• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Acceptable Behaviour In England
 

Acceptable Behaviour In England

on

  • 3,773 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
3,773
Views on SlideShare
3,773
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
2
Downloads
148
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Acceptable Behaviour In England Acceptable Behaviour In England Document Transcript

    • Acceptable Behaviour in England The English are said to be reserved in manners, dress and speech. We are famous for our politeness, self-discipline and especially for our sense of humour. Basic politeness (please, thank you, excuse me) is expected. How to greet someone English people are quite reserved when greeting one another. A greeting can be a bright 'Hello' 'Hi' or 'Good morning', when you arrive at work or at school. text taken from and copyright of projcetbritain.com How to Greet someone in Britain The Handshake A handshake is the most common form of greeting among the English and British people and is customary when you are introduced to somebody new. The Kiss It is only when you meet friends, whom you haven't seen for a long time, that you would kiss the cheek of the opposite sex. In Britain one kiss is generally enough. Formal greetings The usual formal greeting is a 'How do you do?' and a firm handshake, but with a lighter touch between men and women. ‘How do you do?’ is a greeting not a question and the correct response is to repeat ‘How do you do?' You say this when shaking hands with someone. First person "How do you do?" Second person " How do you do?" 'How are you?' is a question and the most common and polite response is "I am fine thank you and you?"
    • First person "How are you?" Second person "I am fine thank you and you?" Nice to meet you – Nice to meet you too. (Often said whilst shaking hands) Delighted to meet you– Delighted to meet you too. Pleased to meet you – Pleased to meet you too. . Glad to meet you - Glad to meet you too Good Morning / Good Afternoon / Good Evening Informal greetings Hi - Hi or hello Morning / Afternoon / Evening ( We drop the word 'Good' in informal situations). How's you? - Fine thanks. You? Thank you / thanks / cheers We sometime say 'cheers' instead of thank you. You may hear 'cheers' said instead of 'good bye', what we are really saying is 'thanks and bye'. Terms of Endearment - Names we may call you You may be called by many different 'affectionate' names, according to which part of the England you are visiting. Do not be offended, this is quite normal. For example, you may be called dear, dearie, flower, love, chick, chuck, me duck, me duckie, mate, guv, son, ma'am, madam, miss, sir, or treacle, according to your sex, age and location. text taken from and copyright of projcetbritain.com Message from one of our visitors "In Staffordshire and the West Midlands both men and women use the term 'duck' when speaking to another person irrespective of their sex. I was quite shocked when I first arrived here in Staffordshire from London to be called 'Duck' by a man and now I find it very endearing and reassuring and far better than that awful term 'Mate'." Jim Staffordshire
    • Interesting Fact The 'affectionate' name 'duck' is thought to come from the Anglo-Saxon word 'ducis' which was meant as a term of respect; similar to the Middle English 'duc', 'duk' which denotes a leader, commander, general; from which comes the title 'Duke' and the Old French word 'ducheé' - the territory ruled by a Duke. Visiting people in their houses When being entertained at someone's home it is nice to take a gift for the host and hostess. A bottle of wine, bunch of flowers or chocolates are all acceptable. NB. Men should never wear hats inside buildings Time British people place considerable value on punctuality. If you agree to meet friends at three o'clock, you can bet that they'll be there just after three. Since Britons are so time conscious, the pace of life may seem very rushed. In Britain, people make great effort to arrive on time. It is often considered impolite to arrive even a few minutes late. If you are unable to keep an appointment, it is expected that you call the person you are meeting. Some general tips follow. You should arrive: * At the exact time specified – for dinner, lunch, or appointments with professors, doctors, and other professionals. * Any time during the hours specified for teas, receptions, and cocktail parties. * A few minutes early: for public meetings, plays, concerts, movies, sporting events, classes, church services, and weddings. If you are invited to someone's house for dinner at half past seven, they will expect you to be there on the dot. An invitation might state "7.30 for 8", in which case you should arrive no later than 7.50. However, if an invitation says "sharp", you must arrive in plenty of time. Invitations “ Drop in anytime” and “come see me soon” are idioms often used in social settings but seldom meant to be taken literally. It is wise to telephone before visiting someone at home. If you receive a written invitation to an
    • event that says “RSVP”, you should respond to let the person who sent the invitation know whether or not you plan to attend. Never accept an invitation unless you really plan to go. You may refuse by saying, “Thank you for inviting me, but I will not be able to come.” If, after accepting, you are unable to attend, be sure to tell those expecting you as far in advance as possible that you will not be there. Although it is not necessarily expected that you give a gift to your host, it is considered polite to do so, especially if you have been invited for a meal. Flowers, chocolate, or a small gift are all appropriate. A thank-you note or telephone call after the visit is also considered polite and is an appropriate means to express your appreciation for the invitation. Dress Everyday dress is appropriate for most visits to peoples' homes. You may want to dress more formally when attending a holiday dinner or cultural event, such as a concert or theatre performance. Introduction and Greeting It is proper to shake hands with everyone to whom you are introduced, both men and women. An appropriate response to an introduction is "Pleased to meet you". If you want to introduce yourself to someone, extend you hand for a handshake and say "Hello, I am....". Hugging is only for friends. Dining When you accept a dinner invitation, tell your host if you have any dietary restrictions. He or she will want to plan a meal that you can enjoy. The evening meal is the main meal of the day in most parts of Britain. Food may be served in one of several ways: "family style," by passing the serving plates from one to another around the dining table; "buffet style," with guests serving themselves at the buffet; and "serving style," with the host filling each plate and passing it to each person. Guests usually wait until everyone at their table has been served before they begin to eat. Food is eaten with a knife an Sending a thank you note is also considered appropriate.
    • Eating We eat continental style, with fork in the left hand and the knife in the right. Please note: We have mainly written about England, as that is the country within the UK where our students live. We would be very happy for schools and visitors to send us information we can add to our website on Wales and Scotland. What should I do or not do when I am eating in Britain? The British generally pay a lot of attention to good table manners. Even young children are expected to eat properly with knife and fork. We eat most of our food with cutlery. The foods we don't eat with a knife, fork or spoon include sandwiches, crisps, corn on the cob, and fruit. Things you should do: If you cannot eat a certain type of food or have some special needs, tell your host several days before the dinner party. If you are a guest, it is polite to wait until your host starts eating or indicates you should do so. It shows consideration. Always chew and swallow all the food in your mouth before taking more or taking a drink. You may eat chicken and pizza with your fingers if you are at a barbecue, finger buffet or very informal setting. Otherwise always use a knife and fork. Always say thank you when served something. It shows appreciation. When eating rolls, break off a piece of bread before buttering. Eating it whole looks tacky. On formal dining occasions it is good manners to take some butter from the butter dish with your bread knife and put it on your side plate (for the roll). Then butter pieces of the roll using this butter. This pevents the butter in the dish getting full of bread crumbs as it is passed around.
    • When you have finished eating, and to let others know that you have, place your knife and folk together, with the prongs (tines) on the fork facing upwards, on your plate. In a restaurant, it is normal to pay for your food by putting your money on the plate the bill comes on. Things you should not do: Never lick or put your knife in your mouth. It is impolite to start eating before everyone has been served unless your host says that you don't need to wait. Never chew with your mouth open. No one wants to see food being chewed or hearing it being chomped on. It is impolite to have your elbows on the table while you are eating. Don't reach over someone's plate for something, ask for the item to be passed. Never talk with food in your mouth. It is impolite to put too much food in your mouth. Never use your fingers to push food onto your spoon or fork. It is impolite to slurp your food or eat noisily. Never blow your nose on a napkin (serviette). Napkins are for dabbing your lips and only for that. Never take food from your neighbours plate. Never pick food out of your teeth with your fingernails.
    • Things that are ok to do: It is ok to pour your own drink when eating with other people, but it is more polite to offer pouring drinks to the people sitting on either side of you. It is ok to put milk and sugar in your tea and coffee or to drink them both without either. I am not used to eating with a knife and fork. What do I need to know? We eat continental style, with fork in the left hand and the knife in the right (or the other way round if you are left handed). At the top of your plate will be a dessert spoon and dessert fork. If you are eating at a formal dinner party, you will come across many knives and forks. Start with the utensils on the outside and work your way inward with each subsequent course How to eat with a knife and fork in England The fork is held in the left hand and the knife in the right. If you have a knife in one hand, it is wrong to have a fork in the other with the prongs (tines) pointed up. Hold your knife with the handle in your palm and your folk in the other hand with the prongs pointing downwards. How to hold a fork How to hold a knife When eating in formal situations, rest the fork and knife on the plate between mouthfuls, or for a break for conversation. If you put your knife down, you can turn your fork over. It's correct to change hands when you do this, too, so if you are right handed you would switch and eat with the fork in your right hand.
    • If it is your sole eating instrument, the fork should be held with the handle between the index finger and the thumb and resting on the side of your middle finger. How to eat Soup When eating soup, tip the bowl away from you and scoop the soup up with your spoon. Soup should always be taken (without slurping of course) from the side of the spoon, and not from the 'end' as in most of the rest of Europe. How to eat peas To be very polite, peas should be crushed onto the fork - a fork with the prongs pointing down. The best way is to have load the fork with something to which they will stick, such as potato or a soft vegetable that squashes easily onto the fork. It's sometimes easier to put down your knife and then switch your fork to the other hand, so you can shovel the peas against something else on the plate, thus ensuring they end up on your fork. How to eat pudding (desserts) To eat dessert, break the dessert with the spoon, one bite at a time. Push the food with the fork (optional) into the spoon. Eat from the spoon. (Fork in left hand; spoon in right.)
    • How to use a napkin or serviette The golden rule is that a napkin should never be used to blow your nose on. This is a definite no-no. Napkins should be placed across the lap - tucking them into your clothing may be considered 'common'. What do you say or do if you've accidentally taken too much food and you cannot possibly eat it all? Say: "I'm sorry, but it seems that 'my eyes are bigger than my stomach'. or "I'm sorry. It was so delicious but I am full". The main thing is not to offend your host Manners are Important DOs and DON'TS (Taboos) in England In England... Do stand in line: In England we like to form orderly queues (standing in line) and wait patiently for our turn e.g. boarding a bus. It is usual to queue when required, and expected that you will take your correct turn and not push in front. 'Queue jumping' is frowned upon. text taken from and copyright of projcetbritain.com Do take your hat off when you go indoors (men only) It is impolite for men to wear hats indoors especially in churches. Nowadays, it is becoming more common to see men wearing hats indoors. However, this is still seen as being impolite, especially to the older generations. text taken from and copyright of projcetbritain.com Do say "Excuse Me": If someone is blocking your way and you would like them to move, say excuse me and they will move out of your way. text taken from and copyright of projcetbritain.com
    • Do Pay as you Go: Pay for drinks as you order them in pubs and other types of bars. Do say "Please" and "Thank you": It is very good manners to say "please" and "thank you". It is considered rude if you don't. You will notice in England that we say 'thank you' a lot. text taken from and copyright of projcetbritain.com Do cover your Mouth: When yawning or coughing always cover your mouth with your hand. Do Shake Hands: When you are first introduced to someone, shake their right hand with your own right hand. Do say sorry: If you accidentally bump into someone, say 'sorry'. They probably will too, even if it was your fault! This is a habit and can be seen as very amusing by an 'outsider'. Do Smile: A smiling face is a welcoming face. text taken from and copyright of projcetbritain.com Do Drive on the left side of the road In Britain, we drive on the left-hand side of the road, so the steering wheel is on the right. However the pedals are in the same position as in left- handed cars, with the accelerator (gas pedal) on the right. The gears and almost always the handbrake (parking brake) is operated with the left hand.
    • Most cars in Britain are manual cars i.e have a gear stick. Petrol Petrol (Gas) in Britain is one of the most expensive in the world. We pay on average 95 pence a litre. Minimum driving age in the UK The minimum age for driving a car in the UK is 17, and 16 for riding a moped or motorbike with a maximum engine capacity of 50cc. Roads There are some 225,000 miles (362,000 km) of roads in Britain. Many of the roads are built on the old roads laid down by the Romans centuries ago. Roads in Britain range from wide modern motorways down to narrow country lanes usually bordered by hedges, stone walls, grassy banks or ditches. Cities and towns tend to have compact streets because they date back to well before cars were invented, and were certainly not planned for large lorries (trucks).
    • In Britain, our three main roads are "M" roads, "A" roads, and "B" roads.  "M" roads are like American freeways. They are known as motorways and are fast roads. They have three or four lanes.  "A" roads are not controlled-access: they range from two-lane divided highways ("dual carraigeways") down to one-lane roads. They are the main routes between towns.  "B" roads are the smaller of the three. They may be in the open or have impentrable foliage right up to the road. Road markings (curves, etc.) may be sparse. M25 motorway Some motorways have tolls (pay a fee to drive) The first toll motorway, the M6 Toll, opened in December 2003 to ease motorway congestion in the West Midlands. The 43-kilometre expressway cuts journey times around Birmingham by an estimated 45 minutes.
    • What is the National Speed Limit for driving in the UK? All speed limits and distances, on signs, are given in miles or miles per hour. 1 mile is about 1.6 km. Round signs indicate speed limits with the limit amount circled by a red band. When the speed limit has stopped then there is a black line at an angle crossing over a white circle. Maximum speed limit in miles per National speed limits apply hour The National Speed limits  Motorways and dual carriage ways: 112km/h / 70mph  Unrestricted single carriageway roads: 96km/h / 60mph  Built up areas e.g. towns and villages: 48km/h / 30mph  Residential areas: 35km/h / 20mph The following national speed limits apply to all roads unless there are signs to indicate otherwise - all speeds are shown in MPH Type of Built-up Single Dual Motorways Vehicles Areas Carriageway Carriageway National Speed limits - unless you 30 60 70 70 are one of the following groups: Cars towing caravans & 30 50 60 60 trailers Buses and 30 50 60 70 Coaches
    • (Less than 12 meters long) Goods Vehicles (less than 30 50 60 70 7.5 tonnes max laden weight HGV's (more than 7.5 tonnes max 30 40 50 60 laden weight) Road Signs Road signs in Britain Roundabouts We have many roundabouts (taffic circles) in Britain. Traffic on the roundabouts have priority over cars coming onto the roundabout. There is a good animation on the following page to show you how to use a roudabout. www.2pass.co.uk/roundabout.htm Road sign
    • Do open doors for other people Men and women both hold open the door for each other. It depends on who goes through the door first. In England... Do not greet people with a kiss: We only kiss people who are close friends and relatives. Avoid talking loudly in public It is impolite to stare at anyone in public. Privacy is highly regarded. text taken from and copyright of projcetbritain.com Do not ask a lady her age It is considered impolite to ask a lady her age Do not pick your nose in public: We are disgusted by this. If your nostrils need de-bugging, use a handkerchief. Avoid doing gestures such as backslapping and hugging This is only done among close friends. text taken from and copyright of projcetbritain.com Do not spit. Spitting in the street is considered to be very bad mannered. Do not burp in public You may feel better by burping loudly after eating or drinking, but other people will not! If you can not stop a burp from bursting out, then cover your mouth with your hand and say 'excuse me' afterwards. Do not pass wind in public text taken from and copyright of projcetbritain.com Now how can we say this politely? Let's say that you want to pass wind. What do you do? Go somewhere private and let it out. If you accidentally pass wind in company say 'pardon me'.
    • Belinda sent sent us an email on the indelicate subject of 'passing wind' in public: "The expression 'pardon me' would be considered by the upper classes to be rather common. When I was growing up, I was told by my mother, at school and by my aunt who was a nanny to an aristocratic family that the correct thing to do if this happens is to carry on as if nothing's happened and for the entire company to ignore it completely as if they've never noticed. ( even if it's very obvious). I think young people nowadays would probably be more inclined to laugh it off but certainly the older generation in 'polite company' would never, ever draw attention to the incident by apologising. Basically the advice is say 'excuse me' for mouth burps, ignore bottom burps." It is impolite speak with your mouth full of food Do not ask personal or intimate questions We like our privacy. Please do not ask questions such as "How much money do you earn?" "How much do you weigh?" or "Why aren't you married?". text taken from and copyright of projcetbritain.com Never eat off a knife when having a meal. MEALS and MEAL TIMES Some people have their biggest meal in the middle of the day and some have it in the evening, but most people today have a small mid-day meal - usually sandwiches, and perhaps some crisps and some fruit. We have three main meals a day:  Breakfast - between 7:00 and 9:00,  Lunch - between 12:00 and 1:30 p.m.  Dinner (sometimes called Supper) - The main meal. Eaten anytime between 6:30 and 8:00 p.m. (Evening meal) Traditionally, and for some people still, the meals are called:  Breakfast - between 7:00 and 9:00,  Dinner (The main meal) - between 12:00 and 1:30 p.m.  Tea - anywhere from 5:30 at night to 6:30 p.m.
    • On Sundays the main meal of the day is often eaten at midday instead of in the evening. This meal usually is a Roast Dinner consisting of a roast meat, yorkshire pudding and two or three kinds of vegetables. BREAKFAST What is a typical English Breakfast? Most people around the world seem to think a typical English breakfast consists of eggs, bacon, sausages, fried bread, mushrooms and baked beans all washed down with a cup of coffee. Now-a-days, however, a typical English breakfast is more likely to be a bowl of cereals, a slice of toast, orange juice and a cup of coffee. Many people, especially children, in England will eat a bowl of cereal. They are made with different grains such as corn, wheat, oats etc. In the winter many people will eat "porridge" or boiled oats. What is the traditional English Breakfast? The traditional English breakfast consists of eggs, bacon, sausages, fried bread, baked beans and mushrooms. Even though not many people will eat this for breakfast today, it is always served in hotels and guest houses around Britain. The traditional English breakfast is called the 'Full English' and sometimes referred to as 'The Full English Fry-up'.
    • LUNCH What is a typical English lunch? Many children at school and adults at work will have a 'packed lunch'. This typically consists of a sandwich, a packet of crisps, a piece of fruit and a drink. The 'packed lunch' is kept in a plastic container. Sandwiches are also known as a 'butty' or 'sarnie' in some parts of the UK. My favourite sandwich is prawn and mayonnaise. I also love tuna and mayonnaise and ham and pickle sandwiches. Pubs sell food either in the bar area or in their restuarants. Light Meals Sandwiches Chicken and Bacon Club £5.25 Triple deck Toasted Brown Bloomer, stacked with Roast Chicken, Smoked Bacon, Lettuce, Tomato and Mayonnaise Steak and Onion Ciabatta £5.25 Prime Rump Steak, grilled and topped with sauteed onions served on a crisp light Ciabatta with a Salad Garnish Sausage and Onion Sandwich £4.25 Grilled Old English Pork Sausages with sauteed onions served in your choice of Brown or White Bloomer Bread Mature Cheddar and Chutney Sandwich £3.50 Mature Cheddar cheese and a Plum and Apple Chutney, served in your choice of Brown or White Bloomer Bread Jacket Potatoes £4.50 Served with a Side Salad Tuna Mayonnaise Cheese and Bacon Prawns with Seafood Sauce Brie and Red Onion
    • Chilli and Cheese Cheese and Coleslaw Add an Additional Filling £0.50 Omelettes Cooked to Order and Served with Chips and Salad or Beans Prawn Sausage Mushroom Bacon £4.50 Spanish Omelette Served with Sauté Potatoes and Salad £5.95 Extras Garlic Baguette £1.95 Chips, Curly Fries or Straw Fries £2.00 Topped with Cheese £2.75 Cheese and Bacon £3.00 Chilli and Cheese £3.05 Main Meals Starters Soup of the Day (see chalkboard) £3.50 A large selection of delicious home-made soups served with a freshly baked baguette Breaded Mushrooms £3.75 Deep fried and served with a garlic dip BBQ Spare Ribs £4.50 Crispy Coated Camembert £4.25 Deep fried and served with Cranberry sauce Chicken Yakatori £4.25 Tender skewers of chicken marinated in a Japanese Yakatori sauce Prawn Cocktail £4.25 Served in the traditional 60's way Garlic Bread £2.10 or topped with melted Mozzarella cheese 2.30
    • Main Course Fish Beer Battered Cod with Chips & Peas £7.95 Breaded Scampi with Garden Peas & Chips £7.95 Meat Steak and Kidney Pudding £8.75 A traditional English classic, prime steak and kidney in a suet case. Served with fresh vegetables, sauté potatoes and gravy. Steak and Guinness Pie With Mash £8.95 Tender Steak and Smoked Bacon slowly cooked in a rich Guinness gravy, with Puff Pastry lid and served wtih Seasonal Vegetables and creamy Mashed Potatoes Bangers & Mash £9.95 Three of the finest Cumberland pork sausages served with creamy mashed potato and a rice mushroom and onion gravy Gammon, Double Egg & Chips £7.95 Individual Lasagne with Garlic Bread £7.95 Lamb Henry £9.75 A large joint of shoulder of lamb, slow roasted with red wine and fresh garden mint Chilli Con Carne £6.50 With Rice, Sour Cream and Tortilla Chips Cheese and Bacon Burger with Chips £6.50 6oz 100% Beefburger, topped with Mature Cheddar Cheese and Crispy Bacon, served with a Salad Garnish and Chips Chicken Kiev £8.95 Breast of chicken stuffed with garlic butter, served with ratatouille and fries. Cholesterol Special £7.75 Home cooked ham or a Lincolnshire sausage with a fried egg, chips and peas or beans.
    • 8oz Rib-eye Steak and Chips £9.25 Pan fried to your preference, with Horseradish butter, Sauteed Mushrooms, Seared Cherry Tomatoes, Petit Pois and Chips Chasseur Chicken Supreme £8.75 Grilled Chicken Breast with Mashed potato and French Beans, topped with a rich Chasseaur Sauce Pasta Pasta Bake with garlic bread £7.75 Mediterranean vegetables and pasta cooked in a delicious wine, cream and ratatouille sauce, topped with melted Mozzarella cheese. Pasta Pepperoni or Chilli Beef £7.95 As for pasta bake but spiced up with pepperoni or chilli beef added. Vegetarian Cauliflower Cheese with garlic bread £7.75 Cooked in a mature cheddar sauce and then topped with Mozzarella cheese. Wild Mushroom Risotto £8.95 A medley of mushrooms and Arborio rice, in a white wine and cream sauce, with Wilted Rocket Leaves and Parmesan Cheese Egg 3 Egg omelette served with chips and salad garnish Cheese £3.75 Cheese and ham £4.00 Cheese and mushrooms £4.00 Cheese, ham and tomato £4.25 Cheese, ham and mushrooms £4.25
    • Learn about England and her culture from children who live there Week 1 Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Lamb & Beef Burger Roasted Sweet & Fish Fingers Apricot with Chicken Sour Pork Broccoli & Curry Peppercorn Legs Sneaky Pie Macaroni Cannelloni Sauce Jacket Filled Jacket with a with Chickpea Potatoes Potato Herby Crust Spinach and filled with topped with Napolitaine Lentils & Parmesan & Basil Savoury Cheese Penne Tomato Rice Filled Jacket Potato Boiled Rice Cream & Roast Brown Rice Chipped Garden Chive Potatoes Carrots & Potatoes Peas Potatoes Braised Red Swede Baked Broccoli Cabbage Beans Mixed Salad Mixed Salad Mixed Salad Mixed Salad Mixed Salad Hot Apple Cornflake Rhubarb Warm Ginger Turnovers & Tart Crunch & Bakewell Sponge Cream Raspberry Caramel Tart Pudding Pineapple & Rice Custard Fresh Fruit Cheese & Kiwi Slices Pudding Yoghurt Salad Biscuits
    • Pasta twirls Mince beef lasagna Week 2 Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Pepperoni & Chicken Roast Lamb Beef Stew Wholemeal Tomato Goulash with Mint with Breaded Pizza Tagliatelle Sauce Dumplings Cod Jacket with a Jacket Chunky Roasted Potato with Garlic, Herb Potato filled Vegetable Pepper & a & Bean with Soup with Feta Lattice vegetarian Sauce homemade French Filled Jacket Chilli Sauce Filled Jacket Coleslaw or Bread Potato or Tuna Potato Cheese & Filled Jacket Spring Potato Onion Potato Roast Braised Rice Boiled Rice Chipped Wedges Potatoes Boiled Mashed Potatoes Baton Medley of Cabbage Swede Sweetcorn Carrots Beans Mixed Salad Mixed Salad Mixed Salad Mixed Salad Mixed Salad Bread & Banana Loaf Viennese Butter with Hot Gooey Apple & Tart with Pudding Vanilla Chocolate Orange Duff Custard Slices of Sauce Pudding Yoghurt Fresh Fruit Oranges & Cheese & Yoghurt Salad Pears Grapes
    • Week 3 Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday French Beef Pork Roast Pork Spaghetti Homemade Stew Meatballs with Apple Bolognaise Fish Pie Crunchy with fresh Sauce Pumpkin Aubergine & Vegetable Tomato & Crunchy Goulash Pepper Pasta Bake Basil Sauce Jacket Filled Jacket Fettuccine Filled Jacket Potato Potatoes Potato Filled Jacket Potato Cakes with with Potato Creamy Courgettes Mushrooms & Tomato Filling Creamy Wholegrain Roast Boiled Rice Chipped Mashed Rice Potatoes Broccoli Potatoes Potatoes Braised Red Cauliflower Spears Garden Sliced Cabbage Cheese Peas & Carrots Sweetcorn Mixed Salad Mixed Salad Mixed Salad Mixed Salad Mixed Salad Apricot & Chocolate & Rich Bread Baked Yummy Sultana Orange & Butter Cinnamon Scrummy Crumble Sponge Pudding Rice Pancakes Fresh Fruit Tasty Trifle Selection of Cheese & with a Zesty Salad Treat Melon Slices Grapes Lemon Sauce Yoghurt DINNER The evening meal is usually called 'tea', 'dinner' or 'supper'. What is a traditional English Dinner? A typical British meal for dinner is "meat and two veg". We put hot brown gravy, (traditionally made from the juices of the roast meat, but more often today from a packet!) on the meat and usually the vegetables. One of the vegetables is almost always potatoes.
