustrated the great advantage of using the concrete as a thermal store. As concrete heats slowly, it keeps a room cooler for longer during hot summer days. Providing there is a 28
  • 30. 29
  • 31. Centrally located roof level plant space providing fresh air intake, supply and heat recovery Openable windows provide additional High level mechanical seasonal fresh air intake extract ventilation Typical perimeter radiator heating Typical perimeter Central high level extract Fresh air supply through floor radiator heating to roof plant space grilles from raised floor plenum Natural ventilation enters reception/circulation space through main entrance doorway and is extracted into plant space at high level Openable windows facilitates single sided ventilation for perimeter offices Natural Ventilation of Perimeter Offices and Reception 30
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  • 33. The building structure is based on a 6m by 7.5m grid of reinforced concrete with flat slab floors. This maximises floor-to- ceiling height and gives a large, open working space with only minimal visual barriers. The unbroken run of the concrete soffits also aids airflow throughout the building, contributing to the natural ventilation scheme and meeting the client’s request for a bright, healthy workspace. Upon completion, the BREEAM assessment resulted in a ‘very good’ rating, confirming that the design had successfully delivered the sustainable and low energy building requested by the client. This project was an excellent demonstration of Buro Happold’s ability to give a holistic view of a design to meet the client’s needs. With structural and building services teams working closely together, and backed up by the practice’s CoSA and fire engineering groups, the Glasgow office delivered a stylish and functional low energy office building, at very little additional cost. A post Occupation Evaluation (POE) has been undertaken to monitor user satisfaction, energy consumption and comfort. The study has assisted in the fine tuning of the building and assisted to further reduce energy consumption. The building has been rated BREEAM Very Good. 32
  • 34. Client: East Renfrewshire Council Architect: Reiach and Hall Disciplines: Building services engineering, structural engineering, ground engineering, fire engineering and risk assessment (FEDRA), computational simulation and analysis (CoSA), BREEAM consultant (SAT) Scottish Design Awards 2004 Best Regeneration Project – Commendation 33
  • 35. Urquhart Castle Visitor’s Centre Near Inverness, UK Completion: 2002 This new visitor centre at Urquhart Castle, one of Scotland’s largest castles and most popular tourist attractions, was designed to have minimal impact on its immediate environment; the beautiful banks of the Loch Ness. Minimising its broader environmental impact was a key part of the brief for Buro Happold, which provided the building services engineering design. The solution includes a natural ventilation system that works in tandem with underfloor heating to provide highly efficient heating. Daylighting panels were installed in the open areas to maximise the use of natural light, while energy-efficient lamps have been installed throughout. 34
  • 36. Client: Historic Scotland Architect: LDN Architects Disciplines: Building services engineering, computational simulation and analysis (CoSA) Value: £4m Gold Green Tourism Business Scheme GTBS Award – Winner Saltire Society Awards 2002 – Commendation 35
  • 37. Pitlochry Festival Theatre Pitlochry, UK Completion: 2002 The Pitlochry Festival Theatre project to upgrade the venue from a setting for famous summer gatherings, to all year round opening, saw the creation of a new restaurant and much improved auditorium. The restaurant incorporates a structural steel frame, exposed precast slabs, full height glazed facades and controlled natural ventilation, providing comfortable year-round dining facilities overlooking the picturesque theatre grounds and River Tummel. Extensive work took place to overcome the difficulty of building an extension at a riverside location, while improvements to the auditorium and foyer ensure the whole theatre has a contemporary, comfortable atmosphere. 36
  • 38. Client: Pitlochry Festival Theatre Architect: LDN Architects Disciplines: Building services engineering, structural engineering, computational simulation and analysis (CoSA) Value: £2m 37
  • 39. Royal Lyceum Theatre Edinburgh, UK Completion: 1996 The Royal Lyceum Theatre in Edinburgh city centre was relatively unchanged since construction in 1883, until Buro Happold was commissioned to upgrade the internal conditions. A fast-track design process was developed for an upgrade to the environmental conditioning systems, as internal comfort levels were seen as a major problem at the theatre. The auditorium was remodelled and a new air supply delivery system introduced, backed up by Victorian-style radiators at stalls level and high-level radiant panels above the stage to provide additional warmth. This was combined with a new building energy management system and refurbishment of all hydraulic and air based systems to comply with modern design criteria. 38
  • 40. Client: Royal Lyceum Theatre Company Architect: LDN Architects Disciplines: Building services engineering, structural engineering Value: £2m 39
  • 41. Hopetoun House South Queensferry, UK Completion: 2004 Hopetoun House in South Queensferry is one of the finest stately homes in the UK. Buro Happold was commissioned in 1997 to undertake a full survey of all the building services requirements for the restoration of the building. Following the survey, a full feasibility and management plan for the restoration was written in order to apply for funding. Among the issues covered were improvements to the electrical system, installation of fire detection equipment and assessment of the risks due to asbestos onsite. The detailed improvement plan required great care and sympathy in order to maintain the 17th Century architecture, funding was awarded to upgrade the north wing and ballroom areas first. 40
  • 42. Client: Hopetoun House Preservation Trust Architect: Ian Begg Architects Disciplines: Building services engineering Value: £25m 41
  • 43. Eastgate Arts Centre Peebles, UK Completion: March 2004 The project to transform this disused church in Peebles into a multi-function art centre included an entire internal renovation. The design was developed to create a contemporary interior within an historic exterior, complete with an auditorium, stage and audience facilities and thereby delivering the new Eastgate Arts Centre. Key elements of the development were diversion of the existing utilities in order to create space for an outside café area, and improving energy efficiency through installation of new heating and passive cooling systems. One side of the building was removed and substituted with a completely new entrance displaying the theatre within – all of which took place with the main gothic facade remaining untouched. 42
  • 44. Client: Borders 1996 Company Limited Architects: Richard Murphy Architects Disciplines: Building services engineering, environmental engineering, computational simulation and analysis (CoSA) Value: £4m Scottish Enterprise Dynamic Place Awards 2005 – Commendation 43
  • 45. National Park Gateway Centre Loch Lomond Bay, UK Completion: 2001 The Gateway Centre on the banks of Loch Lomond is a key part of a sizeable but sensitive development of the bay. The centre contains exhibition and retail spaces as well as offices for the Park Authority, all in an attractive, single storey structure fronted by glass walls providing spectacular views of the Loch. Best practice in sustainability was used throughout the design, extending to the use of recycled construction materials as well as highly efficient building services. Ground and shore conditions on the site provided particular challenges for Buro Happold’s geotechnical and civil engineers but the project was delivered on time and in budget to an excellent build quality. 44
  • 46. Client: Loch Lomond Park Authority Architects: Bennetts Associates Disciplines: Structural engineering, ground engineering, civil engineering Value: £2m Civic Trust Award 2003 – Winner Dynamic Place Award 2003 – Winner 45
  • 47. Danish National Opera House Copenhagen, Denmark Completion: 2005 This state of the art opera house, which opened in January 2005 on an island in Copenhagen harbour, was a true test of Buro Happold’s multi-disciplinary skills. Structurally, the design, by renowned Danish architects tackled, with separate air handling units (AHUs) dedicated to Henning Larsens Architects, presented many challenges, not each area. This is vital for the orchestra pit which, with 110 least the striking 35m of cantilevered roof projecting above the musicians and their individual lamps, generates an intense heat foyer. This also plays a role in the buildings services by helping load which needs to be moderated to preserve the acoustic limit solar gain in the fully-glazed foyer. The building contains performance of instruments affected by excessive humidity. more than 1,000 rooms, including the main stage and auditorium, five adjacent stages, rehearsal spaces for opera The stage AHU introduces a relatively small amount of cool and ballet as well as offices, catering and service spaces. air to the lowest 2m of the 25m-high space, effectively The build process, which took less than three years, made reducing the considerable temperature gains that occur great use of pre-cast concrete panels with high quality finishes. during performances. Air cooled by concrete mass plays a key role in maintaining Cooling for the building’s services comes from the harbour a comfortable environment for the audience in the main water, via a system set up to be used in two ways, depending auditorium. This is the key space in the building and on weather conditions. Water is either sent through a heat performances within it will provide most visitors with their exchanger connected directly to the cooling system in cold major, lasting experience – hence the extremely close weather when the harbour is around 7°C, or it is used to draw attention paid to audience comfort. waste heat from the condensers directly, so avoiding any efficiency drop caused by a heat exchanger. Fresh air is pumped into a plenum beneath the auditorium seating, having been pre-cooled on its route through the But the real test of this building has been in the quality of its concrete structure, before being discharged through floor- performances in the main auditorium, described by its musical mounted grilles on each of the 1,400 seats. Environmental director as ‘world class’. Proof that some well considered conditions on the stage and in the orchestra pit were also multi-disciplinary thinking can hit all the right notes! 46
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  • 50. Foyer and Auditorium – Summer Environmental Strategy Prevailing wind assists removal Motorised rooflight openings Fresh air is cooled to offset solar Fly-tower heavily Summer sun of hot air from foyer open to promote the removal and occupancy heat gains and insulated to reduce of air from the foyer using the enters space through air plenums solar heat gain natural stack effect principle under seated areas using displacement ventilation principle Air returns via the rear of each Summer sun balcony and at ceiling level above Fresh air enters foyer naturally External shading provided to Fresh air is provided to cloakroom Fresh air enters space at high level to cool and ventilate the space reduce direct solar heat gain area using wall mounted via moveable nozzles with extract using the natural stack effect displacement ventilation removed at high level through ceiling principle via motorised window openings Exhaust air is removed at high level Foyer and Auditorium – Winter Environmental Strategy Low temperature hot water Finned tube convector at high Finned tube convector located Fresh air is heated and enters Fly-tower heavily insulated to reduce trench convector at low level level to reduce fabric heat along edges of roof lights to space through air plenums under heat loss and minimise the generation to offset fabric heat loss loss and prevent down drafts prevent down draughts seated areas using displacement- of down draughts ventilation principle Winter sun Winter sun Fresh air provided via tickle Tempered fresh air enters space Underfloor heating provided in High-level outlets to provide Fresh air enters space at high level Air returns via the rear of each ventilators in facade using floor void and displacement ground floor foyer and cloakroom ventilation to upper foyer areas via moveable nozzles with extract balcony and at ceiling level above ventilation principle removed at high level through ceiling 49
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  • 52. Client: A.P.Møller and Chastine Mc-Kinney Møller Foundation Architect: Henning Larsen Architects Disciplines: Building services engineering, structural engineering, fire engineering design and risk assessment (FEDRA), computational simulation and analysis (CoSA) Value: £150m BSJ Building Services International Consultant of the Year 2005 – Commendation United States Institute of Theater Technology Merit Award – 2005 Award of Merit, International Illumination Design Awards 2007– Winner 51
