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Webquest Art Thief

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A webquest for art thieves and art teachers!

A webquest for art thieves and art teachers!

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  • 1. Art Thief! Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Designed by Benjamin Worrell [email_address] Based on a template from The WebQuest Page A webQuest for high school
  • 2. Introduction Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] You are an art thief ! Many of the works of art in the world today are incredibly expensive, some are even priceless, so it is up to you to take the easy way out and plan a heist to liberate these masterpieces from the tyrannical big business which holds them captive and only allows them to be seen for a reasonable price of admission. But we cannot simply rush in and take what we please, a good art thief knows that a serious amount of time should be spent in planning for such a heist. You must first decide on the specific works of art you wish to liberate, then find their locations, their size and dimensions, their media, and their historical significance. You also will need to find out as much as you can about the museums in which they are being held captive. Information is key! The art thief must be cool, cunning, and possess a sharp wit! Are you up to the challenge?
  • 3. The Task Student Page Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ]
    • As a wannabe art thief, it will be your job to collect all of the resources necessary to pull off the perfect heist. But what works of art are worth stealing, anyway? Which works of art possess the historical and technical qualities which would make them worthy of the effort you are about to put forth?
    • In a group with two other art lovers (thieves), you must select FIVE works of art from the list presented under Process and find where in the world they are located, as well as the following information:
    • Vitals (artist, date, media, dimensions, location, picture of the work of art)
    • Historical Significance (Where was it created? Why? Patronage? Cost?)
    • The payoff (Why steal it? Aesthetics? Importance? Spite? Justify your choice!)
    • You will also need to acquire as much information as possible on the museum in which the work of art is located. Where is it located? What are its hours of operation? What is it famous for? Everything is important!
    • Compile this information into a folder for easy reference! You are the thief!
    Title
  • 4. The Process Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ]
    • You will be placed into a group of three students by the teacher!
    • You will then be asked to choose from the following list FIVE works of art to liberate:
    • - Venus and Mars, Botticelli
    • - The Madonna of the Pinks, Rafael
    • - The Virgin of the Rocks, Leonardo da Vinci
    • - Self Portrait at the Age of 34, Rembrandt
    • - Mona Lisa, Leonardo da Vinci
    • - The Slave, Michelangelo
    • - Gertrude Stein, Pablo Picasso
    • - Arc of Petals, Alexander Calder
    • - The Poet, Pablo Picasso
    • - Toilette, George Grosz
    • 3. After your group has chosen five works of art from the list, you will then need to do an internet search to discover the location and other pertinent information about each work of art (see The Task for complete list of required information)
    • After you have acquired all required information, you will need to organize the information into a folder for easy reference as well as illustrate 3-5 facts you have uncovered throughout your research. These illustrations should relate directly to each specific work of art.
    • After your packet of information has been created, you will give a brief presentation to the rest of the class and share what you have discovered.
    • The following websites will be useful in your research:
    • - http://www.louvre.fr/llv/commun/home.jsp?bmLocale=en
    • - http://www.nationalgallery.org.uk/about/contact.htm
    • - http://www.guggenheim.org/
  • 5. Evaluation: Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Beginning 1 Developing 2 Accomplished 3 Exemplary 4 Score Quality of Information Student acquires a low level of pertinent and quality information on selected works of art. Student acquires a moderate level of pertinent and quality information on selected works of art. Student acquires a moderately high level of pertinent and quality information on selected works of art. Student acquires a high level of pertinent and quality information on selected works of art. Number of Artworks Student presents research on less than THREE works of art. Student presents research on THREE works of art. Student presents research on FOUR works of art. Student presents research on FIVE different works of art. Presentation of information Little information (less than 79%) is presented in an organized, easily read, and interesting manner. Some information (79-88%) is presented in an organized, easily read, and interesting manner. Most information (89-99%) is presented in an organized, easily read, and interesting manner. All information is presented in an organized, easily read, and interesting manner. Group work/use of tools Some students in a group are not sharing responsibility and the internet is not used in a mature, responsible manner. Some students in a group contribute slightly more to finished products than others, and the internet is mostly used in a mature, responsible manner. Some students in a group contribute slightly more to finished products than others, and the internet is used in a mature, responsible manner. All students in a group contribute equally to finished product and the internet is used in a mature, responsible manner. Classroom behavior All students in a group are on task and working for very little of the class period. All students in a group are on task and working for some of the class period. All students in a group are on task and working for the majority of the class period. All students in a group are on task and working for the entire class period.
