Presenters: Uche Okereke P03185551 William Stevenson P07273554 Corporate Philanthropy
Introduction <ul><li>History of the Social Responsibility of Corporations </li></ul><ul><li>An Overall Understanding of Co...
Social Responsibility of a  Corporation <ul><li>History </li></ul><ul><li>Principles </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Charity and Ste...
Framework of CSR history (Adapted from Frederick et al, 1992, pg 36)  <ul><li>Stakeholder approach to corporate strategic ...
Social Responsibility of a  Corporation <ul><li>History </li></ul><ul><li>Principles </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Rescue and Fair...
Principle of Fairness and Rescue <ul><li>&quot;The annual revenue of the five largest corporations is more than double the...
Corporate Philanthropy <ul><li>‘ Total corporate giving's for 2006 of 55 respondents in the fortune 100 were 38 billion do...
<ul><li>‘ A survey by the CECP in 2006 found that of the fortune 100 companies 42% of giving's were charitable, 49% were s...
<ul><li>“ social responsibility of business is to increase its profits . . . the corporation is an instrument of the stock...
<ul><li>“ There are indications that even today corporation managers not infrequently use corporate funds in ways which su...
<ul><li>“ there is one and only one social responsibility of business–to use it resources and engage in activities designe...
<ul><li>“ there is one and only one social responsibility of business– to use it resources  and  engage in activities   de...
Strategic Corporate  Philanthropy <ul><li>Seifert et al (2003) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Strategic Linkages to giving </li></u...
<ul><li>“ Strategic philanthropy is the label that has been used to describe corporate philanthropy aimed at helping the b...
<ul><li>“ A strategic reorientation of the firm's  CSR philosophy can support its financial interests as well as other sta...
Porter and Kramer (2002) Adapted from Porter and Kramer 2002, pg 7
<ul><li>“ Corporate Philanthropy is far too important as a social instrument for good to depend on ethical egoism for its ...
Implications of Corporate Philanthropy <ul><li>Sustainability – Smith (1994) </li></ul><ul><li>Globalisation – Simon (1995...
Stakeholder Analysis <ul><li>Who is Corporate Philanthropy conducted for, Dodd said is not just shareholders but all stake...
WHY? Aras and Crowther (2006)
Limitations <ul><li>Transparency –  One water </li></ul><ul><li>Ranking of activities –  Exxon Mobile </li></ul><ul><li>Me...
Conclusions <ul><li>“ Companies are granted the license to operate in their communities, and need to respect that responsi...
<ul><li>“ The annual revenue of the five largest corporations is more than double the GDP (gross domestic product) of the ...
References <ul><li>Bansal P, Roth K. 2000. Why companies go green: A model of ecological responsiveness. Academy of Manage...
References <ul><li>Frederick W., Post J., Davis K., 1992, Seventh edition, “Business and Society; Corporate strategy, publ...
References <ul><li>Smith C N 1994, “The new corporate philanthropy” Havard Business Review, May/June pp 105-115 </li></ul>...
CP Matrix   [B1] Top givers in 1999 according to Council on Economic Priorities and Worth Magazine (2001) ? Oil and Gas Ex...
Exxon  Mobil's  giving's http://www.exxonmobil.com/Corporate/community_contributions_report.aspx
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corporate philantropy

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presentation made by csr master\'s student at de montfort university in 2008

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  • corporate philantropy

    1. 1. Presenters: Uche Okereke P03185551 William Stevenson P07273554 Corporate Philanthropy
    2. 2. Introduction <ul><li>History of the Social Responsibility of Corporations </li></ul><ul><li>An Overall Understanding of Corporate Philanthropy </li></ul><ul><li>Elaborate Practical Examples </li></ul><ul><li>Present Theoretical Findings </li></ul><ul><li>Analyse our Position on CP </li></ul><ul><li>Limitation </li></ul><ul><li>Conclusion </li></ul>
    3. 3. Social Responsibility of a Corporation <ul><li>History </li></ul><ul><li>Principles </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Charity and Stewardship </li></ul></ul>
    4. 4. Framework of CSR history (Adapted from Frederick et al, 1992, pg 36) <ul><li>Stakeholder approach to corporate strategic planning </li></ul><ul><li>Optimum long-run profits rather than maximum short-run profits </li></ul><ul><li>Enlightened self-interest attitude </li></ul><ul><li>Corporate philanthropic foundations (according to CECP survey, 85% of fortune 100 companies have them) </li></ul><ul><li>Private initiatives to solve social problems </li></ul><ul><li>Social partnerships with needy groups </li></ul>Examples <ul><li>Acknowledging business and society interdependence </li></ul><ul><li>Balancing the interest and needs of many diverse groups in society </li></ul><ul><li>Corporate Philanthropy </li></ul><ul><li>Voluntary actions to promote the social good </li></ul>Modern Expression Business, acting as a public trustee, should consider the interest of all who are affected by business decisions and policies Business should give voluntary aid to society’s needy persons and groups Definition Stewardship principle Charity principle
    5. 5. Social Responsibility of a Corporation <ul><li>History </li></ul><ul><li>Principles </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Rescue and Fairness </li></ul></ul>
    6. 6. Principle of Fairness and Rescue <ul><li>&quot;The annual revenue of the five largest corporations is more than double the GDP (gross domestic product) of the poorest 100 countries in the world.&quot; </li></ul>Hsieh, (2008)
    7. 7. Corporate Philanthropy <ul><li>‘ Total corporate giving's for 2006 of 55 respondents in the fortune 100 were 38 billion dollars’ (CECP, 2006) </li></ul><ul><li>Matrix </li></ul>
    8. 8. <ul><li>‘ A survey by the CECP in 2006 found that of the fortune 100 companies 42% of giving's were charitable, 49% were strategic and 9% were commercial’ </li></ul>
    9. 9. <ul><li>“ social responsibility of business is to increase its profits . . . the corporation is an instrument of the stockholders who own it. If the corporation makes a contribution, it prevents the individual stockholder himself deciding how he should dispose of his funds.” </li></ul><ul><li>Milton Friedman 1970 </li></ul>
    10. 10. <ul><li>“ There are indications that even today corporation managers not infrequently use corporate funds in ways which suggest a social responsibility rather than an exclusively profit-making viewpoint. Take, for example, the matter of gifts by business corporations to local charities” </li></ul><ul><li>Dodd, (1932) </li></ul>
    11. 11. <ul><li>“ there is one and only one social responsibility of business–to use it resources and engage in activities designed to increase its profits so long as it stays within the rules of the game, which is to say, engages in open and free competition without deception or fraud”. </li></ul><ul><li>Milton Friedman 1970 </li></ul>
    12. 12. <ul><li>“ there is one and only one social responsibility of business– to use it resources and engage in activities designed to increase its profits so long as it stays within the rules of the game, which is to say, engages in open and free competition without deception or fraud”. </li></ul><ul><li>Milton Friedman 1970 </li></ul>
    13. 13. Strategic Corporate Philanthropy <ul><li>Seifert et al (2003) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Strategic Linkages to giving </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Burke and Logsdon (1996) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Sustainability </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Porter and Kramer (2002) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Social value and Economic Value </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Shaw and Post (1993) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Moral Basis </li></ul></ul>
    14. 14. <ul><li>“ Strategic philanthropy is the label that has been used to describe corporate philanthropy aimed at helping the bottom line. For years, scholars have documented the use of charitable donations as part of a strategic plan to gain a competitive edge ” </li></ul><ul><li>Seifert et al (2003) </li></ul>
    15. 15. <ul><li>“ A strategic reorientation of the firm's CSR philosophy can support its financial interests as well as other stakeholders' interests in the firm” </li></ul><ul><li>Burke and Logsdon (1996) </li></ul>
    16. 16. Porter and Kramer (2002) Adapted from Porter and Kramer 2002, pg 7
    17. 17. <ul><li>“ Corporate Philanthropy is far too important as a social instrument for good to depend on ethical egoism for its support” </li></ul><ul><li>Shaw and Post (1993) </li></ul>
    18. 18. Implications of Corporate Philanthropy <ul><li>Sustainability – Smith (1994) </li></ul><ul><li>Globalisation – Simon (1995) </li></ul><ul><li>Reputation </li></ul><ul><li>Culture </li></ul><ul><li>Profitability- Crowther (2002) </li></ul>
    19. 19. Stakeholder Analysis <ul><li>Who is Corporate Philanthropy conducted for, Dodd said is not just shareholders but all stakeholders. </li></ul><ul><li>Ranking of stakeholders and satisficing the stakeholder with the most pressure. </li></ul>
    20. 20. WHY? Aras and Crowther (2006)
    21. 21. Limitations <ul><li>Transparency – One water </li></ul><ul><li>Ranking of activities – Exxon Mobile </li></ul><ul><li>Measurement of Giving </li></ul><ul><li>Level of Management involvement – strong or weak or top or bottom </li></ul>
    22. 22. Conclusions <ul><li>“ Companies are granted the license to operate in their communities, and need to respect that responsibility” </li></ul><ul><li>Leaders Magazine Inc., (2007) and Crowther (200) </li></ul>
    23. 23. <ul><li>“ The annual revenue of the five largest corporations is more than double the GDP (gross domestic product) of the poorest 100 countries in the world, so it is very natural for people to ask, 'Why are MNCs not doing more to assist those people in need for they appear well placed to do so ” </li></ul>Hsieh, (2008)
    24. 24. References <ul><li>Bansal P, Roth K. 2000. Why companies go green: A model of ecological responsiveness. Academy of Management Journal 43(4): 717-736. </li></ul><ul><li>Burke L., and Logsdon J., 1996, “How corporate social responsibility pays off”, Long Range Planning , 29(4), 495-502 </li></ul><ul><li>Cannon T., 1994, “Corporate responsibility; A textbook on Business Ethics, Governance, Environment: Roles and responsibilities”, Harlow, Pearson Education Limited </li></ul><ul><li>Carroll A. and Buchholtz A., 2006, International Students Edition, “Business and Society: Ethics and Stakeholder Management, Ohio, Thomson South-Western </li></ul><ul><li>Committee Encouraging Corporate Philanthropy (CECP), 2007, “Giving in Numbers, 2007 edition”, available at http://www.corporatephilanthropy.org/ accessed on 24/04/2008 </li></ul><ul><li>Crowther D. and Rayman-Bacchus L., 2004, “Perspectives on Corporate Social Responsibility”, Cornwall, MPG Books Ltd </li></ul><ul><li>Dodd (1932) seen in Green S., 1990, “Corporate Philanthropy and the Business Benefit: The Need for Clarity, Pace University available from http://digitalcommons.pace.edu/lawfaculty/439/ accessed on 24/04/2008 </li></ul>
    25. 25. References <ul><li>Frederick W., Post J., Davis K., 1992, Seventh edition, “Business and Society; Corporate strategy, public policy and ethics”, Singapore, McGraw-Hill Inc </li></ul><ul><li>Friedman M., 1970, “The Social Responsibility of Business is to Increase its Profits”, New York Times Magazine, September 13 </li></ul><ul><li>Green S., 1990, “Corporate Philanthropy and the Business Benefit: The Need for Clarity, Pace University available from http://digitalcommons.pace.edu/lawfaculty/439/ accessed on 24/04/2008 </li></ul><ul><li>Hsieh N H 2005, “Do multinational corporations have an ethical obligation to assist those in need, Knowledge@Wharton, Feb 23, 2005 http:// knowledge.wharton.upenn.edu/article.cfm?articleid =1140 </li></ul><ul><li>Leaders Magazine Inc., Jul-Sep 2007, “Investing in Society”, 30(3) available from http://www.leadersmag.com/issues/archive.html accessed on 30/04/08 </li></ul><ul><li>Mescon T. and Tilson D., 1987, “Corporate Philanthropy: A Strategic Approach to the Bottom Line”, California Management Review , 29(2), pg 49-61 </li></ul><ul><li>Mullins L., 2007, Eight Edition, “Management and Organisational Behaviour”, Harlow, Pearson Education Limited </li></ul>
    26. 26. References <ul><li>Smith C N 1994, “The new corporate philanthropy” Havard Business Review, May/June pp 105-115 </li></ul><ul><li>Porter M E and Krammer M R, (2002) “The competitive advantage of corporate philanthropy, Havard Business Review. </li></ul><ul><li>Sethi, S. Prakash 1981, Up against the corporate wall : modern corporations and social issues of the eighties,4 th edition, Prentice-Hall </li></ul><ul><li>Shaw B. and Post F., 1993, “A Moral Basis for Corporate Philanthropy”, Journal of Business Ethics , 12(10), pg 745-751 </li></ul><ul><li>Siefurt B., Morris S. and Bartkus B., 2003, “Comparing Big Givers and Small Givers: Financial Correlates of Corporate Philanthropy”, Journal of Business Ethics , 45(3), pg 195-211 </li></ul><ul><li>Vogel D., Summer 2005, “Is There a Market for Virtue? The Business Case for Corporate Social Responsibility”, California Management Review , 47(4), pg 19-45 </li></ul>
    27. 27. CP Matrix   [B1] Top givers in 1999 according to Council on Economic Priorities and Worth Magazine (2001) ? Oil and Gas Extensive 138.6 million 2006 Exxon Mobil ? Oil and Gas Humanitarian aid 106.7 million 2006 BP ? Bottled water industry Providing water for South African Communities Donates all profit to fund charity activities 2008 One Water Foundation ? Air travel Education centre’s in Malawi 6.3 million pounds 2007 British Airways ? Tobacco 144 youth smoking prevention programmes and 628 million trees planted 50 million 2006 B.A.T ? Retail Cash to local communities 270 million 2006 Wal-Mart Why give? Line of business Actual activities Giving's ($) Date Organisation
    28. 28. Exxon Mobil's giving's http://www.exxonmobil.com/Corporate/community_contributions_report.aspx
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