    • What is a typical English Dinner like today? The traditional meal is rarely eaten nowadays, apart from on Sundays. A recent survey found that most people in Britain eat curry! Rice or pasta dishes are now favoured as the 'British Dinner'. Vegetables grown in England, like potatoes, carrots, peas, cabbages and onions, are still very popular. The Sunday Roast Dinner Sunday lunch time is a typical time to eat the traditional Sunday Roast. Traditionally it consists of roast meat, (cooked in the oven for about two hours), two different kinds of vegetables and potatoes with a Yorkshire pudding. The most common joints are beef, lamb or pork; chicken is also popular.
    • Beef is eaten with hot white horseradish sauce, pork with sweet apple sauce and lamb with green mint sauce. Gravy is poured over the meat. Traditional Food Roast beef and Yorkshire pudding This is England's traditional Sunday lunch, which is a family affair. Recipe Yorkshire Pudding This dish is not usually eaten as a dessert like other puddings but instead as part of the main course or at a starter. Yorkshire pudding, made from flour, eggs and milk, is a sort of batter baked in the oven and usually moistened with gravy. The traditional way to eat a Yorkshire pudding is to have a large, flat one filled with gravy and vegetables as a starter of the meal. Then when the meal is over, any unused puddings should be served with jam or ice-cream as a dessert. Recipe
    • Toad-in-the-Hole (sausages covered in batter and roasted.) Similar to Yorkshire Pudding but with sausages placed in the batter before cooking. (See photo right) text taken from and copyright of projcetbritain.com Recipe Roast Meats ( cooked in the oven for about two hours) Typical meats for roasting are joints of beef, pork, lamb or a whole chicken. More rarely duck, goose, gammon, turkey or game are eaten. Traditional accompliments to roast meats With beef:  Horseradish sauce  English mustard  Yorkshire pudding  Gravy With mutton and lamb  Onion sauce  Red-currant jelly  Mint sauce  Savoury herb pudding With pork  Apple sauce  Pease Pudding  Roast apples
    • Sunday Roast Fish and chips Fish and chips Fish (cod, haddock, huss, plaice) deep fried in flour batter with chips (fried potatoes) dressed in malt vinegar. This is England's traditional take-away food or as US would say "to go". Fish and chips are not normally home cooked but bought at a fish and chip shop ("chippie" ) to eat on premises or as a "take away" Ploughman's Lunch This dish is served in Pubs. It consists of a piece of cheese, a bit of pickle and pickled onion, and a chunk of bread. text taken from and copyright of projcetbritain.com
    • Shepherds' Pie Made with minced lamb and vegetables topped with mashed potato) Recipe Cottage Pie (pictured right) Made with minced beef and vegetables topped with mashed potato. (Pictured right) Recipe Gammon Steak with egg (Gammon is ham) Lancashire Hotpot projetbritain.com A casserole of meat and vegetables topped with sliced potatoes. Recipe Pie and Mash with parsley liquor A very traditional East End London meal. The original pies were made with eels because at the time eels were a cheaper product than beef. About fifty years ago, mince beef pies replaced the eels and have now become the traditional pie and mash that people know. The traditional pie and mash doesn't come without its famous sauce known as liquor which is a curious shade of green and definitely non-alcoholic. The liquor tastes much nicer than it looks (it's bright green!). Jellied eels are also an East End delicacy often sold with pie and mash
    • Chicken Salad Bubble & Squeak Typically made from cold vegetables that have been left over from a previous meal, often the Sunday roast. The chief ingredients are potato and cabbage, but carrots, peas, brussels sprouts, and other vegetables can be added. The cold chopped vegetables (and cold chopped meat if used) are fried in a pan together with mashed potato until the mixture is well- cooked and brown on the sides. The name is a description of the action and sound made during the cooking process. Recipe English breakfast text taken from and copyright of projcetbritain.com Eggs, bacon, sausages, fried bread, mushrooms, baked beans A Full English Breakfast Bangers and Mash (mashed potatoes and sausages). Bangers are sausages in England. (The reason sausages were nicknamed bangers is that during wartime rationing they were so filled with water they often exploded when they were fried.)
    • Cornish Pastie with chips, baked beans and salad Black Pudding (Blood Pudding) Looks like a black sausage. It is made from dried pigs blood and fat). Eaten at breakfast time Recipe Black pudding recipes vary from region to region, some are more peppery and some are more fatty than others. text taken from and copyright of projcetbritain.com More information Bacon Roly-Poly (made with a suet pastry) Cumberland sausage This famous pork sausage is usually presented coiled up like a long rope Vegetables
    • Favourite Children Meals Three favourite meals with children are fish fingers and chips, pizza and baked beans on toast. English Puddings and Desserts What is a Pudding ? A pudding is the dessert course of a meal (`pud' is used informally). In England and the rest of the UK, we also use the words 'dessert, 'sweet'' and 'afters'. "What's for pudding?" "What's for afters?" "What's for dessert?" Take care! Not all our puddings are sweet puddings, some are eaten during the starter or main course like Yorkshire Pudding and Black Pudding. Puddings and Cakes in England There are hundreds of variations of sweet puddings in England, but each pudding begins with the same basic ingredients of milk, sugar, eggs, flour and butter and many involve fresh fruit such as raspberries or strawberries, custard, cream, and cakes. "......... a moment later the puddings appeared. Blocks of ice cream in every flavour you could think of, apple pies, treacle tarts, chocolate eclairs and jam doughnuts, trifle, strawberries, jelly, rice pudding ......" Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone, J. K. Rowling The more traditional and well known home-made puddings are apple or rhubarb crumble, bread and butter pudding, spotted dick and trifle. The traditional accompaniment is custard, known as crème anglaise (English sauce) to the French. The dishes are simple and traditional, with recipes passed on from generation to generation.
    • Favourite Puddings include: Spotted Dick (Also called Spotted Dog) Spotted dick is a steamed suet pudding containing dried fruit (usually currants), commonly served with either custard or butter and brown sugar Trifle Made with layers of sponge cake altternate with custard, jam or fruit and Whipped Cream. Sometimes alcohol-soaked sponge cake is used. Recipe Apple Crumble Often served with thick cream, ice cream or custard. Hasty Pudding A simple and quick (thus the name) steamed pudding of milk, flour, butter, eggs, and cinnamon. Bakewell pudding - also called Bakewell Tart.
    • Custard A thick, rich, sweet mixture made by gently cooking together egg yolks, sugar, milk or cream, and sometimes other flavorings. Most people today use a yellow powder mixed with milk, water and sugar. Custard can be served as a hot sauce, poured over adessert, or as a cold layer in, for example, a trifle. When it is cold, it 'sets' and becomes firm. Bread and butter pudding - old English favourite (see image) Semolina Pudding A smooth, creamy puddmade of milk, eggs, flavouring and sugaring. Semolina is cooked slowly in milk, sweetened with sugar and flavoured with vanilla and sometimes enriched with egg. Semolina pudding can be served with raisins, currants or sultanas stirred in or with a dollop of jam. Roly-poly A pudding made of jam or fruit rolled up in pastry dough and baked or steamed until soft. Treacle pudding A steamed pudding with a syrup topping. Jelly and Ice Cream
    • Cakes Lardy Cake The Victoria Sponge - Named after Queen Victoria Parkin A spicey cake combining oatmeal and ginger. Traditionally enjoyed around Guy Fawkes Night (November 5) Simnel Cake A traditional cake for Easter and Mothering Sunday (Mothers' Day) Other English Crumpets (pictured right) A tasty "muffin" that goes great with tea, and spread with butter and preserves. Mince Pies Pastry shells filled with mince meat, and sometimes brandy or rum. Traditionally eaten at Christmas time
    • Sample Pudding Menu Served in a Restaurant in England Apple and Plum Crumble with custard Served hot or cold with cream, custard or ice cream. Apple and Blackberry Crumble Served hot or cold with cream, custard or ice cream. Vanilla creme brulee with a Shrewsbury biscuit Lemon Meringue served cold with cream or ice cream. Strawberry cheesecake with strawberry sauce Bread & Butter Pudding served hot with custard Sticky toffee pudding with vannila ice cream toffee sauce Ice creams - strawberry and cream, vanilla, chocolate, rum and raisin and honeycomb Sorbets raspberry, lemon, blackcurrant, mandarin and apple Cheeses Stilton, Shropshire blue, Appleby's Cheshire and Mrs Kirkham's Smoked Lancashire cheeses served with celery, grapes and biscuits Afternoon Tea and High Tea in England AFTERNOON TEA (The traditional 4 o'clock tea) This is a small meal, not a drink. Traditionally it consists of tea (or coffee) served with either of the following: Freshly baked scones served with cream and jam (Known as a cream tea) Afternoon tea sandwiches - thinly sliced cucumber
    • sandwiches with the crusts cut off. Assorted pastries Afternoon Tea today Afternoon tea is not common these days because most adults go out to work. However, you can still have Afternoon tea at the many tea rooms around England. Afternoon tea became popular about one hundred and fifty years ago, when rich ladies invited their friends to their houses for an afternoon cup of tea. They started offering their visitors sandwiches and cakes too. Soon everyone was enjoying Afternoon tea. text taken from and copyright of projcetbritain.com HIGH TEA (The traditional 6 o'clock tea) The British working population did not have Afternoon Tea. They had a meal about midday, and a meal after work, between five and seven o'clock. This meal was called 'high tea' or just 'tea'. (Today, most people refer to the evening meal as dinner or supper.) Traditionally eaten early evening, High tea was a substantial meal that combined delicious sweet foods, such as scones, cakes, buns or tea breads, with tempting savouries, such as cheese on toast, toasted crumpets, cold meats and pickles or poached eggs on toast. This meal is now often replaced with a supper due to people eating their main meal in the evenings rather than at midday. text taken from and copyright of projcetbritain.com Crumpets
    • Traditional Drinks in Britain Tea Britain is a tea-drinking nation. Every day we drink 165 million cups of the stuff and each year around 144 thousand tons of tea are imported. Tea in Britain is traditionally brewed in a warmed china teapot, adding one spoonful of tea per person and one for the pot. Most Britons like their tea strong and dark, but with a lot of milk. The traditional way of making tea is:  Boil some fresh cold water. (We use an electric kettle to boil water)  Put some hot water into the teapot to make it warm.  Pour the water away  Put one teaspoon of tea-leaves per person, and one extra tea-spoon, into the pot.  Pour boiling water onto the tea.  Leave for a few minutes.  Serve  Tea Words and phrases  Tea break, High tea, tea time, tea party, tea towel and many more terms have derived from the tradition of drinking tea.  Tea breaks are when tea and biscuits are served. The traditional time for tea breaks are at 11:00 am (Elevensee) and 4 pm in the afternoon.  If something is not quite to your taste, it’s probably 'not your cup of tea'. e.g. Windsurfing is not my cup of tea.  Coffee  Coffee is now as popular in Britain as tea is. People either drink it with milk or have it black and either have freshly- made coffee or instant coffee.  Bitter  Britain is also well known for its ale which tends to be dark in appearance and heavier than lager. It is known as "bitter"  Bitter is served in Pubs  Wine  Britain's wine industry is growing from strength to strength and we now have over 300 wine producers. A growing number of British vineyards are now producing sparkling white wine as well as full bodied red wine. There are over 100 vineyard in Kent.
    •  What is a pub?  The word pub is short for public house. There are over 60,000 pubs in the UK (53,000 in England and Wales, 5,200 in Scotland and 1,600 in Northern Ireland). One of the oldest pubs, Fighting Cocks in St. Albans, Herts, is located in a building that dates back to the eleventh century.   Pubs are popular social meeting places  Pubs are an important part of British life. People talk, eat, drink, meet their friends and relax there.  Inside a pub  Pubs often have two bars, one usually quieter than the other, many have a garden where people can sit in the summer. Children can go in pub gardens with their parents.
    •  Pub Bar  Groups of friends normally buy 'rounds' of drinks, where the person whose turn it is will buy drinks for all the members of the group. It is sometimes difficult to get served when pubs are busy: people do not queue, but the bar staff will usually try and serve those who have been waiting the longest at the bar first. If you spill a stranger's drink by accident, it is good manners (and prudent) to offer to buy another drink.  British Beer  Most pubs belong to a brewery (a company which makes beer) but sell many different kinds of beer, some on tap (from a big container under the bar) and some in bottles. The most popular kind of British beer is bitter, which is dark and served at room temperature (not hot, not cold). British beer is brewed from malt and hops.
    • Pint glass of Ale next to a half pint glass of Bitter Shandy  More popular today though is lager, which is lighter in colour and served cold. Guinness, a very dark, creamy kind of beer called a stout, is made in Ireland and is popular all over Britain.  In the West of England, cider made from apples, is very popular. Like wine, it is described as sweet or dry, but is drunk in beer glasses and can be stronger than beer.  Beers are served in "pints" for a large glass and "halves" for a smaller one.  Other Beers served  Most pubs offer a complete range of beers, local and imported, with German, Belgian and French beers being in demand.  Pubs sell soft drinks as well as alcohol  Although most people think pubs are places where people drink alcohol, pubs in fact sell soft drinks (non alcoholic) drinks too.  British people drink an average of 99.4 litres of beer every year. More than 80% of this beer is drunk in pubs and clubs.  Opening Hours  British pubs are required to have a licence, which is difficult to obtain, and allows the pub to operate for up to 24 hours. Most pubs are open from 11 to 11.  Pub Food  Nearly all pubs sell pub lunches. One of these is the Ploughman's Lunch which is a great wedge of Cheddar cheese, some bread, some
    • pickle, and an onion. Other typical pub foods are scampi (kind of shellfish) and chips (fried potatoes), pie and chips, and chicken and chips. Light Meals  Sandwiches  Chicken and Bacon Club £5.25 Triple deck Toasted Brown Bloomer, stacked with Roast Chicken, Smoked Bacon, Lettuce, Tomato and Mayonnaise  Steak and Onion Ciabatta £5.25 Prime Rump Steak, grilled and topped with sauteed onions served on a crisp light Ciabatta with a Salad Garnish  Sausage and Onion Sandwich £4.25 Grilled Old English Pork Sausages with sauteed onions served in your choice of Brown or White Bloomer Bread  Mature Cheddar and Chutney Sandwich £3.50 Mature Cheddar cheese and a Plum and Apple Chutney, served in your choice of Brown or White Bloomer Bread  Jacket Potatoes £4.50 Served with a Side Salad  Tuna Mayonnaise Cheese and Bacon Prawns with Seafood Sauce Brie and Red Onion Chilli and Cheese Cheese and Coleslaw  Add an Additional Filling £0.50  Omelettes Cooked to Order and Served with Chips and Salad or Beans  Prawn Sausage Mushroom Bacon £4.50 Spanish Omelette Served with Sauté Potatoes and Salad £5.95  Extras  Garlic Baguette £1.95 Chips, Curly Fries or Straw Fries £2.00 Topped with Cheese £2.75 Cheese and Bacon £3.00 Chilli and Cheese £3.05 Main Meals Starters  Soup of the Day (see chalkboard) £3.50 A large selection of delicious home-made soups served with a freshly baked baguette Breaded Mushrooms £3.75 Deep fried and served with a garlic dip
    • BBQ Spare Ribs £4.50 Crispy Coated Camembert £4.25 Deep fried and served with Cranberry sauce  Chicken Yakatori £4.25 Tender skewers of chicken marinated in a Japanese Yakatori sauce  Prawn Cocktail £4.25 Served in the traditional 60's way  Garlic Bread £2.10 or topped with melted Mozzarella cheese 2.30 Main Course  Fish  Beer Battered Cod with Chips & Peas £7.95  Breaded Scampi with Garden Peas & Chips £7.95  Meat  Steak and Kidney Pudding £8.75 A traditional English classic, prime steak and kidney in a suet case. Served with fresh vegetables, sauté potatoes and gravy.  Steak and Guinness Pie With Mash £8.95 Tender Steak and Smoked Bacon slowly cooked in a rich Guinness gravy, with Puff Pastry lid and served wtih Seasonal Vegetables and creamy Mashed Potatoes  Bangers & Mash £9.95 Three of the finest Cumberland pork sausages served with creamy mashed potato and a rice mushroom and onion gravy  Gammon, Double Egg & Chips £7.95  Individual Lasagne with Garlic Bread £7.95  Lamb Henry £9.75 A large joint of shoulder of lamb, slow roasted with red wine and fresh garden mint  Chilli Con Carne £6.50 With Rice, Sour Cream and Tortilla Chips  Cheese and Bacon Burger with Chips £6.50 6oz 100% Beefburger, topped with Mature Cheddar Cheese and Crispy Bacon, served with a Salad Garnish and Chips  Chicken Kiev £8.95 Breast of chicken stuffed with garlic butter, served with ratatouille and fries.  Cholesterol Special £7.75 Home cooked ham or a Lincolnshire sausage with a fried egg, chips and peas or beans.  8oz Rib-eye Steak and Chips £9.25 Pan fried to your preference, with Horseradish butter, Sauteed Mushrooms, Seared Cherry Tomatoes, Petit Pois and Chips
    •  Chasseur Chicken Supreme £8.75 Grilled Chicken Breast with Mashed potato and French Beans, topped with a rich Chasseaur Sauce  Pasta  Pasta Bake with garlic bread £7.75 Mediterranean vegetables and pasta cooked in a delicious wine, cream and ratatouille sauce, topped with melted Mozzarella cheese.  Pasta Pepperoni or Chilli Beef £7.95 As for pasta bake but spiced up with pepperoni or chilli beef added.  Vegetarian  Cauliflower Cheese with garlic bread £7.75 Cooked in a mature cheddar sauce and then topped with Mozzarella cheese.  Wild Mushroom Risotto £8.95 A medley of mushrooms and Arborio rice, in a white wine and cream sauce, with Wilted Rocket Leaves and Parmesan Cheese  Egg 3 Egg omelette served with chips and salad garnish Cheese £3.75 Cheese and ham £4.00 Cheese and mushrooms £4.00 Cheese, ham and tomato £4.25 Cheese, ham and mushrooms £4.25  Pub Names  Pubs have traditional names which date back over 600 years.  Some typical names are The Chequers, The White Swan, The Crown, The King's Arms, The Red Lion and The White Horse. People often refer to the pub by its name when giving directions:Turn left at the Rose and Crown. There is usually a sign outside the pub showing the pub's name with a picture.  Did you know? If a church has the name St. Mary's the nearest pub is traditionally called The Star.
    •  Games  Various games, especially darts, are common features of pubs; many of the old country pubs continue to promote traditional games, such as 'Bat and Trap' (played in Kent) which have been played for hundreds of years.  Licensing Laws  The legal age to purchase alcohol is 18. People aged 16 and 17, with the licensee's permission, may consume only 1 glass of wine, beer or cider with a table meal in specific areas of the premises, providing they're with an adult and the adult orders it (England & Wales only, Scotland no adult required to be present).  It is illegal to sell alcohol to someone who already appears drunk. You may not buy alcohol for a drunk person on licensed premises. All off-sales are advised to ask for photographic ID if the person looks under 21. Purchasing alcohol on behalf of a minor will result in an £80 on-the-spot fine.  Fourteen-year-olds may enter a pub unaccompanied by an adult if they order a meal. Children may enter a pub with their parents until 9 p.m., which lets families enjoy reasonably priced pub meals together, and allows pubs to continue in their traditional roles as community centers.  Legal age for drinking alcohol at home The legal age for drinking in one's home is 5 provided parental consent is given. Children under 5 must not be given alcohol unless under medical supervision in an emergency.  Customs  Customs in British pubs differ from those in American bars. In Britain, you must go to the bar to order drinks and food and pay for your purchase immediately, there is no table service. Bartenders are called "landlords" and "barmaids" and they do not expect frequent tipping. To tip a landlord or barmaid, it is customary to tell him to "would you like a drink yourself?"
    • Cheeses Cheese is enjoyed by over 98% of British households. Cheddar is a clear favourite, accounting for over 57% of the market, and is bought regularly by 94% of households. It is a hard cheese with a strong, nutty taste. Cheddar originates from a village in Somerset in western England, also famous for its gorge. There are six varieties of cheddar - mild, medium, mature, vintage, Farmhouse and West Country. Cheese varieties English people have a great love for cheese and over 400 varieties of cheese are produced in England. They all have have unique flavours and textures. The most common are the harder varieties such as Cheddar, Stilton, Red Leicester, Cheshire and Double Gloucester. Named after places Many cheeses are named after the place or area they are made. These cheeses include Caerphilly, Cheshire, Derby, Double Gloucester, Lancashire, Red Leicester, Stilton and Wensleydale. Speciallity cheeses Speciality cheeses include the Cornish Yarg, Shropshire Blue, Somerset Brie and Camembert.
    • Pies in England Pies are very popular in England. Pies are a baked dish consisting of a filling such as chopped meat or fruit enclosed in or covered with pastry ( a mixture of flour and butter). Favourite meat (savoury) pies include: Pork pie A pork pie consists of pork and pork jelly in a hot water crust pastry and is normally eaten cold. Recipe Steak and Kidney pie A traditional English dish consisting of a cooked mixture of chopped beef, kidneys, onions, mushrooms and beef stock. This mixture is placed in a pie or casserole dish, covered with a pastry crust and baked until crisp and brown.
    • Steak and Kidney Pie with chips and salad Cornish pastie / Cornish pasty A type of pie, originating in Cornwall, South West England. It is an oven-cooked pastry case traditionally filled with diced meat - nowadays beef mince (ground beef) or steak - potato, onion and swede. It has a semicircular shape, caused by folding a circular pastry sheet over the filling. One edge is crimped to form a seal. Cornish pastie in the days of the miners, used to be half savoury and half sweet, all wrapped in one piece of pastry. That way it was like a main course and dessert all in one. Cornish Pastie with chips, baked beans and salad Stargazy Pie Herrings are cooked whole in a pie. with their heads looking skyward and tails in the middle. Favourite fruit (sweet) pies include:  Apple pie
    •  Rhubarb pie,  Blackberry pie,  A mixture of fruits such as apple and rhubarb or apple and blackberry. World's Biggest Pie Every now and then the villagers of Denby Dale, near Huddersfield, Yorkshire bake the world's biggest meat and potato pie The first recorded making of a pie in the village was in 1788 to celebrate the recovery of King George III from mental illness. Since that time nine other pies have been baked, usually to coincide with a special event or to raise money for a local cause. The pie dish in the year 2000 weighed 12 tonnes and was 40ft long, 8ft wide and 3ft 8in deep, and the pie itself contained three tonnes of beef, half a tonne of potatoes and 22 gallons of John Snith's Best Bitter. It was transported into Pie Field on a 70ft waggon - and blessed by the Bishop of Wakefield Introduction to Christian Festivals Lent, Easter and Christmas are the main religious festivals of the Christian Year. Most people in Britain celebrate Christmas and Easter. School children have two weeks off school during Christmas and Easter. The Christian Year The Christian year is divided up with events which remind us of the life of Jesus. It begins with the season of Advent, at the very end of November, which is a period of preparation for the coming of Christ, and then moves through the story of his life to the important focus of Holy Week and Easter. After celebrating the resurrection of Jesus, the story focuses on the founding of the Church itself, with the coming of the Holy Spirit at Pentecost, before settling down for a period of teaching and consolidation of the faith during the weeks of Trinity. Some festivals, like Christmas Day, happen on the same date every year, while others move around within a range of dates. Why are some of the Christian festivals not on the same date each year? The reason is because the Christian Calendar grew out of two other Calendars, the Jewish and the Roman.
    • In their distant past, the Jews were a nomadic ( wandering) people. As they often travelled at night, the moon was of great importance to them, and they based their calendar on its phases. The first great Christian festivals sprang from Jewish ones. The Christian Church grew and expanded under the Roman Empire which followed a calendar controlled by the sun. When the church began to introduce festivals of its very own, not based on the Jews, they fixed them on dates already in the Roman Calendar. The Christian Calendar is thus a dual one, with 'fixed' feats based on the Roman 'solar' calendar, and 'moveable' ones based on the Jewish 'lunar' calendar. Easter Easter is the season in which Christians remember the death and resurrection of Jesus. It is the most important festival in the Christian year. Jesus' resurrection is at the centre of the Christian faith. Jesus died for the sins of humanity and by coming back to life promises eternal life for all those who believe in him. Easter is the story of Jesus' last days in Jerusalem before the death of Jesus. In England... Women in Britain are entitled to equal respect and status as men (and indeed vice versa) in all areas of life and tend to have more independence and responsibility than in some other cultures. Women are usually independent and accustomed to entering public places unaccompanied. It is usual for women to go out and about on their own as well as with friends. Men and women mix freely.  It is ok for women to eat alone in a restaurant.  It is ok for women to wander around on their own.  It is ok for women to drink beer.