  • 6. Conclusion Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Congratulations! You are now more than prepared for your exciting adventure into the world as an art thief. There is one issue which you may not have been aware of at the very beginning of this information-gathering experience: stealing art is illegal. Yikes! I know! It is a shame, but it looks like the planning stages of this project are about all we can safely complete without fear of incarceration for 10-20 years. This small setback aside, over the course of this fact-finding adventure you have acquired invaluable knowledge related to art history and the various art museums located all over the world. Do not be discouraged, for this knowledge will serve you well in further understanding the artists and works of art which make our world such a rich and wonderful place to live!
  • 7. Credits & References Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Images: jasharawan.com/images/blogimages/thief.jpg www.popartuk.com ipkitten.blogspot.com You may visit The WebQuest Page and The WebQuest Slideshare Group to create your own webquest!
  • 8. ART THIEF! [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page A WebQuest for 12th Grade Art Designed by Benjamin Worrell [email_address] Based on a template from The WebQuest Page Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • 9. Introduction (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page This lesson originated as an idea for a means of getting art students to consider the entire history of a specific work of art in a fun and innovative manner. I want students to be able to talk about a work of art by taking into consideration not just the media or artist but also the historical significance of the work. I feel art students should be able to discuss a work of art’s journey throughout time all the way to the present, its patronage, auction cost, etc. The students must be able to answer the question: What is so special about this work of art? In this lesson, students will be required to assume the role of an “art thief.” They will be asked to select five works of art from a teacher-generated list to research. Because an art thief would only desire the most precious and interesting works of art for his own private collection, students will be required to research the when, where, why, and how of each specific work of art. In the end, they will need to justify their decision to “steal” that particular work of art over all others based upon historical facts found online. Additionally, students will need to provide information on where and how the work has been displayed in the past as well as its current location. In essence, the students will become experts on five works of art and will be able to present that information in an organized fashion. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • 10. Learners (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page This lesson is designed for 11 th and 12 th grade art students. The lesson will anchor the art history portion of an upper level general arts course. The lesson will rely heavily on research and critical thinking skills of students, as well as allow students to become familiar with several works of art on a more intimate level than usual. Students will need to possess basic computer literacy as this assignment will rely heavily on internet usage and word processing. Students should also be required to take a basic internet safety course as they will be using a search engine to locate their specific works of art. Because this assignment is designed for older high school students, proper use of the internet can be regulated fairly easily by the teacher. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • 11. Curriculum Standards (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page
    • Visual Arts Standards for Lesson:
    • Students recognize and use the visual arts as a form of communication
    • Students relate the visual arts to various historical and cultural tradtions
    • Students analyze and evaluate the characteristics, merits, and meanings of works of art.
    • Additionally, students will be working in a group to solve a specific problem. Teamwork will be key in the research and writing processes. Students will also be required to exercise critical thinking skills in the locating and evaluation of specific works of art. Students will also be required to creatively produce a means for presenting the information they have discovered.
    Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • 12. The Process (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page
    • The teacher should leave the actual webquest process fairly wide open so that students feel capable of carrying out the required research on their own. Because of our modern technological age, the teacher can be assured that almost every single student will be more than capable of using a search engine to discover information online. The teacher should be available to facilitate the process and to ensure that the internet is being used in a responsible manner.
    • Each group will require a computer with internet access, and the teacher should take into consideration group dynamics and which students will work well together.
    • You will be placed into a group of three students by the teacher!
    • You will then be asked to choose from the following list FIVE works of art to liberate:
    • - Venus and Mars, Botticelli
    • - The Madonna of the Pinks, Rafael
    • - The Virgin of the Rocks, Leonardo da Vinci
    • - Self Portrait at the Age of 34, Rembrandt
    • - Mona Lisa, Leonardo da Vinci
    • - The Slave, Michelangelo
    • - Gertrude Stein, Pablo Picasso
    • - Arc of Petals, Alexander Calder
    • - The Poet, Pablo Picasso
    • - Toilette, George Grosz
    • 3. After your group has chosen five works of art from the list, you will then need to do an internet search to discover the location and other pertinent information about each work of art (see The Task for complete list of required information)
    • After you have acquired all required information, you will need to organize the information into a folder for easy reference as well as illustrate 3-5 facts you have uncovered throughout your research. These illustrations should relate directly to each specific work of art.
    • After your packet of information has been created, you will give a brief presentation to the rest of the class and share what you have discovered.
    • The following websites will be useful in your research:
    • - http://www.louvre.fr/llv/commun/home.jsp?bmLocale=en
    • - http://www.nationalgallery.org.uk/about/contact.htm
    • - http://www.guggenheim.org/
    • Students should be given 3-4 class periods for this assignment for planning, research, and production.
