Customer Development Engineering Eric Ries
Customer Development Engineering <ul><li>How do you build a product development team that can thrive in a startup environm...
Problem: known Waterfall Unit of progress: Advance to Next Stage
Problem: known Waterfall Unit of progress: Advance to Next Stage Solution:  known
Problem:  known Solution:  known Waterfall Unit of progress: Advance to Next Stage
Agile Development <ul><li>“ Our highest priority is to satisfy the customer through early and continuous delivery of valua...
Problem:  known Agile (XP) “ Product Owner” or  in-house customer  Unit of progress: Working Software, Features
Problem:  known Solution:  unknown Agile (XP) “ Product Owner” or  in-house customer  Unit of progress: Working Software, ...
Problem:  known Solution:  unknown Agile (XP) “ Product Owner” or  in-house customer  Unit of progress: Working Software, ...
Problem: unknown Customer Development Engineering Unit of progress: Learning about Customers Hypotheses, experiments, insi...
Problem: unknown Solution: unknown Customer Development Engineering Unit of progress: Learning about Customers Hypotheses,...
Customer Development Engineering <ul><li>How do you build a product development team that can thrive in a startup environm...
Problem: unknown Solution: unknown Customer Development Engineering Unit of progress: Learning about Customers Hypotheses,...
Traditional Agile (XP) Tactics <ul><li>Planning game </li></ul><ul><ul><li>programmers estimate effort of implementing cus...
<ul><li>Split-test (A/B) experimentation </li></ul><ul><li>Extremely rapid deployment </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Continuous dep...
Five Why's <ul><li>Any defect that affects a stakeholder is a learning opportunity </li></ul><ul><li>We’re not done until ...
Five Why's Example <ul><li>For example: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Why did we change the software so that we don't make any mon...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

2008 09 06 Eric Ries Haas Columbia Customer Development Engineering

23,600

Published on

Published in: Business, Technology
0 Comments
22 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
23,600
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
383
Comments
0
Likes
22
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

2008 09 06 Eric Ries Haas Columbia Customer Development Engineering

  1. 1. Customer Development Engineering Eric Ries
  2. 2. Customer Development Engineering <ul><li>How do you build a product development team that can thrive in a startup environment? </li></ul><ul><li>Let's start with the traditional way... Waterfall </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“The waterfall model is a sequential software development model in which development is seen as flowing steadily downwards through the phases of requirements analysis, design, implementation, testing (validation), integration, and maintenance.” </li></ul></ul>
  3. 3. Problem: known Waterfall Unit of progress: Advance to Next Stage
  4. 4. Problem: known Waterfall Unit of progress: Advance to Next Stage Solution: known
  5. 5. Problem: known Solution: known Waterfall Unit of progress: Advance to Next Stage
  6. 6. Agile Development <ul><li>“ Our highest priority is to satisfy the customer through early and continuous delivery of valuable software.” - http://agilemanifesto.org/ </li></ul><ul><li>Embrace Change </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Build what you need today </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Process-oriented development so change is painless </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Prefer flexibility to perfection </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Ship early and often </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Test-driven to find and prevent bugs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Continuous improvement vs. ship-and-maintain </li></ul></ul>
  7. 7. Problem: known Agile (XP) “ Product Owner” or in-house customer Unit of progress: Working Software, Features
  8. 8. Problem: known Solution: unknown Agile (XP) “ Product Owner” or in-house customer Unit of progress: Working Software, Features
  9. 9. Problem: known Solution: unknown Agile (XP) “ Product Owner” or in-house customer Unit of progress: Working Software, Features
  10. 10. Problem: unknown Customer Development Engineering Unit of progress: Learning about Customers Hypotheses, experiments, insights
  11. 11. Problem: unknown Solution: unknown Customer Development Engineering Unit of progress: Learning about Customers Hypotheses, experiments, insights
  12. 12. Customer Development Engineering <ul><li>How do you build a product development team that can thrive in a startup environment? </li></ul><ul><li>Let's start with the traditional way... Waterfall </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“The waterfall model is a sequential software development model in which development is seen as flowing steadily downwards through the phases of requirements analysis, design, implementation, testing (validation), integration, and maintenance.” </li></ul></ul>
  13. 13. Problem: unknown Solution: unknown Customer Development Engineering Unit of progress: Learning about Customers Hypotheses, experiments, insights Data, feedback, insights
  14. 14. Traditional Agile (XP) Tactics <ul><li>Planning game </li></ul><ul><ul><li>programmers estimate effort of implementing cust stories </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>customer decides about scope and timing of releases </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Short releases </li></ul><ul><ul><li>new release every 2-3 months </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Simple design </li></ul><ul><ul><li>emphasis on simplest design </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Testing </li></ul><ul><ul><li>development test driven. Unit tests before code </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Refactoring </li></ul><ul><ul><li>restructuring and changes to simplify </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Pair Programming </li></ul><ul><ul><li>2 people at 1 computer </li></ul></ul>
  15. 15. <ul><li>Split-test (A/B) experimentation </li></ul><ul><li>Extremely rapid deployment </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Continuous deployment, if possible </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>At IMVU, 20-30 times per day on average </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Just-in-time architecture and infrastructure </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Incremental investment for incremental benefit </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Software “immune system” to prevent defects </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Five why's </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Use defects to drive infrastructure investments </li></ul></ul>Customer Development Engineering Tactics
  16. 16. Five Why's <ul><li>Any defect that affects a stakeholder is a learning opportunity </li></ul><ul><li>We’re not done until we’ve addressed the root cause… </li></ul><ul><li>… including, why didn’t any of our prevention tactics catch it? </li></ul><ul><li>Technique is to “ask why five times” to get to the root cause </li></ul>
  17. 17. Five Why's Example <ul><li>For example: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Why did we change the software so that we don't make any money anymore? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Why didn’t operations get paged? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Why didn’t the cluster immune system reject the change? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Why didn’t automated tests go red and stop the line? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Why wasn’t the engineer trained not to make the mistake? </li></ul></ul><ul><li>We’re not done until we’ve taken corrective action at all five levels </li></ul>
  1. A particular slide catching your eye?

    Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

×