  • 53. Anchor Mills Paisley, UK Completion: 2005 Known as the Domestic Finishing Mill, this complex project saw the full restoration of Anchor Mills, a disused textiles finishing mill in Paisley, Scotland. The Category A listed Mill was built around 1886. Although it remained intact, it had suffered as a result of a variety of rather crude alterations over the course of time and was identified in 1995 as being in a serious state of disrepair. Evident and rapid deterioration resulting from years of neglect, vandalism, theft, water ingress and fire damage meant that the structure was considered to be seriously at risk. There had never been a greater opportunity to turn this massive example of inner city blight and decay into a wonderful regeneration and building conservation proposal for the centre of Paisley than was promoted by the collective and concentrated efforts of the Phoenix Trust. Buro Happold’s approach to the restoration work ensured minimum intervention to the historic fabric of the building and used traditional construction methods where possible. Extensive testing of the building structure found that, after some minimal repairs, it was suitable for use without major strengthening works. The result is a building sympathetic to its original design, but now incorporating a large atrium, naturally ventilated car park, small business units and quality apartments. 52
  • 54. Client: Phoenix Trust/Persimmon Homes Architect: James F Stephen Architects Disciplines: Structural engineering, building services engineering, fire engineering design and risk assessment (FEDRA), computational simulation and analysis (CoSA) Value: £16m Scottish Design Awards 2007 Structural Design Award – Commendation Saltire Awards 2006 – Commendation Royal Institute of Chartered Surveyors Awards – Highly Commended Scottish Awards for Quality in Planning 2005 Development on the Ground Award Fire Safety Engineering Award 2004 – Winner GIA Design Award 2006 – Winner 53
  • 55. The Galeri Caernarfon Caernarfon, UK Completion: 2005 Known as the Galeri to its many users, the Creative Enterprise Centre in Caernarfon is a unique multi-purpose building. Incorporating a 400-seat auditorium for cinema or theatre, an exhibition area, recording studios, conference and even wedding facilities in one four storey structure, the Galeri is also in an exceptional location – the Menai Straits and views of Anglesey in front, and Snowdonia behind it is surrounded by some of the best countryside in north Wales. It is a building intended to be used all day long, hosting a performances on stage, the auditorium has retractable range of performances and exhibitions, from the traditional seating which means all types and sizes of shows can be to the avant-garde, throughout its many facilities. All of which held in front of a standing audience, if required. ensures the Galeri is buzzing for much of the night too. Yet, partly thanks to its stunning location, it also manages This results in a highly changeable heat load, met by a to attract corporate business, providing excellent conference responsive comfort system using displacement ventilation to facilities for firms looking to meet up away from the office. control the temperature of the space. All the necessary air handling units on the exterior of the building have been Buro Happold designed the building services for this award- specified with enhanced corrosion protection, due to the winning venue, working with Richard Murphy Architects. harsh coastal environment. 3 Versatility is key to the services strategy, which in the case of the main auditorium, means the ability to adapt to a wide range of uses and floor layouts. As well as straightforward 54
  • 56. 55
  • 57. Other rooms present equally challenging demands, including the Art Space gallery, small rehearsal rooms and offices, a shop, café bar and a restaurant. As well as ventilating these spaces, many – the main auditorium and recording studios included – have to be acoustically insulated so no background noise disrupts performances or recordings. In the many smaller rooms on the building perimeter, natural ventilation is used to provide fresh air to these spaces. As well as being a success in its own right, Galeri has helped boost development of the arts and creative industries in the region and initiated the quayside redevelopment programme currently underway in Caernarfon. Quite an achievement for a small theatre, but testament to how good buildings can help change communities for the better. 56
  • 58. 57
  • 59. Environmental Strategy High level exhaust from Main exhaust air removed plant space louvres High level motorised window Fresh air is fed down central at high level through actuators allow natural ventilation risers from plant space and is acoustically lined baffle by controlling intake/expell of air ducted into below seat plenums Fresh air inlet to roof level plant space for ducted Central high level extract Fresh air inlet to distribution to studios below within each studio roof level plant space Supply Supply Extract Studio 1 and Studio 2 Central Foyer Area Main Auditorium Central circulation space naturally vented and open to high level walkway between All perimeter office space to utilise Central distribution riser carries Fresh air is cooled to offset solar and roof plant areas single sided ventilation by use of supply and extract to each studio occupancy heat gains and enters space openable windows Fresh air enters foyer naturally to cool through air plenums under seated areas and ventilate space using the natural using displacement ventilation principles Perimeter offices and conference stack effect principle facilities sit in front of studio space as shown above 58
  • 60. Client: CEC Caernarfon Architect: Richard Murphy Architects High level exhaust from Disciplines: Building services plant space engineering, fire engineering design and risk assessment (FEDRA), computational simulation and analysis (CoSA) Value: £8m RIBA Award 2005 – Winner Roses Award Best Public Building Bronze Award 2006 – Winner Scottish Design Awards 2006 Architecture Grand Prix – Winner Scottish Design Awards 2006 Best Building for Public Use – Winner Air returns at the rear of each balcony and at ceiling level 59
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  • 63. Robin House, Balloch Children’s Hospice Balloch, UK Completion: 2005 Some buildings just have to deliver more than simply four walls and a roof. The Robin House children’s hospice in Balloch, near Loch Lomond, is one such project. Every aspect of the Robin House design is special and the Buro Happold team – providing civil, structural and geotechnical engineering as well as building services design – rose to the challenge to create a graceful yet sensitive building, which opened in 2005. Robin House is a hospice for terminally ill children, providing Consequently, most of the building is single storey with a accommodation for youngsters and their parents as well as timber facade, but running above the main entrance area is meeting and seminar rooms, catering and administration an undulating roof structure, also known as the ribbon roof. facilities built around a large, central play area. The hospice This organic wave-form adds a degree of playfulness while has to be a place where families can relax, with expert care replicating the outline of the surrounding trees and rolling on hand, to help children make the most of each day – countryside. It is made up of four long, curved roof plates hence the emphasis on making the building a fun place to be. which are aligned so each profile overlaps its neighbour, creating glazed eyelets between plates that allow natural The client, the Children’s Hospice Association Scotland light into the space below. 3 (CHAS), chose a six acre greenfield site for Robin House, a beautiful unspoilt location within the boundaries of a National Park. As such, careful consideration had to be paid to the design and construction process in relation to the site’s surroundings. 62
  • 64. 63
  • 65. Each ribbon of ‘wavy roof’ formed in timber Play ‘cones’ help to support glazed supported on pairs of curved steel beams roof to courtyard space Main plant room Natural ventilation Higher levels of insulation reduces to bedrooms heating energy consumption Sustainable materials considered where possible Mechanical ventilation only to hydrotherapy pool, kitchen, bathrooms, seminar room and ‘land-locked’ areas. Natural ventilation elsewhere ‘Mechanically assisted’ natural ventilation to Natural ventilation deeper plan spaces to bedrooms Overhanging eaves reduce Natural ventilation summer overheating on south to bedrooms facing rooms Bespoke ‘pool benches’ on glazed perimeter supply air to pool hall Roof to pool hall formed from laminated veneered lumber using monocoque construction spanning 12 metres 64
  • 66. Environmental section through bedrooms Mechanical extract ventilation from Overhanging eaves Good daylighting in toilets and bathrooms. Make-up air to reduce solar corridors via rooflights, via transfer grilles from corridors gains in summer reducing energy consumption Corridor Hydrotherapy plant room Natural ventilation to bedrooms Bedroom Trench heating Underfloor heating LST radiators Toilet/bathroom in bedrooms in corridors in bathrooms Environmental section through play space Structure of cone utilised to house extract ventilation from cones. Make-up air from play space Glazed roof to play space utilises solar tint/reflective coating to avoid summer over heating, roof structure also provides some shading Mechanical supply to play space. Extract via corridors and bathrooms Frosted windows allow daylight Underfloor heating from play space into bathrooms in play space ‘Gull wing’ column supports roof 65
  • 67. Client: Children’s Hospice Association of Scotland Architect: Gareth Hoskins Architects Disciplines: Building services engineering, structural engineering, ground engineering, fire engineering design and risk assessment (FEDRA), computational simulation and analysis (CoSA) Value: £8m The Civic Trust Awards 2007 Health and Wellbeing Award – Winner GIA Design Award 2006 – Winner 66
  • 68. CHAS also asked for an energy efficient building with low maintenance requirements and so natural ventilation has been adopted where possible. Underfloor heating was installed in many of the large areas, including the central play and dining areas, creating a warm environment without the intrusive, bulky radiators. This is backed up by solar shading created by overhanging eaves introduced to the many parts of the building that have full-height glazing. Although a complex and challenging project to work on, Buro Happold’s multi-disciplinary team worked together to overcome problems with proactive solutions. The end result is an elegant, naturally ventilated building which blends in sensitively with its surroundings and provides a bright and inspirational home from home for its residents. 67
  • 69. Glenturret Distillery Centre Crieff, UK Completion: 2002 Glenturret Distillery is the most visited distillery in Scotland, and is renowned for its Famous Grouse whisky. Buro Happold provided multi-disciplinary services to create the House of Grouse Visitor Centre, which houses the Famous Grouse experience. It features heritage collections, exhibition spaces, audio visual works, a tasting bar and a programmed tour around the working distillery. The project involved refurbishment of the distillery manager’s house, to make the Pavilion, and design of a new structure to connect this to the distillery. The Pavilion utilises a natural ventilation strategy for cooling while all its heating systems were designed to have minimum impact on the space. The visitor centre was completed from initial concept to full commission in a twenty month period, during which full whisky production was maintained. The project features one of the most complex multi media interactive shows in Europe and received a BAFTA award in the multi media cinemagraphic category. The resulting transformation allows visitors to learn about Glenturret’s long history in a modern, comfortable setting within Scotland’s oldest distillery. 68
  • 70. Client: Highland Distillers Architect: Land Design Studio Disciplines: Building services engineering, structural engineering, ground engineering Value: £2.5m BAFTA award in the multi media cinemagraphic category – Winner Marketing Brand Design Awards 2003, Best Brand Experience – Winner Visit Scotland 5 star rating – Winner 69
  • 71. New Scottish Parliament Edinburgh, UK Completion: 2005 Constructed from a mixture of steel, oak and granite, the complex Scottish Parliament Building has been hailed as one of the most innovative designs in the UK. Buro Happold provided inclusive design advice to ensure that a fully accessible building, in keeping with the design concept, was achieved. The philosophy of inclusion was central to the project design, with great importance attached not just to adhering to regulations, but to developing a building and culture that catered for the individual needs of all the people who would use it. The Scottish Parliament Building won the prestigious Stirling Prize for architecture in 2005. 70
  • 72. Client: Scottish Executive Architect: Enric Miralles Benedetta Tagliabue/RMJM Discipline: Inclusive design Stirling Prize 2005 – Winner Scottish Design Awards 2005 Architecture Grand Prix – Winner Scottish Design Awards 2005 Best Publicly Funded Building – Winner 71
  • 73. Glasgow Audi Braehead, UK Completion: 2004 When your client proudly uses the phrase ‘innovation through technology’ as its marketing slogan, you can be sure that it won’t settle for second best in the design of its latest showroom. Indeed, when architects SDA were approached by car manufacturer, Audi, they were given the task of creating ‘a statement site for the brand’, culminating in the world’s largest Audi centre, when it opened in 2004. The building is not just about selling cars, although it does and glass specifications required a great deal of analysis host a large showroom, it also houses: a museum, café with by Buro Happold’s CoSA team and its fire engineers. children’s play area, an art gallery, the 160-seater conference and events centre and a 23-bay service and repair shop. The thermal, acoustic and solar performance of the glass The centre is intended to be a modern way for people to chosen was all analysed using sophisticated software to enjoy buying a car, while reflecting Audi’s heritage of being investigate comfort, visual appeal, the resulting energy at the forefront of technology. consumption and how to keep it all condensation-free. The virtual model took into account all heat gains and losses as Consequently, Buro Happold’s design work, which covered well as internal air movement, including the impact of the structural, building services and fire engineering as well as office space on the first and second floors. computational simulation and analysis by the CoSA team, led to a structure that goes far beyond the norm for showrooms. The building structure is based around a steel frame with the main facade curtain being supported by cast aluminium arms Perhaps the most eye-catching aspect of the building is its projecting from the main elliptical supporting columns. 3 1,000m2 south west-facing glass facade. As well as being a spectacular statement in itself, specifying the facade design 72
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  • 75. Summer Environmental Strategy Cooling in office areas via displacement ventilation and ceiling swirl outlets High level ventilation extract Cooling achieved via chilled water system served from air cooled chiller in plant well Natural ventilation in Solar properties of workshop via up and glazing reduce solar over doors gains in summer Cooling in showroom via linear whirl outlets. Occupied space only conditioned to reduce energy consumption Winter Environmental Strategy Due to high infiltration rates in workshop, radiant Heating to office area heating system adopted to reduce heating costs via perimeter radiators and energy consumption Radiant heating in workshop via gas fired radiant tube heaters Extract ventilation Trench heating to Showroom full height glazed facades to offset High air change rate in downdraughts workshop via regular opening of up and over doors Fresh air to showroom Fresh air to office areas via via linear whirl outlets displacement and ceiling swirl outlets 74
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  • 77. Lighting was another challenge for the building services engineers, particularly in the showroom and events centre where the ceiling height is around 10m. Using standard high bay lighting was seen as too conventional for Audi so a row of twin-lamp uplighters suspended unobtrusively across the length of the ceiling was selected. This is supplemented by metal halide spotlights on the balconies, to pick out individual cars in the showroom. The end result is a prestigious and unique structure for Audi, a new landmark for the local area and a showcase of the very best thinking in building design. Vorsprung durch technik, indeed! 76
  • 78. Client: Audi UK Architect: SDA Architects Disciplines: Building services engineering, structural engineering, ground engineering, fire engineering design and risk assessment (FEDRA), computational simulation and analysis (CoSA) Value: £7m 77
  • 79. Perth Concert Hall Perth, UK Completion: 2006 Perth’s new concert hall, which opened in 2006, is a fine example of how a versatile, well designed building can help transform a city, making a significant contribution to its regeneration. As well as providing world class concert facilities in the The main structure of the hall is based around the auditorium evening, the contemporary concert hall can be transformed box, made up of 300mm thick concrete walls, poured in into a conference venue by day, acting as a focal point for situ. This provides primary stability for the whole building and wider efforts to develop the cultural and business activities the expanse of exposed concrete (except where it has been in the Perth and Kinross region. acoustically lined within the auditorium) plays a part in the building services strategy, by reducing extremes The hall is in the historic centre of the city, on a former of temperature. industrial site. Its design, by architects Building Design Partnership, is egg-shaped in plan, containing a 1,200-seat Audience comfort and minimal noise levels during concert hall at its heart, alongside a smaller room for recitals performances was another key concern for the client, or meetings and the full complement of front- and back-of- who also stipulated a low energy design for the building house facilities. Clever use of retractable seating and services. The resulting strategy won the Chartered Institution moveable staging allows the main auditorium to have many of Building Services Engineers (CIBSE) Project of the Year identities, from flat floor to a theatre in the round by Award in 2007. 3 transforming its layout. 78
  • 80. 79
  • 81. Extensive computational fluid dynamics modelling was used to analyse various ventilation concepts for the foyer and auditorium. This led to a strategy combining natural ventilation in the foyer, developed in conjunction with the architecture to include facade shading, and displacement ventilation within the auditorium. Use of the latter is reduced thanks to the thermal mass of the exposed structure – a unique feature for an auditorium – which helps keep the building cooler for longer in summer. As well as creating a striking new landmark for Perth, the concert hall is delivering significant energy savings. Initial monitoring shows that annual energy use is less than 200kWh/m2, a figure well below industry standard, helped particularly by the use of natural ventilation. While onstage events may provide artistic inspiration, the auditorium itself is an inspiration in its own right providing an inspiration of its own – proving that sustainable design can be built into buildings of all sizes and functions. 80
  • 82. Foyer and Auditorium Summer Environmental Strategy Fresh air is cooled to offset solar and occupancy heat High and low level motorised Air returns via the rear of gains and enters the Summer sun window louvres open to promote the stage at high level auditorium through the removal of air from the foyer a series of nozzle and provide natural ventilation diffusers integrated and free-cooling with the lighting gantries at high level Fresh air is cooled and enters Fresh air is cooled to offset solar and Prevailing wind the multi-purpose room via occupancy heat gains and enters the assists removal of active chilled beams integrated auditorium through air plenums under hot air from foyer within the ceiling seated areas using the displacement ventilation principle 81
  • 83. Client: Perth and Kinross Council Architect: Building Design Partnership Disciplines: Building services engineering, structural engineering, ground engineering, fire engineering design and risk assessment (FEDRA), computational simulation and analysis (CoSA) Value: £15m BSJ Building Services Project of the Year – Winner RIAS Andrew Doolan Award for Architecture 2006 – Shortlisted British Construction Industry Awards 2006 – Regeneration Award Winner Dynamic Place Awards 2006 – Commendation Scottish Design Awards 2006 Best Building for Public Use – Commendation The Dundee Institute of Architects Award – Winner Civic Trust Awards 2006 – Winner The Guild of Architectural Ironmongers/ RIBA Awards 82
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  • 85. THGL Studios London, UK Completion: 2004 Based on the site of an 18th Century hospital in Covent Garden, THGL Studios has evolved into London’s pre-eminent centre for creative and media communities. The Studios houses state of the art video and recording studios, inspirational restaurants as well as bars and office space in a former hospital at the heart of London’s Covent Garden. The project to renovate the building saw the installation of up to the minute equipment to create the very best film, video and sound recording studio facilities, while maintaining the original facade. The resilience of the mechanical and electrical systems was a vital requirement for the project and enabled the design to develop around these critical supplies. The main plant room, installed at roof level, was pre-fabricated off-site enabling the main systems to be assembled in a controlled environment resulting in excellent quality management. 84
  • 86. Client: THGL Architect: Allies and Morrison Disciplines: Building services engineering, computational simulation and analysis (CoSA) Value: £25m 85
  • 87. The Aqualibrium Centre Campbeltown, UK Completion: 2006 The Aqualibrium Centre – which contains a swimming pool and community facilities in a distinctive D-shaped building – is at the centre of a broader regeneration project for Campbeltown, Argyll and Bute. Alongside the 25m-long pool, with its associated changing facilities and spectator area, sits a library, fitness centre, crèche and café with roof terrace. Aqualibrium proves that good design isn’t the preserve of big The building structure up to the second floor level is made corporations or experimental universities and puts valuable from reinforced concrete, with 200mm walls also poured in community services into an award-winning, environmentally situ and left exposed internally to make use of its high levels of responsible building, accessible to all. thermal mass. The external surfaces have a layer of insulation covered by a rendered finish, while the exposed surfaces The main pool and the adjacent, smaller training pool are inside have a high quality, smooth finish. The excellent on the first floor with the library beneath. This presented the insulation provided by the concrete aids the building services challenge of coming up with a sufficiently strong structure, strategy, which uses a woodchip-fuelled biomass boiler as particularly given the varied quality of the ground at the site. the main provider of heat. As soil conditions were not sufficiently stable to build a ground bearing slab at ground level, a suspended slab was built, Moving up the building, a mix of steel and timber provides supported by beams that span the pile caps, driven 18m the rest of the structure, which is topped by a lightweight, below the surface. The pool itself is supported by concrete standing seam aluminium roof. 3 columns, poured in situ, above these pile caps. 86
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  • 89. Crisp detailing and clean lines achieved Glulam roof rafters meet steelwork with by integration of services in internal simple finger connection plate flange Detail A walls and soffits Biomass boiler provides heat for building from local sources 6 lane – 25 metre pool with movable floor above plant room Exposed concrete used to dramatic effect in foyer and throughout the building External mound partially formed from polystyrene moulds recycled after use Curved walls with large openings in concrete construction formed in in-situ concrete 88
  • 90. Client: Argyll and Bute Council Architect: Page and Park Architects Disciplines: Structural engineering, ground engineering, civil engineering Value: £8m Scottish Award for Quality in Planning 2006 Scottish Design Awards 2007 Northern Exposure – Winner Civic Trust Award 2007 89
  • 91. Detail A Glulam beam notched to facilitate Slice plate over column to All top connections to splice plate connection over column connect adjacent members be countersunk bolts Column head restraint Glulam timber beam to be Beam end connection to torsionally restrained at column specialist subcontractors support. Finger shims to be details inserted to pack gaps between beam face and column flange 6º taper 5º pitch Bearing plate to support timber Bracing to restrain column glulam beam notched to suit and ensure torsional restraint bearing detail to glulam beam Bracing member Section B 90
  • 92. The use of glued laminated timber sections across the width of the pool adds a natural feel to the space which spans 22m. The wood was pre-cambered to resist the effect of loading and laterally restrained to overcome compression due to wind uplift forces which, given the exposed nature of the site, were deemed to be significant. Design of the library also required a large column-free space and so spans of up to 13m are incorporated into the structure. These spans, which incorporate 750mm deep structural ribs, also provide support for the fitness centre and changing areas above. By putting design quality first, Aqualibrium illustrates that well considered buildings can, when made available to everyone, make a positive change to the local community. 91
  • 93. The Wright Business Centre Glasgow, UK Completion: 2005 This new two storey managed business centre operated by Greater Easterhouse Managed (GEM) Workspaces, has two floors of lettable office space incorporating communal and ancillary facilities including meeting rooms, a conference suite and a small café with seating. The building form is divided into three main components, a glazed block centred around a double height atrium, a brick and aluminium clad wing containing the majority of office accommodation, and a single storey conference block clad in vertical aluminium rainscreen panelling. The large rooflit atrium, looking onto the café space and through to a walled garden, has been designed to foster a new business community, and through the placement of core shared facilities encourage interaction amongst the different users. The environmental strategy provides natural ventilation throughout the flexible office spaces and uses the central atrium to provide excellent daylighting and stack exhaust ventilation.The offices have a shallow plan to maximise daylight and make best use of single sided natural ventilation. The steel frame supports a cantilever with the first floor overhanging the ground floor providing solar shading to the ground level. The building has been rated BREEAM Very Good. 92
  • 94. Client: Greater Easterhouse Managed Workspace Architect: Elder and Cannon Disciplines: Building services engineering, structural engineering, ground engineering, civil engineering, quantity surveying, fire engineering design and risk assessment (FEDRA), computational simulation and analysis (CoSA), acoustics Value: £4m Scottish Design Awards 2007 Best Commercial Project – Shortlisted GIA Design Award 2006 – Winner 93
  • 95. BAA Car Parks Glasgow and Edinburgh airports, UK Completion: 2002 and 2004 Buro Happold provided multi-disciplinary engineering services for a five-storey, 2,000-space car park at Glasgow airport in 2002. The design combines economical and functional use of materials and a reduced number of columns in each floor, creating a more open, welcoming and safe environment. This was achieved without having to install additional escape routes and stairwells thanks to extensive analysis of fire hazards and evacuation procedures. This showed that the design could safely incorporate a reduced ‘safe travel distance’ from the centre of the car park in the event of emergency. Thanks to the success of the Glasgow project, Buro Happold was employed to create a new car park based on the same model for Edinburgh airport. 94
  • 96. Client: British Airport Authority Architect: Reid Architects Disciplines: Structural engineering, building services engineering, traffic and transport engineering, fire engineering and risk assessment (FEDRA), inclusive design (IDS) Value: £30m total Safer Parking Award Park Mark™ 2005 – Winner UK Car Park of the Year 2005 – Winner Nominee European Parking Awards 2005 – Best Design Category 95
  • 97. Edinburgh’s Telford College Edinburgh, UK Completion: 2006 The new home for Telford College in Edinburgh, which opened in 2006, is a building worthy of the great Scottish civil engineer after whom it is named. Using the very latest materials and building design thinking, this £50 million project combines the best possible educational facilities with some innovative energy-saving features. The 29,000m2 building incorporates four previous campus temperatures, and extensive use of natural daylight help sites into one on a brownfield development as part of the reduce energy consumption. regeneration scheme for Edinburgh’s Granton area, on the outskirts of the city. The latter part of this strategy provides a feature for the main entrance area, which is topped by a light and impressive The Buro Happold engineering team was tasked with curved ETFE foil roof. This is supported by timber arches providing state of the art learning facilities for up to 21,000 which, as well as having a very low embodied energy to students and 600 staff, all engaged in a wide range of topics; help reduce the building’s carbon footprint, add a stylish from computing to hairdressing to plumbing. and natural feature to the space. Public and circulation areas have to be first class too, in Coming up with an effective fire safety strategy was another terms of offering clear paths around the building as well as key task for the Buro Happold team. Great use of smoke providing opportunities for comfortable, collaborative study modelling using computational fluid dynamics software and and socialising. simulations of evacuation behaviour demonstrated that various architectural features (including having atria in four locations, The client requested the site has a low environmental impact use of open balconies and the central link bridge) would and so natural ventilation, backed up by large amounts of permit quick exit in the event of a fire. 3 exposed structural concrete to help reduce swings in 96
  • 98. 97
  • 99. Saw tooth roof lights to maximise Link bridge – high level trusses Glulam timber arches supporting ETFE foil cushion roof with variable Learning resource centre with daylight to studio spaces support three levels of walkways secondary tubular steel frame translucency to control solar gain exposed concrete frame – flat slabs by suspension system and circular precast columns Four story high ‘wind posts’ with Hybrid precast / insitu concrete teaching pinned details top and bottom blocks with exposed ribbed slabs 98
  • 100. 99
  • 101. Client: Telford College Architect: HOK Disciplines: Structural engineering, ground engineering, civil engineering, traffic engineering, fire engineering design and risk assessment (FEDRA) Value: £50m 100
  • 102. Each atrium has a natural smoke and heat exhaust ventilation system that ensures conditions inside remain tenable by directing smoke outside, thus keeping air quality and visibility tolerable for long enough to evacuate the building. Traffic planning and modelling were also carried out by Buro Happold engineers, in close collaboration with the architect HOK, to develop an appropriate transport model around which facilities were then designed. The end result of the biggest publicly- funded further education college to be built in the UK since the 1970s is a primarily naturally lit and ventilated, friendly and functional building, providing an exemplary new home for Telford College. 101
  • 103. Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh Edinburgh, UK Completion: ongoing Creating a new visitor centre for the Botanic Garden in Edinburgh has involved designing a building that works as an entrance as well as an exhibition and educational space for the beautiful gardens. Timber will be used extensively within the building, creating a natural feel to a contemporary building which helps it blend in with its organic surroundings. Use of timber will drastically reduce the embodied energy of the building and the carbon dioxide created during construction. Sustainability is a key feature of the design and great care is being taken in choice of materials to ensure long life and an efficient structure while reducing its environmental impact. 102
  • 104. Client: Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh Architect: Edward Cullinan Architects Disciplines: Structural engineering, ground engineering, civil engineering, planning supervision Value: £10m 103
  • 105. Alsion Campus at Syddansk University Sonderborg, Denmark Completion: 2006 Following the completion of work on the Danish National Opera House, Buro Happold were part of the winning team in the international design competition for the new Campus at Syddansk University. Engineers working on this project to create a new suite of terms of heat gain and flexibility of the internal environment. facilities for the University of Southern Denmark, were set an Fire engineers made up the final part of the Buro Happold unenviable task: to beat the energy consumption targets in team, ensuring the safety of the building’s many large open Danish Building Regulations by 30%. spaces within the building. As well as meeting this challenging demand, there was an In line with the architectural intentions and the low energy equal imperative to deliver quality. The aim of the £30 million aspirations, the building structure is mainly concrete, which project was to relocate the university’s base to Sonderborg in is exposed wherever possible to act as a thermal buffer. south-western Denmark, where it now acts as the focal point for the university’s six sites. Consequently, it contains a striking The teaching blocks in the building include large cantilevers, state of the art concert hall as well as a science park, taking of up to 12m. A combination of steel and concrete acts as up around half the floor space of the 20,000m2 development. a permanent formwork, supporting the cantilever while preserving the open structure of the end walls, allowing great As the Buro Happold team was providing building services views out and excellent day lighting. The main columns of and structural engineering design, it was ideally placed to the steel frame are 500mm by 500mm steel boxes filled with meet these challenges. The design also required great use concrete, while the 300mm-thick concrete floors transfer of glazing, so Buro Happold’s specialist facade and acoustic horizontal forces back to the central cores of the building. 3 teams were brought in to maintain an effective building in 104
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  • 108. Auditorium – Summer Environmental Strategy Heavily insulated Extract grilles Summer sun building to minimise located in ceiling Extract ducts return Air ducted under balconies solar heat gain air to plantroom Cooled fresh air supplied to stage area from low level diffusers Fresh air is cooled to offset heat gains and Main supply duct enters space through air plenums using the displacement ventilation principle Auditorium – Winter Environmental Strategy Extract ducts return air to plantroom where heat is recovered Winter sun Heated fresh air supplied to stage area from low level diffusers Convector heaters along Fresh air is heated and enters space foyer facade to offset through air plenums using the heat loss and to prevent displacement ventilation principle down draughts 107
  • 109. Client: Syddansk University Disciplines: Building services engineering, structural engineering, fire engineering and risk assessment (FEDRA) computational simulation and analysis (CoSA), acoustics Value: £35m International Design Competition 2003 – Winner RIBA European Awards 2007 – Winner 108
  • 110. The heating and cooling strategy of the building works around natural ventilation, following Buro Happold’s computer analysis of the internal environment. As well as the temperature-damping effect of the exposed concrete and solar shading on the glass walls, chilled beams will control temperatures inside the building. Automatic windows are opened at night to facilitate night cooling, so reducing energy usage to cool the structure. Thanks to the close co-operation between all these teams and their strong project leadership, the building design has met all its targets and now provides an exemplary working building for the university. 109
  • 111. Clydebank Re-built Clydebank, UK Overview Clydebank Re-built is an Urban Regeneration Company (URC); an organisation dedicated to developing the area – its economy, environment, buildings and society. It has been designated a pathfinder regeneration company by the Scottish Government, one of only five in Scotland. Clydebank Re-built’s aim is to position Clydebank as a creative, distinctive and successful regional centre within the Glasgow Metropolitan area and improve the quality of the built environment to make Clydebank an attractive, secure and welcoming place. These values are very consistent with Buro Happold’s approach to design. Clydebank Leisure Centre The pool access is at first floor level, to create an undercroft Completion: ongoing for the pool. This will enable easy access for future inspection and any maintenance required to the pool structure. The space The Clydebank Leisure Centre forms part of the Clydebank under the pool can be increased in height to create a plant Re-built urban regeneration project on the banks of the room containing all the pool-related plant equipment. The River Clyde at Queen’s Quay, and will replace the current sports hall is accessed at ground floor level. Playdrome Leisure Centre. The development comprises a 1.8m deep, 25m swimming pool, a 1m deep learner pool The building has been designed to provide an energy-efficient and a leisure pool complete with flume and wave machine. solution, using the natural form of the building to provide good Dry sports facilities includes a fitness centre, a six-court environmental protection for the various zones, together with sports hall, a 20m climbing wall and associated changing energy-efficient systems to meet the base load demands and circulation areas. within the building. 3 110
  • 112. Clydebank Leisure Centre Client: Clydebank Re-Built Architect: Kennedy Fitzgerald & Associates Disciplines: Building services engineering, structural engineering, ground engineering, fire engineering and risk assessment (FEDRA), computational simulation and analysis (CoSA), specialist lighting design (LiT) Value: £15m 111
  • 113. Clydebank Canopy Architect: RMJM Architects Disciplines: Bridge and structural engineering, specialist lighting design (LiT), engineering services Value: £250,000 Clydebank Canopy Completion: ongoing Clydebank is a natural wildlife haven. The river, canal and mudflat areas downstream are well-known bird habitats, attracting a wide range of domestic and foreign species. The canopy is an opportunity to announce this aspect of this area to locals as well as to strangers. To this end, the canopy is designed to mirror a swan in flight taking off from the canal, as two long cantilevering wings span out from a central supporting body structure, creating an evocative and delicate covering to the bridge. The canopy is designed to allow full operation of the original bridge, and to minimise the obstruction to pedestrians during its construction. The full steel and tensile wire structure can be installed in one piece from the back of a lorry using a crane, and lowered onto its new concrete pad foundations. The canopy shall be covered in a PTFE tensile fabric, and shall be brought to life at night using feature colour lighting to its underside. Its colour will change as the temperature changes throughout the year, in a form of animated weather announcement. 112
  • 114. Residential Project Architect: Elder and Cannon Architects Disciplines: Building services engineering, structural engineering, ground engineering, sustainability and alternative technologies (SAT) Value: £5m Cart Street Residential Project Completion: ongoing Cart Street Residential Project involves the creation of forty sustainable and low energy housing units, designed to provide accommodation for the Clydebank Housing Association. The project is a key site at the gateway to the strategic Queens Quay Masterplan. This prominent location lies at a focal point immediately opposite the new Clydebank College and Enterprise and Learning Centre, and will perform the critical role of connecting these new waterfront developments with the town’s existing built fabric. The development of the site is therefore of crucial importance in setting the standard on the riverside for design quality and confidence, as well as integrating the waterfront with the town. The project is being designed to meet the new Scottish Technical Standards Section 6, fulfilling demanding energy and carbon emission benchmarks. It will adopt best practice in the integrated engineering design philosophy. 113
  • 115. University of Edinburgh Projects Edinburgh, UK Overview Buro Happold’s collaboration with the University of Edinburgh started with a design competition win on the new Informatics School on the Potterrow site, as part of the Bennetts Associates and Reiach and Hall team. The winning entry focused on providing a sustainable and low energy design solution, meeting the client’s brief for a low carbon rated, flexible building that provided comfortable accommodation for the Informatics School and with BREEAM Excellent credentials. This relationship has been further galvanised by our work on the refurbishment of the Adam Ferguson Building, a challenging project to provide 21st century accommodation within a grade A listed building. More recently Buro Happold has been involved in the Centre for Regenerative Medicine on the Little France campus, where the opportunities allow the creation of a sustainable building in accordance with new Edinburgh City Council planning criteria, whilst providing a world class biosciences facility. 114
  • 116. 115
  • 117. Architect: Bennetts Associates and Reiach and Hall Disciplines: Structural engineering, building services engineering, fire engineering design and risk assessment (FEDRA), computational simulation and analysis (CoSA), specialist lighting design (LiT) Value: £60m (Phase 1 and Phase 2) 116
  • 118. New Informatics School cooling services for the entire campus as well as meeting its demand for electricity. This highly efficient technology uses the – Potterrow Development waste heat from the gas-fired engine, to drive a water heating Completion: 2008 system. While the electricity generation side produces Buro Happold engineers played many roles in this dramatic, 1.6MWe into the private mains supply, its by-product feeds yet functional inner city redevelopment. As well as delivering into the hot water system for all the campus buildings, with structural and building services engineering, a host of the back up from two boilers. practice’s specialist consulting services were brought in, including fire engineering and computational simulation and An absorption chiller unit is also in the new energy centre, analysis of the internal environment as well as the sustainability supplying cooling services via underground pipelines to two group acting as BREEAM assessor. other buildings as well as the Potterrow development. The £60m building forms a new home for the University of Another key aspect of the building’s design was the need to Edinburgh’s Informatics department, incorporating 12,000m2 allow further development, as and when funding becomes of accommodation and a basement car park. available; there is a flexibility to the structure that allows further construction projects to be simply added on. Sustainability was key; fitting in with the university’s environmental policy led to great use of recycled materials Thanks to the commitment of the Buro Happold engineers, the in the building and the integration of the structural fabric university has a structure that not only exemplifies best practice (in particular, its thermal mass) into the building services in terms of building form and function, and can also act as a firm strategy using moderating effect of the large amounts of foundation for future developments. By then, the class-leading, exposed concrete in the design. low energy engineering design implemented at Potterrow should have become the norm for all construction projects. But perhaps the biggest low energy measure is a combined heat and power (CHP) plant to provide both heating and The building has been rated BREEAM Excellent. 117
  • 119. Architect: LDN Architects Disciplines: Building services engineering, fire engineering design and risk assessment (FEDRA), computational simulation and analysis (CoSA) Value: £14m Adam Ferguson Building The brief for the redeveloped Adam Ferguson Building has Completion: ongoing two key elements that provide direction for the environmental engineering design, namely the desire to provide a The building is in the heart of the University of Edinburgh’s comfortable working environment while being environmentally campus and is surrounded on all sides by built up areas responsible and maintaining the existing structure and facade except for George Square itself. The refurbishment and of the building whilst improving the overall performance of the redevelopment of the existing building will include the building envelope. formation of a new upper and roof level accommodation and creation of a new lecture theatre at podium and The university participates in the UK Carbon Emissions basement level. The refurbished building will house the Trading Scheme, which has created an incentive to Management School and Economics Department, as well produce a building that makes maximum use of passive as lecture theatre space and computing areas. environmental conditioning methods. The university has also shown a commitment to achieving a ‘Very Good’ BREEAM The majority of the building will be devoted to office type rating on this project. accommodation, to suit the requirements of the university teaching staff. The building has been rated BREEAM Very Good. 118
  • 120. Architect: Sheppard Robson Disciplines: Building services engineering, structural engineering, ground engineering, fire engineering design and risk assessment (FEDRA), computational simulation and analysis (CoSA) Value: £50m Centre for Regenerative Medicine Social, administrative and very specialised lab support Completion: ongoing accommodation will also be incorporated into the building. The Centre for Regenerative Medicine will be a flagship The new facility will be one of the first buildings located on development for the University of Edinburgh, symbolising the campus for the Centre for Biomedical Research at the most advanced technologies now available in stem cell Little France, adjoining the Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh and research, development and manufacture. The building will University of Edinburgh medical school and research institute. be designed to the highest standard and quality using the principles of social, economic and environmental sustainability, which will allow the university to attract the most qualified and notable scientists in this field. The three main elements of the building will include a stem cell production or translation unit, research labs to accommodate approximately 150 researchers and an ‘incubator unit’, i.e. labs which can be let to companies starting up in this field. 119
  • 121. Royal Commonwealth Pool Edinburgh, UK Completion: ongoing This Grade A listed Royal Commonwealth pool in Edinburgh has twice played host to the Commonwealth Games – once in 1970 and again in 1986. It is now undergoing a £25m refurbishment and upgrade. The project involves replacing the three existing pool tanks with state of the art pools that meet the requirements of modern competitive swimming and diving. The client’s aspiration is to make it a centre for excellence in diving, in response to Scotland’s successes in the pool at the last Olympic Games. In addition, the client has a strong emphasis on environmental sustainability. Water is conserved by using water saving appliances. Waste water from the showers will be recycled and used for toilet flushing. Further greywater recycling is implemented by recycling filter backwash and returning it back into the circulating water. It is proposed that a 1000m2 solar roof will generate 458,000kWh saving 87,000kg/CO2 from entering the atmosphere. A woodchip biomass boiler will meet the thermal base load, avoiding PVC where possible and recommendations have been made that products containing formaldehyde be excluded. Energy monitoring meters in the foyer detailing water and energy savings will be provided. 120
  • 122. Architect: S & P Architects Disciplines: Building services engineering, structural engineering, ground engineering, fire engineering design and risk assessment (FEDRA), computational simulation and analysis (CoSA) Value: £30m 121
  • 123. Queens University Belfast Projects Belfast, Northern Ireland Overview Our appointment on the new library project, the largest single building project to have been procured on campus in recent times, has led to the development of a strong relationship with the client team at Queens University Belfast. The new library has created the opportunity to provide a sustainable, low energy design solution within a more conventional building envelope, with state of the art facilities for the users, that achieves excellent levels of daylighting and comfort in a safe and secure environment. The links with Queens University Belfast has continued with our work on the Mathematics building and the Guidance Centre refurbishment on campus. New Library The building is also home to the information services Completion: ongoing department and a computer server room, all delivered to a low energy brief –a significant challenge for Buro Happold’s Queen’s University Belfast’s new library will be a world building services team, backed up by colleagues in fire away from the original of 1845. Whilst book storage and engineering, lighting, IT and computer simulation and analysis. study are still central to the building, the Sir Anthony O’Reilly library will also meet essential needs for computer usage, Central to the building’s low energy philosophy is the use of electronic storage of data and group study rooms. There passive temperature control in open plan spaces, validated will be 2,000 study spaces, in a variety of formats, including by the work of the Computer Simulation and Analysis group individual desks with internet access as well as small which also carried out extensive thermal dynamic modelling to enclosures. It is much bigger than the current library and optimise glass and ventilation design. This ensured optimised has 1.5m books for its 24,000 students, previously one use of daylight, reduced heat loss and solar gain through million books catered for 6,000 students. careful selection of the glass used in windows and facades. 3 122
  • 124. 123
  • 125. New Library Architect: SBRA Architects/Robinson Patterson Partnership Disciplines: Building services engineering, fire engineering and risk assessment (FEDRA), computational simulation and analysis (CoSA), specialist lighting design (LiT) Value: £30m Environmental strategy is developed on the basis of mixed mode ventilation techniques, combing floor displacement systems and natural ventilation, completed with exposed concrete soffits 124
  • 126. Summer Ventilation Strategy Vents fully open in summer – extract plant does not operate air movement provided by stack effect Single sided ventilation for cellular office space Air intake for basement plant area Ground floor cellular spaces extracted mechanically into base of atrium Winter Ventilation Strategy Vents closed in winter. Main extract plant operates to remove heat from Roof mounted fans transfer stale, warm top of atrium and recover air into main atrium for heat recovery Extracted air discharged after heat has been recovered Trickle ventilation for cellular offices Air intake for basement plant area Ground floor cellular spaces extracted mechanically into base of atrium 125
  • 127. New Mathematics Building Architect: SBRA Architects/ Robinson Patterson Partnership Disciplines: Building services engineering, fire engineering and risk assessment (FEDRA), computational simulation and analysis (CoSA), specialist lighting design (LiT) Value: £5m Cooling has been generated through the use of innovative ground water bore holes, the first such installation of this size and scale in Northern Ireland. Conditions during peak occupancy are moderated by large areas of exposed concrete which help dampen big swings in temperature which, along with a night-cooling strategy, reduce the need for mechanical cooling. Close attention has been paid to the control strategy of the heating and cooling systems to incorporate heat recovery from the computer room as well as use of a Ground Source Heat Pump (GSHP). This low energy system exploits the relatively stable temperature of the soil a few metres underground to provide heating or, in reverse, cooling. New Mathematics Building Energy consumption is backed up by ensuring an airtight Completion: 2007 building construction to reduce heat loss or gain, as well as controlling lighting operation by presence detection, The new Mathematics Building forms an integral part of thus eliminating wastage through lights being left on in the Estates Masterplan, enhancing the wider campus and empty rooms. creating a physical environment capable of supporting learning and teaching for future generations. The result will be a mixed-mode building, with natural ventilation where possible, backed up by displacement The environmental engineering has enabled a low energy ventilation and cooling via the large expanses of concrete design to be developed and the adoption of passive beams in deep plan zones. This all helps this bold, yet ventilation and excellent daylighting has informed the massing, environmentally sensitive library provide the very best orientation and form. Exposed thermal mass enabled the facilities for education in the 21st century. indoor climate to be established during peak occupancy periods and a night cooling strategy has been incorporated The building has been rated BREEAM Very Good. within the building design. 126
  • 128. New Guidance Centre Completion: 2007 The new Guidance Centre at Queens University provides guidance facilities for students ranging from disability services through to finance. Buro Happold provided building services with the adoption of a mixed mode ventilation system that maximised the use of passive ventilation where practical and assisted mechanical ventilation where only required. New Guidance Centre Architect: Robinson Patterson Partnership Disciplines: Building services engineering, computational simulation and analysis (CoSA) Value: £3m 127
  • 129. The Calyx, Scotland’s National Garden Gateway Perth, UK Completion: ongoing Located at Cherrybank in Perth, The Calyx is intended to be a celebration of gardening and a national showcase for the best in modern horticulture. Features on the 25-hectare site include a rockery, terraced orchard and numerous themed gardens and water features, as well as the National Heather Collection. Glass and ETFE foil cushions will be used extensively in the main visitor centre to help merge the building with the outside space, providing views of the stunning surrounding gardens. The Calyx is intended to be the first carbon-neutral and low energy project of this scale in the UK and will source all its supplies from local producers. 128
  • 130. Client: The Cherrybank Trading Company Architect: Nicoll Russell Studio Disciplines: Building services engineering, structural engineering, fire engineering design and risk assessment (FEDRA), computational simulation and analysis (CoSA), sustainability and alternative technologies (SAT) Value: £30m 129
  • 131. Hazelwood School Glasgow, UK Completion: 2007 This school, in the Dumbreck area of Glasgow, provides a sympathetic, high- quality, enriching and inclusive learning environment for children with severe sensory impairments. The first of its kind in Europe, it allows each child to reach their full potential. The environmental design strategy allows the pupils to comfortably make use of their classroom facilities without noise or solar glare, and achieves a low energy solution. Natural ventilation provides fresh air and cooling via a system of opening vents integrated into the structure, allowing air into the occupied area, which exhausts at high level. Artificial lighting complements the good natural light provided by extensive north glazing. The teacher has complete control over the light sources, providing the flexibility required. Underfloor heating was chosen as it avoids protrusions on the wall surfaces and minimizes warm air loss, as well as the risk of germs spreading in radiator convection currents. The structural form needed to be modular to allow an economical design, whilst accommodating the architectural layout. A series of glulam timber frames radiate out from the setting-out points, with timber rafters between supporting the ceilings and roof. Buro Happold also worked with the architects to develop new internal streets with areas specifically designed to provide sensory and tactile cues to help children identify their immediate environment. The project has been rated at SEAM Excellent. 130
  • 132. Client: Glasgow City Council Architect: Gordon Murray and Alan Dunlop Architects Disciplines: Building services engineering, structural engineering, inclusive design, ground engineering, fire engineering design and risk assessment (FEDRA), computational analysis and simulation (CoSA), specialist lighting design (LiT) Value: £7m 131
  • 133. European Patent Office The Hague, The Netherlands Completion: ongoing When completed, the new competition winning European Patent Office building will be 16 storeys high, with 13 floors of office space housing three departments on each floor, all arranged around two big green canyons. The office floors house the very purpose of the project, new workspaces for around 1200 people. Much consideration has been given to designing optimal working space to maximise the productivity and quality of life for the EPO staff. Thermal comfort, daylight, air quality, operable windows and artificial light have been incorporated to improve health, productivity and employee satisfaction in the workplace. Workspaces will be individually monitored with individual room controls and operable windows in each office to allow everyone their personal choice of temperature and fresh air. The office floors are designed to balance functional efficiency, energy efficiency, and employee productivity with minimal maintenance requirements. 132
  • 134. Client: European Patent Office Architect: Henning Larsen Architects Disciplines: Building services engineering, structural engineering, ground engineering, fire engineering and risk assessment (FEDRA), computational analysis and simulation (CoSA) Value: £100m International Design Competition 2005 – Winner 133
  • 135. University of Strathclyde Projects Glasgow, UK Overview Buro Happold have worked with the University of Strathclyde for more than eight years. Recently selection as the multi-discipline engineers on the new Bioscience Building on Cathedral Street followed by the appointment to the new Sports and Health Sciences Buildings has enabled the relationship to develop at a strategic level and thus provide a more holistic approach to campus wide issues, such as energy and infrastructure. This collaboration is further strengthened by Buro Happold’s appointment to the consultant framework with Sheppard Robson. New Biosciences Building development in the Strathclyde University Masterplan, sets Completion: ongoing a benchmark for sustainability. The new Biosciences building will see the expansion of the It is generally recognised that in the 21st century the existing John Arbuthnott building to accommodate the newly biosciences are destined to undergo a dramatic transition created Strathclyde Institute for Pharmacy and Biomedical to a higher level of quantitative precision. The ultimate (and Sciences on a single site. This will allow the institute to operate still distant) goal is to understand living systems in terms as one, cohesive department. Currently the Biomedical of properties of their constituent molecules. Achieving this Sciences at Strathclyde comprises of five separate will require an emphasis on quantitative and integrative departments housed in three buildings across two campuses. approaches that draw on skills, expertise and instrumentation from a wide range of disciplines including the arts, physical The engineering challenge is to produce the high quality sciences, mathematics, engineering and computation. and flexible laboratory and ancillary spaces such a vision demands, while ensuring that the building, the first new The building has been rated BREEAM Excellent. 134
  • 136. 135
  • 137. Architect: Sheppard Robson Disciplines: Building services engineering, structural engineering, ground engineering, civil engineering, fire engineering and risk assessment (FEDRA), computational analysis and simulation (CoSA) Value: £25m 136
  • 138. New Sports and Health Sciences Buildings Completion: 2007 The new Health and Sports Sciences buildings will provide the university with a state of the art facility that enhances the current curriculum. The facility will include a full range of facilities, including a six lane swimming pool with spectator capacity, pool changing and storage rooms, a six court sports hall with storage and bleacher seating, a five-a-side sports hall and multi-activity area, fitness and specialist fitness suite, treatment and assessment rooms, a specialist academic teaching room, a dance studio, a climbing wall and squash courts. Support facilities include administration and office accommodation, café, foyer and reception areas. It is the intention that the building will be rated BREEAM Very Good. Architect: Kennedy Fitzgerald and Associates Disciplines: Building services engineering, structural engineering, ground engineering, fire engineering and risk assessment (FEDRA), computational analysis and simulation (CoSA), acoustics, specialist lighting design (LiT) Value: £30m 137
  • 139. Stirling Sports Village Stirling, UK Completion: ongoing The new Stirling Sports Village is situated on a 137 acre site on the north east edge of Stirling and will comprise of a mixed use leisure and sports development. The proposed facility will be purpose built as a regional sports facility as part of SportScotland and the Scottish Executive’s National and Regional Sports Facility Strategy. The new sports village will be capable of hosting local, regional and national sports and leisure events and act as a support facility for international events. The facility has also been designed to accommodate cultural and other events. The integrated engineering solution has allowed a flexible and low energy, sustainable environment to be created and facilities have been created for a Sports Hall with 12 badminton courts, swimming pool (25m x 6 lanes), learner pool (100m2) and leisure water pool (100m2). Health and fitness facilities are provided, including provisions for an aerobics and dance studio. The National Curling Academy and a national standard ice pad have been incorporated within the design, with provisions for a fixed seating area. Further accommodation is provided, including rehabilitation and sports injury facilities, outdoor football pitches (6 x five-a-side pitches), one water based artificial hockey pitch, together with all associated changing facilities, offices, café and retail facilities. 138
  • 140. Client: Stirling Council Architect: S & P Architects Disciplines: Building services engineering, structural engineering, ground engineering, fire engineering and risk assessment (FEDRA), computational analysis and simulation (CoSA) Value: £25m 139
  • 141. John Wheatley College Glasgow, UK Completion: 2007 The John Wheatley College East End Campus building has been designed as an exemplar low carbon further education campus, and sets new standards in energy efficiency and sustainable design. The aim was to minimise future environmental impacts both directly, and also through the profound educational value of sustainable practices. Both building and building services design were examined for environmental impact. Several features contribute to both low energy use and sustainability, including exposed thermal mass, extensive natural ventilation, wind-controlled exhaust ventilation chimneys, facade shading and natural daylighting. There is also a biomass boiler, solar thermal collectors, air sourced heat pumps, PV cells in the ETFE foil roof and rainwater harvesting. The natural daylight and ventilation is especially important, as wind controlled exhaust chimneys achieve a passively-controlled climate in the classrooms. These features benefit both students and the local community, who use the building during out of house hours. The building achieved the highest rating of ‘Excellent’ under a BREEAM Bespoke 2005 Design and Procurement assessment. As an extension to BREEAM, performance information on all the sustainable technologies is available for public view. This state of the art campus contributes greatly to the broader economic growth and redevelopment of the area. It also sets new standards in terms of both energy demand and carbon emissions, and a comprehensive post-occupancy evaluation process will set new sector benchmarks. 140
  • 142. Client: John Wheatley College Architect: ABK Architects Disciplines: Building services engineering, structural engineering, ground engineering, civil engineering, sustainable and alternative technologies (SAT), fire engineering design and risk assessment (FEDRA), computational analysis and simulation (CoSA), acoustics Value: £10m GIA Awards 2007: Education Category – Winner Sustainability Category – Winner 141
  • 143. Ravenscraig Regional Sports Facility Ravenscraig, UK Completion: ongoing The new Ravenscraig Regional Sports Facility is located on the former Ravenscraig Steelworks site. The proposed facility will be purpose built as a Regional Sports Facility as part of SportScotland and the Scottish Executive’s National and Regional Sports Facilities Strategy. The flagship development will be capable of hosting local, regional and national sports and leisure events and act as a support facility for international events. The facility has also been designed to accommodate cultural and other events. There will be an educational association with local schools and colleges in the Motherwell, Coatbridge and Cumbernauld area. The integrated engineering solution has allowed a flexible and low energy, sustainable environment to be created providing facilities for football, using a full size indoor football pitch, athletics, badminton, gymnastics, volleyball, basketball, hockey, handball, martial arts and rugby. 142
  • 144. Client: North Lanarkshire Council Architect: HOK SVE Disciplines: Building services engineering, structural engineering, ground engineering, fire engineering and risk assessment (FEDRA), computational analysis and simulation (CoSA) Value: £30m 143
  • 145. Queen Margaret University Musselburgh, UK Completion: 2007 The Musselburgh campus for Queen Margaret University in south east Edinburgh brings its three sites together on one 14-hectare, purpose-built location catering for 5,000 students. Sustainability is key to the design of the campus, which includes accommodation blocks for 800 students. The project incorporates major infrastructure work, including: a new junction on the A1, diverting overhead power lines, a service tunnel under a freight railway line and a 6km-long foul drainage network. The site also incorporates a sustainable urban drainage system to moderate the flow of rainwater coming off roofs and paved areas, rather than contributing to downstream flooding. The building has been rated BREEAM Excellent and CEEQual Excellent. 144
  • 146. Client: Queen Margaret University Architects: Dyer Associates Disciplines: Structural engineering, ground engineering, civil engineering Value: £80m 145
  • 147. Riverside Museum, Glasgow Museum of Transport Glasgow, UK Completion: ongoing From just a glance at the design of the breathtaking Glasgow Museum of Transport, it appears that the engineering team on the project will get all the plaudits. The spectacular pleated and curved metal roof will be an achievement and looks certain to become a major landmark for Scotland and architecture, not least for being only the second – and first sizeable – example of Pritzker Prize-winning architect Zaha Hadid’s work on UK soil. Whilst the structural engineers will be due great praise for their The solution chosen to control such large spaces is an work, the building services team will be due acknowledgement all-air system providing heating, cooling, humidification or for meeting an equally challenging brief – creating a low energy dehumidification as required. The supplied air has to be heating and cooling system, largely hidden away within the introduced at a height of around 7m, presenting a challenge fabric of the museum’s extraordinary roof and walls. of realising comfortable conditions in the occupied zone some way beneath it. At the heart of Hadid’s design for the Riverside Museum are large, column-free spaces, covered by an innovative combined This is achieved through motorised supply grilles in the walls wall and roof structure, clad in zinc sheets. The main exhibition which will be adjusted to give the desired angle of throw: space will be 6,500m2, with the average width of other spaces directing warm air downwards in winter and pushing cool air ranging from 30m to 50m over, in some cases, 200m lengths. into the space during summer. Adjustable supply ventilation Given this desire for open spaces, the building services team grilles throughout the exhibition space will help keep has had to create a strategy that is both discreet and powerful. environmental conditions stable. 3 146
  • 148. 147
  • 149. Service strip profile Stable environmental conditions achieved blends seamlessly throughout exhibition space by the use of with architecture adjustable supply grilles Roof overhang on glazed facades provides natural solar shading in summer Motorised, adjustable supply grilles throw cool air outwards during summer and ensure warm air reaches the occupied zone during winter Detail A Services within walls High efficiency metal halide lighting projected onto roof profile is then reflected onto walls and floors Specialist glazing is adopted which maintains a degree of natural daylight but at the same time prevents excessive solar gain, glare and ultra violet radiation which may damage artefacts on displays 148
  • 150. Indication of underground trenching system which facilitates hidden services distribution throughout main gallery spaces Environmental close control within main gallery spaces All major plant items are within the building envelope and generally at high level within the roof profile. This removed the need for an external plant compound 149
  • 151. As well as making great use of daylight through roof lights, cut into the structure, exhibition lighting will come from high efficiency, wall mounted projectors directed upwards then reflected down, providing a diffuse light to the walls and floor level. All of the above will require a great deal of collaboration between the structural and building services team – something of a speciality for Buro Happold and an approach that should lead to great acclaim all round. 150
  • 152. Client: Glasgow City Council Architect: Zaha Hadid Architects Disciplines: Building services engineering, structural engineering, ground engineering, fire engineering and risk assessment (FEDRA), computational analysis and simulation (CoSA), acoustics, inclusive design, specialist lighting design (LiT) Value: £55m 151
  • 153. The Museum of Liverpool Liverpool, UK Completion: ongoing One of the buildings at the heart of Liverpool’s year as European Capital of Culture is a new museum exploring the city’s history, housed inside a key structure that points to its future. The paradox of looking back in a building so resolutely modern the engineering design of the superstructure has largely been is made all the more apparent by its location, adjacent to the driven by the site conditions. iconic Three Graces on Liverpool’s waterfront. But the intention is to complement, rather than compete with, these world- The museum site straddles infilled docks and the route of the famous buildings, partly through the low height of the structure, Mersey rail tunnel, which limits where the foundations could which hosts two galleries separated by a public space. be laid. Consequently, the lower level of the building has post-tensioned ground beams acting as a transfer structure This idea continues inside where the two gallery spaces offer between large diameter piles, driven down through the infill but the very best views in the area – across the Mersey looking without encroaching on the exclusion zone around the tunnel. south and back to the Three Graces on the north. The space between the galleries is a public thoroughfare, continuing the The upper gallery, acting as a separate structural system, path of the promenade running along the waterfront either side spans the tunnel thanks to the large steel trusses within the of the museum. side walls. This gives great strength while allowing the internal exhibition space to remain largely column-free. Buro Happold’s Glasgow office has provided multi-disciplinary engineering for this challenging project, designed by renowned Separation of these structures also helps accommodate the Danish architects 3XN. While their inclusion of a 20m cantilever degree of thermal expansion to be expected in 130m-long at either end of the museum creates specific structural issues, continuous structural trusses. 3 152
  • 154. 153
  • 155. Buffer zone creates a stable separation between gallery and large glass facade Further challenges have come in the building services design. The need to accommodate the architect’s demand for invisible services, the client’s desire for low energy consumption and height restrictions from the planning authorities have seen the services plant sandwiched within the whole building’s structural zones. Although the year of culture is a temporary event, it will leave behind at least one legacy in the innovative form of this radical museum, a building that, in the years to come, will surely become as recognised and emblematic of Liverpool as its famous neighbours. Fresh air introduced to gallery spaces through a combination of high level wall grilles and low level floor grilles 154
  • 156. Roof mounted air handling units Central roof level plant area Distribution ceiling void Primary ductwork distribution through structural beam Air flow system duplicated Castellated steel trusses span full castelations about building centre line width of gallery to support roof Fresh air heated and/or cooled before Cellular reinforced concrete raft, foundation Upper and lower gallery services fed from Main stair, lift and service cores provide entering gallery space depending on bridges, underground railway tunnel and central technical floor, ventilation distribution support for perimeter steel truss walls external environmental conditions historical dock achieved through fat walls 155
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  • 158. Client: NML Architect: 3XN (supported by AEW) Disciplines: Structural engineering, ground engineering, building services engineering, fire engineering and risk assessment (FEDRA), computational simulation and analysis (CoSA), inclusive design, acoustics, sustainability and alternative technologies consultant (SAT), BREEAM consultant, specialist lighting design (LiT) Value: £45m 157
  • 159. Dundee City Council Headquarters Dundee, UK Completion: ongoing The Council’s vision for the development is to create a new sustainable office to enable effective and efficient delivery of the Dundee City Council’s front-line services from a one-stop facility adding value to the community, as well as providing an exemplar design for urban and sustainable development within the city centre. The accommodation includes civic administrative headquarters for Dundee City Council and the main facility for the majority of city council front-line service. The new building located at the corner of North Lindsay Street and Candle Lane will provide a gross internal floor area of 13,000 square metres and facilities for over 800 staff. The listed building facade on North Lindsay Street restricts the new build along the eastern boundary to a maximum four storeys, whilst the new build structure to the rest of the development having seven storeys. The integrated engineering strategy has been developed using the heavyweight nature of the concrete superstructure and exposed thermal mass to provide a stable indoor climate. In areas of high heat gains, chilled beams will be used to meet the proposed comfort criteria. The building has been rated BREEAM Excellent. 158
  • 160. Client: Dundee City Council Architect: Reiach and Hall Disciplines: Structural engineering, ground engineering, building services engineering, fire engineering and risk assessment (FEDRA), computational simulation and analysis (CoSA), BREEAM consultant Value: £30m 159
  • 161. Forth Ports Hub Masterplan Edinburgh, UK Completion: ongoing Buro Happold has been appointed as the multi-discipline engineers for the Forth Ports Hub Masterplan. The scope of the study has been to develop plan options based upon site and market demand assessments and preliminary branding and visioning ideas, as well as to review and evaluate each option and select the most promising for further design development. The review and evaluation process included the input from traffic, environmental and engineering teams, external agents for commercial, residential and retail land use feasibility and valuation, and the Forth Port project team. The key to Waterfront Developments is due in part to several factors: a rich mix of uses including retail, housing and workplaces that extend activity beyond the typical nine-to-five cycle, the attraction of activities and events throughout the year, a mix of adult and family entertainment and restaurants, a secure user friendly public environment, and convenient parking. Buro Happold have been working on the infrastructure, transportation and environmental engineering, together with the development of a sustainability plan for the scheme. 160
  • 162. Client: Forth Ports Architect: RTKL Architects Disciplines: Infrastructure engineering, environmental engineering, structural engineering, ground engineering, building services engineering, fire engineering and risk assessment (FEDRA), computational simulation and analysis (CoSA), specialist lighting design (LiT), sustainability consultant and alternative technologies (SAT) Value: £600m 161
  • 163. Loch Lomond and the Trossachs Headquarters Balloch, UK Completion: ongoing The new Loch Lomond and Trossachs Headquarters is located in the town of Balloch and consists of a two-storey curved timber structure with a stone and glass frontage, twin pitched slated roofs and a central glazed atrium. The building provides naturally ventilated workspace accommodation for the users and includes meeting and conference facilities that will be available for use by community groups and partner agencies. The design has focused on providing an environmental sustainable design solution; timber has been used throughout, including a structural frame made from Scottish sourced Douglas Fir, locally sourced timber for the secondary framework and Scottish oak veneered ceiling panels in key locations. The specification also includes twin pitched roofs using natural slate finish, natural stone front elevation and paving and vertical lapped Scottish Larch on the back and side elevations. The architectural form has been developed to allow more than 80% of the building to be naturally ventilated, with excellent daylighting throughout. The energy strategy has adopted the use of a biomass boiler as the primary source of heating. The building is fully insulated using sheep's wool and a reed bed has been adopted to provide a Sustainable Urban Drainage (SUDs) solution, cycle storage facilities and full shower and changing facilities are provided for staff cycling to work. The building has been rated BREEAM Excellent. 162
  • 164. Client: Loch Lomond and the Trossachs National Park Headquarters Architect: Page and Park Architects Disciplines: Building services engineering, structural engineering, ground engineering, fire engineering and risk assessment (FEDRA), computational simulation and analysis (CoSA), specialist lighting design (LiT), sustainability and alternative technologies Consultant (SAT) Value: £5m 163
  • 165. Children’s Discovery Centre Damascus, Syria Completion: ongoing Buro Happold, Henning Larsen Architects and Martha Schwartz won an international design competition to design a new educational discovery centre for children in Damascus, Syria. The Massar Discovery Centre is a special opportunity to create the ultimate fun learning zone for children, where they can explore, decode and engage, not only with the hands-on exhibits, but also with the building itself. The materials have been selected to emphasize Syria’s traditions and skills, while the internal facades expose the building’s construction as part of the learning process. The low energy building is seasonally sensitive, and energy cycles are visible as part of the learning experience. A strategy was developed to respond to a Mediterranean climate, with warm sunny summers but cold, wet winters. Clay plaster internally has been developed as part of a breathable wall construction, allowing humidity to escape whilst retaining heat gathered from solar panels. Biomass boilers are used, to ensure a sustainable fuel source, and combined heat and power (CHP) units generate electricity – which allows waste heat to be recovered and used. Meanwhile, cooling takes place using a ground energy storage system, utilising earth tubes, which also provide ventilation. Finally, galleries will be ventilated by passing air through hollowcore slabs from the courtyard, passively heating and cooling the air by harnessing the thermal mass of the slabs. 164
  • 166. Client: Massar Architect: Henning Larsen Architects Disciplines: Building services engineering, structural engineering, ground engineering, fire engineering and risk assessment (FEDRA), computational simulation and analysis (CoSA), facade engineering Value: £25m International Design Competition 2006 – Winner 165
  • 167. Wexford Council Offices Wexford, Ireland Completion: ongoing This winning scheme, designed by NORD and Buro Happold, features a single facility with six buildings around a public internal street. The form and orientation optimises energy efficiency, with a double facade tempering incoming air. The outer layer glass panels will filter unwanted solar energy, while the windows in the inner wall maximise air infiltration and exfiltration. The cavity will incorporate a cleaning walkway. Each of the department blocks will minimise heating loads through insulation, with further reduction through the glass rain screen surrounding the building – a buffer space and thermal wrapper in winter. Furthermore, it will capture solar energy, raising its temperature 5 to 10°C above the external temperature, reducing heat loss and pre-heating incoming air. Ventilation is achieved by naturally minimising energy powering fans, and in summer underfloor heating will cease. The central street area requires minimal heat in winter for fabric protection, but the heavyweight concrete roof and glazed walls provide a relatively stable environment. The car park will collect solar energy, absorbed by the concrete and tarmac. A ground loop below the surface will gather heat and convert it to heating energy. The renewable technology and natural ventilation set new standards in low energy design. The target is to achieve 30% less energy than the current benchmark, and the building has been rated BREEAM Excellent. 166
  • 168. Client: Wexford County Council Architect: NORD in association with AGP Disciplines: Building services engineering, structural engineering, ground engineering, fire engineering and risk assessment (FEDRA), computational simulation and analysis (CoSA), acoustics, security consultancy, facade engineering, BREEAM Consultant, specialist lighting design (LiT) Value: £25m International Design Competition 2006 – Winner 167
  • 169. Greenock Arts Centre Greenock, UK Completion: ongoing The proposed site for the new arts centre is on the East India Harbour in Greenock; part of the regeneration of Greenock Docks. The masterplan is a residential-led development around the East India and Victoria Harbours marina area. The introduction of a theatre enriches the development, and helps integrate the Harbour Development with Greenock. For Greenock Arts Guild, the harbour site – a disused graving dock from its historical shipbuilding past – is an opportunity to broaden the audience base. An environmental strategy has been developed to provide a sustainable and low energy proposal, including a displacement ventilation system for the main auditorium. A naturally ventilated auditorium drawing air from the graving dock under the building had to be discounted due to flood risk, but further energy reduction measures include cross-flow ventilated meeting rooms and a naturally ventilated atrium type foyer. The foyer uses underfloor heating, ensuring only occupied space benefits. Energy efficiency measures include a zoning proposal for the ventilation system in the main auditorium to cater for smaller performances. Most performances occur in winter, so heat recovery will be harnessed from the occupancy and lighting heat gains in the auditorium itself. Other measures include spray taps and low flush WCs to reduce water demand. Renewable energy proposals include a rainwater harvesting system for toilet flushing and a solar thermal system to pre-heat domestic hot water. 168
  • 170. Client: Greenock Arts Guild Architect: LDN Architects Disciplines: Building services engineering, structural engineering, ground engineering, fire engineering and risk assessment (FEDRA), computational simulation and analysis (CoSA), acoustics, security consultancy, BREEAM Consultant Value: £5m 169
  • 171. Everton Football Club Stadium Kirkby, UK Completion: ongoing Buro Happold is providing the multi-discipline engineering design, security, acoustics and fire strategy for this landmark development in Kirkby, Liverpool. As well as its 50,000 capacity with 24 corporate boxes, the stadium will host quality hospitality facilities and act as a focal point for regeneration of the area. Meeting the very variable demands for high performance lighting, heating and services throughout is key to this project, while the fire engineers have to incorporate safe evacuation routes for a capacity crowd. Further challenges come in making the utilities infrastructure capable of further expansion, potentially for up to 60,000 spectators with the hospitality capacity rising from 1,700 to 3,750 people. 170
  • 172. Client: Everton Football Club/Barr Construction Architect: Barr Construction Disciplines: Building services engineering, structural engineering, ground engineering, fire engineering and risk assessment (FEDRA), computational simulation and analysis (CoSA), acoustics, security consultancy Value: £100m 171
  • 173. New Gateway Centre Ras Al Khaimah, United Arab Emirates Completion: ongoing Snøhetta and Buro Happold have been commissioned with the task of creating an iconic gateway building for the new capital city of Ras Al-Khaimah in the United Arab Emirates. This mixed-use development is destined to become the iconic symbol for the Emirate of Ras Al-Khaimah. Taking inspiration from the undulating sands around it, the Gateway building will be a striking 300,000m2 complex, housing a conference centre, exhibition halls, retail centre and three hotels. Buro Happold’s multi-disciplinary team will not only ensure the structure meets the demands of the architect for a unique building recognised around the world, but will provide capacity for the huge range of building services required on the site. With a five star plus hotel in the Gateway, demand for quality services will be as great as the need for a first class structure. The project includes a 66 storey high rise tower as part of the development and has enabled our tall buildings expertise within the region, to be applied to the organic form. 172
  • 174. Client: RAKEEN Architect: Snøhetta Disciplines: Building services engineering, structural engineering, ground engineering, civil engineering, fire engineering and risk assessment (FEDRA), computational simulation and analysis (CoSA), acoustics, security consultancy Value: £400m 173
  • 175. Buro Happold Sectors Education 1 Edinburgh’s Telford College 1 2 3 4 2 Alsion Campus at Syddansk University 5 6 7 8 3 University of Edinburgh Projects 4 Queens University Belfast Projects 5 Hazelwood School 6 University of Strathclyde Projects 7 John Wheatley College 8 Queen Margaret University Arts and Culture 1 Theatre Royal 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 2 Tolbooth 9 10 11 12 3 Tramway 13 14 15 16 4 Urquhart Castle Visitor’s Centre 5 Pitlochry Festival Theatre 6 Royal Lyceum Theatre 7 Eastgate Arts Centre 8 Danish National Opera House 9 The Galeri Caernarfon 10 Glenturret Distillery Centre 11 Perth Concert Hall 12 THGL Studios 13 The Calyx, Scotland’s National Garden Gateway 14 Children’s Discovery Centre 15 Greenock Arts Centre 16 Syddansk Concert Hall Sports and Leisure 1 St Andrews International Centre 1 2 3 4 2 The Aqualibrium Centre 5 6 7 8 3 Clydebank Leisure Centre 4 Royal Commonwealth Pool 5 Stirling Sports Village 6 Ravenscraig Regional Sports Facility 7 Everton FC Stadium 8 University of Strathclyde Sports and Health Sciences 174
  • 176. Public Buildings 1 The Tannahill Centre 1 2 3 4 2 ERCO 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 3 National Park Gateway Centre 4 Robin House, Balloch Children’s Hospice 5 New Scottish Parliament 6 Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh 7 Riverside Museum, Glasgow Museum of Transport 8 The Museum of Liverpool 9 Loch Lomond and the Trossachs HQ 10 Wexford Council Offices 11 Children’s Discovery Centre 12 Greenock Arts Centre Scientific and Medical 1 Robin House, Balloch Children’s Hospice 1 2 3 4 2 Alsion Campus at Syddansk University 3 University of Strathclyde Projects 4 University of Edinburgh Projects Historic Buildings 1 Hopetoun House 1 2 3 4 2 Theatre Royal 3 Anchor Mills 4 Dundee City Council Headquarters Commercial 1 St Andrews International Centre 1 2 3 4 2 Urban Outfitters 5 6 7 8 3 The Wright Business Centre 4 Glasgow Audi 5 BAA Car Parks 6 European Patent Office 7 Forth Ports Hub Masterplan 8 New Gateway Centre 175
  • 177. Buro Happold Awards The Tannahill Centre Eastgate Arts Centre Scottish Enterprise Regeneration Design Scottish Enterprise Dynamic Place Awards Award 1997 – Winner 2005 – Commendation RIBA Award 1997 – Winner National Park Gateway Centre Royston Recording Studio Civic Trust Award, 2003 – Winner Scottish Regeneration Award 2000 Best Dynamic Place Award, 2003 – Winner Practice – Winner Danish National Opera House Theatre Royal Gulvprisen 2004 National Lighting Design Awards 1998 Fagbladet Byggeri, Udvalgte Byggerier 2004 – Commendation BSJ Building Services International Consultant 2005 – Commendation Tolbooth United States Institute of Theater Technology Civic Trust Awards Commendation 2003 Merit Award – 2005 – Winner Award of Merit, International Illumination RIBA Award 2002 – Winner Design Awards 2007 – Winner RIBA Crown Estate Commission Conservation Award 2002 – Winner Anchor Mills Dundee by Design Award 2002 – Winner Scottish Design Awards 2007 Structural Scottish Enterprise Dynamic Place Design Award – Commendation Award 2002 – Winner Saltire Awards 2006 – Commendation Royal Institute of Chartered Surveyors Awards Tramway 2006 Highly Commended Scottish Design Awards 2001 Architecture Scottish Awards for Quality in Planning 2005 Grand Prix – Winner Development on the Ground Award Scottish Design Awards 2001 Best Public Fire Safety Engineering Award, 2004 – Winner Building – Winner GIA Design Award 2006 – Winner GIA Awards 2000 – Arts Award – Winner The Galeri Caernarfon ERCO RIBA Award 2005 Winner Scottish Design Awards 2004 Best Regeneration Project – Commendation Roses Award Best Public Building Bronze Award 2006 – Winner Urquhart Castle Visitor’s Centre Scottish Design Awards 2006 Architecture Grand Prix – Winner Gold Green Tourism Business Scheme GTBS Award – Winner Scottish Design Awards 2006 Best Building for Public Use – Winner Saltire Society Awards 2002 – Commendation 176
  • 178. Robin House The Aqualibrium Centre The Civic Trust Awards 2007 Health Scottish Award for Quality in Planning 2006 and Wellbeing Award – Winner Scottish Design Awards 2007 Northern GIA Design Award 2006 – Winner Exposure – Winner Civic Trust Award 2007 Glenturret Distillery Centre BAFTA award in the multi media The Wright Business Centre cinemagraphic category – Winner Scottish Design Awards 2007 Best Marketing Brand Design Awards 2003, Commercial Project – Shortlist Best Brand Experience – Winner GIA Design Award 2006 – Winner Visit Scotland 5 star rating – Winner BAA Car Parks New Scottish Parliament Safer Parking Award Park Mark™, 2005 Stirling Prize 2005 – Winner – Winner Scottish Design Awards 2005 Architecture UK Car Park of the Year, 2005 – Winner Grand Prix – Winner Nominee European Parking Awards, 2005 Scottish Design Awards 2005 Best Publicly – Best Design Category Funded Building – Winner Civic Trust Awards 2006 – Winner Alsion Campus at Syddansk University International Design Competition 2003 – Winner Perth Concert Hall RIBA European Awards 2007 – Winner BSJ Building Services Project of the Year 2007 – Winner European Patent Office RIAS Andrew Doolan Award for Architecture International Design Competition 2005 – Winner 2006 – Shortlisted British Construction Industry Awards 2006 Children’s Discovery Centre – Regeneration Award Winner International Design Competition 2006 – Winner Dynamic Place Awards 2006 – Commendation Scottish Design Awards 2006 Best Building Wexford Council Offices for Public Use – Commendation International Design Competition 2006 – Winner The Dundee Institute of Architects Award – Winner Prospect MRUK Survey Civic Trust Awards 2006 – Winner Best Building Services Engineer 2006 The Guild of Architectural Ironmongers/ – Winner RIBA Awards Best Structural Engineer 2006 – Runner Up 177
  • 179. Photography Credits Alan McAteer Mandy Reynolds Keith Hunter Daniel Hopkinson Andrew Lee Martin Phillimore Chris Hill Land Design Studio Gillies and Wills Brian Cassidy Page and Park Architects Bennetts Associates/ Reaich and Hall SBRA Architects/ Robinson Patterson Zaha Hadid Architects 3X Nielsen Snøhetta 178

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