    • Teacher should ensure that adequate information on each work of art from the list is readily available from internet resources.
    Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • 13. Resources (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page Because all research and production will take place on a computer, the only real resources the teacher will need to provide for students will be a computer with internet access for each group of students. If computers are few, then it would be appropriate to place students into larger groups. One teacher will be more than enough to facilitate this project and to enure that the internet is being used in a mature, responsible manner. The teacher will need to research specific websites for his or her own artwork list for this assignment, but for the example listed under process the following websites may be used: - http://www.louvre.fr/llv/commun/home.jsp?bmLocale=en - http://www.nationalgallery.org.uk/about/contact.htm - http://www.guggenheim.org/ The teacher may or may not choose to make this website list available at the beginning of the assignment depending on the level of research he or she wants the students to achieve. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • 14. Evaluation (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion Beginning 1 Developing 2 Accomplished 3 Exemplary 4 Score Quality of Information Student acquires a low level of pertinent and quality information on selected works of art. Student acquires a moderate level of pertinent and quality information on selected works of art. Student acquires a moderately high level of pertinent and quality information on selected works of art. Student acquires a high level of pertinent and quality information on selected works of art. Number of Artworks Student presents research on less than THREE works of art. Student presents research on THREE works of art. Student presents research on FOUR works of art. Student presents research on FIVE different works of art. Presentation of information Little information (less than 79%) is presented in an organized, easily read, and interesting manner. Some information (79-88%) is presented in an organized, easily read, and interesting manner. Most information (89-99%) is presented in an organized, easily read, and interesting manner. All information is presented in an organized, easily read, and interesting manner. Group work/use of tools Some students in a group are not sharing responsibility and the internet is not used in a mature, responsible manner. Some students in a group contribute slightly more to finished products than others, and the internet is mostly used in a mature, responsible manner. Some students in a group contribute slightly more to finished products than others, and the internet is used in a mature, responsible manner. All students in a group contribute equally to finished product and the internet is used in a mature, responsible manner. Classroom behavior All students in a group are on task and working for very little of the class period. All students in a group are on task and working for some of the class period. All students in a group are on task and working for the majority of the class period. All students in a group are on task and working for the entire class period.
  • 15. Teacher Script (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page
    • At the very beginning of the first day of class, the teacher should, in character, explain the “mission” which each student must complete. The teacher should be sure to include a disclaimer that this is a fictional assignment and that stealing is never a good idea no matter what the circumstances.
    • If the instructor chooses to do so, the beginning of the assignment would be an appropriate time to demonstrate proper usage of the internet as well as the various websites which will be useful during this assignment.
    • Next, the teacher should give several demonstrations of the type and amount of information which should be included in the finished portfolio, as well as include example projects for students to examine.
    • This first part of the lesson should only take about 15 minutes and the teacher should then allow students to begin the process
    • The teacher needs to be readily available throughout the process to answer students’ questions as well as to ensure that the internet is being used properly.
    • On the last day of the assignment, the teacher will allow students to work on finishing up their presentations until about 30 minutes is left in class.
    • The final part of class should be used to allow students to present their projects and justify their reasons for choosing each individual work of art.
    • Students must incorporate the three content standards included in this assignment into their finished products.
    • After all students have presented their portfolios, the teacher should express approval of the students’ work and thank them all for working so hard.
    Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • 16. Conclusion (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page This assignment should have provided a fun and inventive means for students to study art history and gain new perspectives on several famous works of art. The assignment is great for a single class period or an extended period of time, and the teacher is not required to possess any specific skills other than basic internet usage. Students should be able to become involved in the process due to the interesting subject matter, but the concept of tracking a specific work of art from inception to modern day is a highly worthwhile artistic enterprise and will benefit every student who does it. Some teacher may want to slightly alter the concept of this particular assignment should he or she fear parental retribution because of the “stealing.” However, if the teacher approaches the concept in a humorous and tongue-in-cheek manner, this should not be much of a problem. I hope your students enjoy the process and that they have gained a deeper understanding of the study of art history. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • 17. Credits & References (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page Images: www.bitsonline.net/.../picasso_blue_guitar.jpg http://avline.abacusline.co.uk/pictures/jpeg/pics/mona.jpg http://www.ibiblio.org/wm/paint/auth/munch/munch.scream.jpg Include a link back to The WebQuest Page and The WebQuest Slideshare Group so that others can acquire the latest version of this template and training materials. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion