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  • 1. U NIVERSITY OF C ALIFORNIA , D AVIS F IRE D EPARTMENT A NNUAL R EPORT 2007 MISSION STATEMENT The UC Davis Fire Department ensures the University’s primary mission of research, teaching, and public service is maintained by safeguarding lives, property, and the environment against the injurious effects of accidents, or uncontrolled panic, fire, hazardous materials releases, and natural disasters by maintaining an aggressive but efficient emergency response capability. Through a program of testing and inspecting built-in protection systems, and by maintaining strong and comprehensive fire prevention, code enforcement, and public education programs, the department seeks to prevent such uncontrolled hazards from occurring.
  • 2. Table of Contents Letter from the Chief ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 3 Organizational Chart ……………………………..…..……………………………………………………………………………………………. 4 Profile of Community Served ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 5 Year In Review …………………………………………………………………………………….………………………….………………………. 6-9 2007 Department Accomplishments ……………………………………………………………….…………………………………………. 10-11 2008 Goals by Division ………………………………………….…………………………………………………………………………………. 12 Personnel Profile …………………………………………………………..…………………………………………………………………………. 13-16 Operations Division Report …………………………...…………………………………………………………………………………………. 17 Apparatus Report ……………………………………………………………………….……………………………………………………………. 18 Aid Report ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 19 Strike Team Report ……………………………………………………………………….…………………………………………………………. 20 Prevention Division Report ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 21 Information Technology Division Report …………………………………………………….…….………………………………………. 22 Hazardous Materials Response Program ……………………………………………………..………………………..……………………. 23 Training Division Report ……………………………………………………….………………………………………………………..………. 24-25 Student Resident Firefighter Program Report ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 26 Public Relations and Public Education Summary ………………………………………………………………………………………… 27 2007 Graphs Incidents by Type …………………………………………………………..…………………………………………………………...……………. I Apparatus Response Summary …………………………………………………………………………………………………...……………… I Incidents by Alarm Hour ...………………………………………………………………………………..……………………………….…….. II Incidents by Month ………………..…………………………………………………………………………………………………….………….. II Summary of Fire Prevention Personnel Time Spent …………………………………………………………………………………….. III Fire Prevention Division Inspections ………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. III Fire Department Financial Summary ………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. IV Five-Year Comparison Graphs (2001-2007) Annual Call Volume ………………………………………………………………………………………...……………………………………… V Annual Incidents by Type …………………………………………………………………………………..………………………………………. V Medical Calls ………………………………………………………………………………………………..…………………………………………. VI Fire Calls …………………………………………………………………………………………………...……………………………………………. VI
  • 3. Letter from the Chief Department Chief Joseph Perry On behalf of the members of the UC Davis Fire Department, I am pleased to present the 2007 Annual Report. This is the first annual report produced by our department. I want to thank Assistant Chief Wes Arvin and Administra- tive Assistant Meghan Scannell for the many hours they have spent working on this document. In 2007, the members of the Department continuously sought ways to improve the Department, and the safety of all those that visit our campus. With the implementation of training programs, improvement to our fleet, work within our community, and successful staffing, our department continued to provide the highest quality emergency and non- emergency life safety services. Many achievements made in 2007 related directly to our emphasis on training. Personnel from both Operations and Prevention Divisions once again attended the Annual Yolo Wildland Training Burn, a joint exercise intended to increase coordination among fire departments throughout the region. Additionally, Operations personnel utilized cam- pus initiative “Be Smart About Safety” funding to attend Emergency Vehicle Operator Course (EVOC) training, which allowed personnel to practice defensive driving skills in a safe environment. During a major undergrounding project on Campus, funding was obtained to provide Trench Rescue training to our Operations personnel, the participants of which are now certified in trench rescue. Members of both Divisions benefitted from our department’s participation in a physical fitness program pro- vided by instructors at the UC Davis Activities and Recreation Center, aimed at improving cardiovascular strength and overall health. In response to changes becoming effective in 2008, Fire Prevention personnel received intensive training in the new state building and fire codes. These classes were opened to other Campus and Medical Center employees that work with the codes. Furthermore, Prevention personnel created and updated our Fire Nets to educate the Campus Com- munity on relevant policies and procedures. Internally, fire prevention training with the suppression crews was increased in order to improve the company inspection program on Campus. During the year we made several improvements to our fleet. We put three new command vehicles in service. The new Pierce engine was received, trained upon, and placed into service. Utilizing a county-wide grant, we were able to place mobile data computers in all emergency vehicles. The Fire Department continued to contribute to several Campus safety initiatives. We worked very closely with the Campus’ Emergency Manager to ensure that Campus personnel are properly trained to staff the EOC when activated. We worked with the Campus Safety Council to implement the Enhanced Life-Safety Program, which places AED units throughout the Campus. We continue to work with the Council on other campus-wide safety issues. In order to improve the workplace environment, several projects were completed within the station itself. The kitchen remodel was completed, and we completed the replacement of the Student Firefighters dormitory furniture. We said goodbye to the orange and yellow chairs when we replaced the dining room and training room furniture. One of the strengths of the Department is our support staff. Since the merger of the office staff and IT, our ef- fectiveness has increased. Our IT staff continues to make sure our software programs and computers are updates. The Firehouse/Visionair Interface was finally completed. We are fortunate to have great employees. We hired Inspector James Patterson, Inspector Greg Paul, Adminis- trative Assistants Kim Stephens and Melissa Vink, and Computer Specialist Tyler Randles. Laura Hornbuckle moved from Administrative Assistant to Inspector. We hired Firefighters David Anderson, Mike Jones, and Nathan Potter. Ben Rizzo moved from Inspector to Firefighter. Engineer Cess Mercado spent 2007 serving in Iraq and was always in our thoughts. In closing, I want to congratulate two of our employees. Captain Jan McNown retired at the end of October. Engineer Terry Zimmer completed his 30th year with the Fire Department in June. Thank you Terry for your continuing contribution to the Fire Department.
  • 4. Organizational Chart
  • 5. Community Served Community Statistics Campus Land Area 5,300 acres Population (in 2007) 60,771 Students 30,685 Undergraduate 23,449 Graduate 4,094 Professional 3,092 Employees 30,086 Academic 8,383 Staff 21,763 The University of California, Davis, makes a difference in the lives of people every day. Fueled by learning and energized by discovery, the UC Davis tradition of engage- ment with the local community, the nation and the world guides all that it does. The university’s commitment to providing a rigorous, attentive and research-enriched edu- cation creates a supportive learning environment for both students and faculty. UC Davis is a pioneer in interdisciplinary problem-solving, and its four colleges, five pro- fessional schools, more than 100 academic majors and 86 graduate programs provide a comprehensive learning environment for students, faculty and researchers.
  • 6. Year In Review January March UC Davis Enhanced Life-Saving Program – An im- EMS Call – Personnel responded to a barn on campus plementation of collaboration between the Fire Chief for a patient who suffered a fall from the hay loft onto a and the campus’ Medical Director, the Enhanced Life- concrete floor. Upon arrival, firefighters placed the pa- Saving Program began in an effort to strategically posi- tient in c-spine immobilization to prevent any further tion Automated External Defibrillators (AEDs) aggravation of any existing spinal injuries. In a coordi- throughout the campus community. To date, more than nated effort, AMR and UCDFD personnel prepared the 25 units have been placed in facilities with trained per- patient for transport to a nearby hospital. sonnel, both within the core campus as well as within UC Davis research facilities throughout the state. April Picnic Day – Despite the rainy weather, the UC Davis Second Alarm Structure Fire – City of Davis – community held yet another successful annual Picnic UCDFD provided Truck 34 and Engine 34 to assist at a Day. There were demonstrations by many departments second alarm house fire within the City of Davis. Crews and campus organizations, including the Fire Depart- secured utilities, provided exposure protection, ventila- ment. Station 34 featured visits from Sparky the Fire tion, debris removal, overhaul, and mop-up. Dog and Pluggie, the robotic fire hydrant. We also had a visit from a REACH air ambulance helicopter, which February allowed visitors to speak with the crew and explore the helicopter. Balloons and plastic fire hats were perennial Extrication from Motor Vehicle Crash – West Cam- favorites with the children and University students pus – Two UC Davis engine companies responded to alike. the scene of a vehicle accident requiring extrication. The t-bone collision involved two victims, one of which May required extrication from their vehicle. After stabilizing the vehicle, which was positioned on its side on the Residential Structure Fire –City of Davis – UCDFD hood of the second vehicle, crews removed the driver’s Truck 34 responded to a structure fire within the City of side door and extricated the patient, who was then pre- Davis. The first-in engine reported visible smoke and pared for transport to the hospital. flames coming from a second-story apartment. Truck company personnel provided roof ventilation, and worked with City of Davis crews to complete salvage Second Alarm Structure Fire –Mrak Hall – With aid and overhaul, minimizing further damage to the apart- from the City of Davis and Dixon Fire Departments, ment and surrounding units. UCDFD personnel responded to a report of visible smoke and flames within Mrak Hall, one of the Univer- sity’s primary administrative buildings. Upon arrival, crews determined that the fire was confined to one of- fice. UCDFD Engine 234 and City of Davis crews ex- tinguished the fire, while a second UCDFD crew and Dixon Fire provided ventilation. The fire was investi- gated, and the cause was determined to be an electrical malfunction in a desk-top style fan, which had been used to cool the computer server within the room.
  • 7. Year In Review Second Alarm Vegetation Fire – South Campus – June Two UC Davis Fire Department engine companies, two Assistant Chiefs, and a department pickup truck re- Fourth Alarm Vegetation Fire – Dixon – Two engine sponded to a grass fire along Levee Road in the South companies from UC Davis responded to a fourth alarm portion of the University campus. With smoke visible grass fire in Solano County to provide structure protec- from the nearby freeways, and flames threatening the tion, successfully defending three homes and one out- nearby train trestle, Engine 34 personnel struck a sec- building from encroaching flames. After being released, ond alarm. With aid from the Fire Departments of one of the two engines happened upon the scene of an- Woodland, West Plainfield, Dixon, and City of Davis, other fire, in which bystanders were attempting to ex- tinguish a farm equipment storage area with buckets of crews managed to overcome the windy conditions and water. Engine 234 extinguished the fire and provided extinguish the fire, none too soon. With mop up wind- mop up before returning home. ing down, neighboring crews were released in order to provide additional support for a grass fire in Woodland, Strike Team Response – South Lake Tahoe – The Of- visible from the South Campus incident. At the request fice of Emergency Services engine (OES 251), housed of Incident Commander Chief Reddish, UC Davis Fire and staffed by UC Davis Fire Department personnel, Department Student Firefighters rallied and assisted responded to a rapidly growing forest fire in the Tahoe with completion of mop up. National Forest. The fire burned more than 3,000 acres, destroying more than 250 homes and 75 businesses. Deployed for four days, our OES 251 crew was directly responsible for saving two homes from fire, as well as reducing damage to countless others. July Haz Mat Medical Aid – Haring Hall – Engine 34 per- sonnel responded to a report of a patient who had sus- tained a chemical burn from a liquid spill. Firefighters assisted the patient through the decontamination proc- ess, secured the scene of the incident to prevent further exposure, and alerted proper authorities to the incident. While Fire Department personnel briefed the emer- Third Alarm Vegetation Fire – Dixon – Two UC gency room personnel on the chemical in question, the Davis Fire Department engine companies provided patient was transported for further care. automatic aid to the Dixon Fire Department to battle a third-alarm grass fire and provide station coverage. En- EMS Call – Orchard Park – Fire Department personnel gine 34 assisted with continuing water supply and mop responded to a report of an infant not breathing. Upon up, while OES 251 (UCDFD’s Office of Emergency the arrival of emergency personnel, it was determined Services engine) provided coverage at Station 81 in that the infant had begun to breathe again, but required Dixon. Shortly after arriving, they were dispatched to a assistance. Oxygen was administered, and upon arrival vehicle rollover accident. Firefighters began patient of an ambulance, the infant was transported to the hos- care, and after arrival of the ambulance company, as- pital. A firefighter accompanied the infant to assist with sisted in preparing the patient for medical transport. oxygen administration during transport.
  • 8. Year In Review Laboratory Fire – Engineering Unit 3 – Fire Depart- Trench Rescue Training – UCDFD personnel partici- ment personnel responded to an activated manual pull pated in a multi-day training on trench rescue scenarios. station in a campus laboratory facility. Upon entry, Participants implemented newly-acquired skills in a Truck 34’s crew encountered smoke and attempted to trench dug specifically for purposes of this training. locate the source. Meanwhile, a researcher contacted Skills acquired include rescuer safety, victim extrica- Incident Command to explain the pull station activa- tion, and shoring using hydraulics and wood. tion, and to relay that the fire took place within a fume hood, and was showing 3-4’ flames. Upon locating the August fire, Truck 34 personnel noted that the fire had self- extinguished. It appeared as though the fire was caused Career Firefighter Academy Graduation – Four ca- by a hot plate and nearby plastic squeeze bottles, the reer firefighter recruits participated and successfully contents of which had heated in proximity to the hot completed our six-week internal firefighter academy. plate, and had been expelled onto the hot plate, causing the fire. Active Shooter Training – Fire Department personnel played a primary role in an active shooter exercise held Strike Team Response – Happy Camp – Assistant by the UC Davis Police Department. Training topics Chief Tod Reddish provided relief for the leader of the included personnel safety, victim extrication and medi- local government Type 3 strike team assigned to the cal care. Elk Complex in the Klamath National Forest. For four days Chief Reddish’s strike team worked the Little September Grider Fire. In total, the Elk Complex burned nearly 18,000 acres. EMS Call – Vet Med Teaching Hospital – UCDFD personnel responded to an unconscious victim of a fall Yolo Training Burn – A joint exercise for more than from a life-threatening height. A REACH air ambu- 20 Yolo County agencies, the 24th Annual Yolo Burn lance was called to transport the patient to the region’s was held in an effort to increase coordination between only Level 1 trauma center, the UC Davis Medical Cen- regional fire departments. Objectives of this training ter in Sacramento. included the following: improve command and control techniques through proper use of the Incident Com- Strike Team Response – San Bernardino County – mand System; provide command and control experi- OES 251 responded to the Butler II incident northwest ence; improve wildland firefighting skills using appara- of Big Bear in the San Bernardino National Forest. OES tus, tools and appliances; exercise accountability sys- 251 personnel provided structure protection and worked tem; and improve radio communications techniques and with a US Forest Service Hotshot crew to secure line discipline. and extinguish hot spots. The fire consumed more than 14,000 acres. Emergency Vehicle Operator Course (EVOC) – A two-part training course, EVOC training was provided to Operations Division personnel beginning in Septem- ber. Participants completed classroom training, pro- vided by Captain Jester and Engineers Weisser and Cherko, as well as a training session in the field. Through a grant secured from UC Davis’ Be Smart About Safety program, the Fire Department was able to provide personnel with the opportunity to learn driving techniques beneficial for emergency response.
  • 9. Year In Review October nia, landed in the middle of the Quad, and was available for tours. Training on the use of fire extinguishers was Haz Mat Call – Sciences Lab – On October 15, per- provided with the help of our Fire Extinguisher Techni- sonnel responded to a chemical exposure that occurred cian. Firefighters supplied a charged hose line and a during an academic laboratory exercise. Two students training dummy to provide the public insight into fire were splashed with a chemical solution requiring de- suppression. Prevention Division personnel distributed contamination. The students were immediately guided educational material and answered questions from the through a successful decontamination, during which the public. emergency showers were used. Water from the showers seeped through to the floor below, activating the fire Retirement – Captain Jan McNown retired after 3 alarm system. Truck 34’s crew assisted in the cleanup years as the Title 19 Captain in the Fire Prevention Di- by removing damaged ceiling tiles, and secured the premises until occupant safety upon reentry was en- vision. sured. November Southern California Wildfires Strike Team R e - SCBA Replacement Project – In an effort to achieve s p o n s e – UC Davis provided two crews of personnel compatibility with neighboring agencies, grant funding to staff OES 251 over the period of the Southern Cali- from both Yolo County OES and the Office of the Vice fornia Wildfires of 2007. After an initial response to the Chancellor of Administration allowed for the replace- Buckweed Incident in Los Angeles County, the crew ment of our InterSpiro SCBAs with Scott SCBAs. In was reassigned to the Witch and Poomacha Fires, the event that a firefighter exhausts their initial bottle at which merged together and burned more than 197,000 an incident, an exchange for a full bottle can now be acres in Ramona (San Diego County). After 13 days, a made with those of most neighboring agencies, allow- relief crew was sent to Southern California, where they ing the firefighter to rapidly return to their position, remained on the fire lines for an additional three days. maximizing resources. In total, the Witch/Poomacha fire destroyed more than 1,100 homes and 509 additional structures. A total of BSL 3 Training – In collaboration with personnel from 1,271 firefighters were assigned to battle the fire. Forty UC Davis’ Thurman Lab, UCDFD personnel took part firefighters sustained injuries, and two civilian deaths in a number of training scenarios held at the campus’ have been attributed to this fire. Thurman Lab, designated as a BSL 3 laboratory. Fire Department personnel received training on precautions Fire Department Day on the Quad – A department- of entry, providing appropriate medical care, decon- wide collaboration in recognition of National Fire Pre- tamination, and transport. vention Week, Fire Department Day on the Quad show- December Replacement Engine – On December 7, our depart- ment placed into service Engine 34. Our newest appara- tus is a 1750 GPM, 500 gallon capacity 2007 Pierce Pumper. Equipped with tools for fire suppression, res- cue, and emergency medical response, Engine 34 is our primary response vehicle, and is projected to respond to more than 800 emergency calls per year. EMS Call – Vet Med II – UCDFD personnel re- sponded to a victim of a fall from a life-threatening cased a number of exciting fire industry elements. height. A REACH air ambulance was called to trans- REACH 4, an air ambulance serving Northern Califor- port the patient to the region’s only Level 1 trauma cen- ter, the UC Davis Medical Center in Sacramento.
  • 10. Department Accomplishments 2007 Administration ♦ Participated on the Campus Emergency Planning Committee ♦ Participated on the Yolo County Avian Flu Task Force ♦ Conducted exit interviews ♦ Participated on the Campus Safety Council ♦ Converted storage space into office space ♦ Corrected recharge rates to our customers ♦ Presented a “Fire Department Day on the Quad” ♦ Completed the realignment of business operations ♦ Partnered with Unitrans to send a mechanic to the Fire Mechanics Academy ♦ Represented the campus on the Yolo County Emergency Medical Care Committee ♦ Participated on a Task Force working to improve the Major Capital Projects Process ♦ Worked closely with the Campus Safety Council to create a Campus Enhanced Life Safety Program ♦ Increased campus awareness of the Fire Department’s services by creating a committee and providing presen- tations Operations ♦ Participated in the rewrite of the Yolo County Hazardous Materials Response Plan ♦ Adopted some protocols and procedures of City of Davis to improve fireground effectiveness ♦ Secured grant funding to provide 3-day, hands-on, defensive driver training for all drivers of emergency equipment ♦ Participated in the annual Yolo Burn, a county-wide wildland fire training event ♦ Replaced one-half of the dormitory furniture for the student firefighters ♦ Utilized UCD Staff Development curriculum for employee development ♦ Worked with O&M, and EH&S to improve the air quality in our building ♦ Replaced kitchen and training room furniture ♦ Wrote specifications for, and ordered a new fire engine ♦ Pursued grant opportunities to replace breathing apparatus ♦ Increased the frequency of joint training with City of Davis ♦ Provided training for additional commercial driving trainers ♦ Successfully completed a firefighter recruitment for four firefighters ♦ Participated on the Planning Group for the Automatic-Aid training pro- gram
  • 11. Department Accomplishments 2007 Prevention ♦ Successfully recruited one administrative assistant and two fire inspectors ♦ Completed the ordering and equipment installation for the three new command vehicles from Fleet ♦ Participated with other campus departments on preparing to utilize the new codes ♦ Continued to serve on the committee charges with developing a sprinkler system retrofit policy for the exist- ing buildings on campus ♦ Completed the installation of the 800 mhz radio system ♦ Continued to develop Informational Bulletins/Fire Nets to assist our customers ♦ Provided prevention training to line personnel 8 out of 12 months ♦ Participated in the Major Capital Projects Process Improvement ♦ Developed a regulatory compliance package for approval by VC Nosek ♦ Analyzed workload equity and made adjustments where possible ♦ Provided training opportunities on the new California Codes ♦ Completed the development of the pre-fire planning program ♦ Completed recruitment for Fire Specialist II Inspector ♦ Completed the inspection responsibility matrix ♦ Developed additional Fire Nets ♦ Chaired the Campus Fire Alarm Committee Information Technology ♦ Completed Firehouse – Vision AIR Interface ♦ Received DOJ approval for CLETS upgrade ♦ Completed updating the Police Department website ♦ Completed a Police Department network inventory ♦ Upgraded the Phoenix software program ♦ Upgraded the Dictaphone system ♦ Completed a computer replacement schedule ♦ Completed Police Department Active Directory migration ♦ Trained fire department personnel on the use of the e-fax account on Haz Mat 34 ♦ Completed installation of remote field tech access module on the Phoenix system ♦ Successfully recruited a Computer Resource Specialist II
  • 12. 2008 Goals by Division Administration ♦ Participate on the Task Force to improve the Major Capital Projects process ♦ Participate on the Campus Safety Council ♦ Participate on the Campus Emergency Planning Committee ♦ Represent the campus at the Yolo County Emergency Medical Care Committee ♦ Participate on the Yolo County Avian Flu Task Force ♦ Develop a building numbering system for the campus ♦ Develop a comprehensive annual report for the entire department ♦ Replace the student firefighter’s dormitory furniture ♦ Complete the upstairs bathroom remodel Operations ♦ Complete the purchase, installation, and training on mobile data computers ♦ Continue to update operational policies and procedures ♦ Continue to coordinate training opportunities with our auto-aid partners ♦ Update minimum qualifications for career development ♦ Continue to develop our training program for operations and prevention personnel ♦ Utilize UCD Staff Development curriculum for employee development ♦ Develop and publish an annual training calendar ♦ Continue to develop lesson plans and company evolutions ♦ Update the Injury and Illness Prevention Program ♦ Complete the training room upgrades Prevention ♦ Complete the Fire Alarm Master Planning Scoping Study ♦ Develop a monthly training schedule ♦ Increase campus awareness by increasing interaction with the media ♦ Provide public service announcements for campus radio station ♦ Develop position manuals for each Fire Prevention position Information Technology ♦ Complete update of Fire Department website ♦ Update licensing agreements ♦ Complete network configuration for CLETS ♦ Purchase server to store offsite data for the Medical Center ♦ Establish remote access capability for senior staff ♦ Replace one half of Fire Department computers ♦ Replace CAD and RMS servers and provide for redundancy ♦ Provide support and oversight for the Fire Department Mobile Data program ♦ Provide training opportunities on SQL, Cisco routers, security, and Visual Basic
  • 13. Suppression Personnel A Shift • Captain Kim Jester • Captain Nate Hartinger • Engineer David Dean • Engineer Cess Mercado • Acting Engineer Jen Nilsson • Firefighter Joe Newman • Firefighter Scott Meyer • Firefighter Ben Rizzo B Shift • Captain Dave Stiles • Captain Steve Dunn • Engineer Terry Weisser • Acting Engineer John Hodge • Firefighter Scott Hatcher • Firefighter David Anderson • Firefighter Mike Jones C Shift • Captain Shawn Cullen • Captain Paul Fullerton • Engineer Louie Cherko • Engineer Gina Updegraff • Firefighter Jon Poganski • Firefighter Nate Potter
  • 14. Personnel Achievements New Hires • Firefighter Ben Rizzo • Firefighter David Anderson • Firefighter Nate Potter • Firefighter Mike Jones • Captain James Patterson • Inspector Greg Paul • Inspector Laura Hornbuckle • Computer Resource Specialist Tyler Randles • Administrative Assistant Kim Stephens Awards • Firefighter of the Year • Louie Cherko (Suppression) • David Anderson (SRFF) • Citizens Appreciation Award • Marc Hicks • 30 Year Service Award • Terry Zimmer (Suppression) Retirements • Jan McNown • Title 19 Captain, Prevention
  • 15. Personnel Highlight UC DAVIS FIREFIGHTER DEPLOYED TO SERVE IN IRAQ By MILES DUNCAN Aggie Features Writer Local fire engineer Cesilio “Cess” Mercado has long held the responsibility of serving the UC Davis community, working for the UC Davis Fire Department for the past eight years. But with the new year, the 28-year-old reservist will assume a new responsibility: serving his country and colleagues overseas in Iraq. Mercado, who has been a member of the U.S. Army Reserve for the past nine years, will begin his year-and-a-half deployment in the war-torn country tomorrow, when he will board a plane bound for Iraq. Though he has been told he is headed for Baghdad, Iraq’s capital, he is unsure where he will end up or what to expect. “It’s a big question mark, and I’m eager but at the same time really nervous about the new experience,” he said. To fulfill his reserve duties, Mercado has spent the last several years training medics in the Army. However, once in Iraq, he will use that medical expertise to treat rather than teach. “This task force that I’m a part of now has been assigned to deploy and go train [the] Iraqi army and police in Iraq,” he said. “I won’t be actually training. I’ve been assigned to go be a medic for them.” The Dixon, Calif. native joined the Army after high school and realized he wanted to be a medic shortly thereafter. “I think I was just sick of school, wanted a different outlook on life, so I waited a year and then joined up with the army,” he said. “It got me interested in the emergency medical field, which got me interested in the fire service.” Soon after, he enrolled as an undergraduate at UC Davis, waiting only one year until applying for the UCDFD student firefighter program. Hired as a sophomore in 1999, Mercado continued as a student firefighter for the next three years, earning a full-time job as a UCDFD fire engineer just two weeks after graduating with a bachelor’s degree in exercise biology. While studying and working on campus, Mercado also spent weekends at a combat support hospital in Oakland as part of his re- serve duty. Mercado said the experience and his ongoing work for the UCDFD have prepared him for his task in Iraq. “The biggest asset a medic has is being able to communicate with injured people,” he said. “So just being able to go out day to day and go on these medical calls and help people, I think, is a great advantage for when I get there.” Facing an equally difficult transition are Mercado’s wife, Kara, and their two-year-old daughter, Abigail. “My daughter, who doesn’t quite understand why I’m leaving, I think she’ll find it difficult,” he said. “Obviously my wife is going to miss me a little bit, because it’s going to be hard for her to just be a single parent for that time while I’m away.” Mercado said he felt fortunate to be notified of his deployment in late October, because it has given his family time to accept that he is going to be “gone for a while,” he said. While in Iraq, he plans to keep in touch by e-mail and by phone whenever possible. Mercado won’t only be missed by his wife and daughter, but by his firefighting family as well. UCDFD held a luncheon for the departing firefighter Dec. 13, where his family and more than 50 colleagues joined in thanking him for his service with a standing ovation. An emotional UCDFD Fire Chief Joe Perry summed up the department’s gratitude with his share of kind words. “We’ve been very blessed to have Cess working with us,” Perry said. “He just has an exceptional work ethic, done a lot to improve the training not only of the students … but also us career folks. So we’re going to be missing him as he goes.” Mercado was thankful for the gesture and said he was already anticipating his return to duty for the UCDFD. “I definitely plan to come back,” he said. “And my deployment will be a year and a half, tentatively; they always have the authority to extend it if they need it. So June 2008, hopefully.” Article Courtesy of The California Aggie
  • 16. Chief Reddish Hired in May 2005, Assistant Chief Tod Reddish served as the Chief of Operations and Training Divisions. Thanks to his leadership and support, a number of significant goals and projects were accomplished during his tenure as Assistant Chief. Some of these accomplishments include the installation of Mobile Data Computers, the replacement of our SCBAs, completion of a fire- fighter recruitment, and procurement of grant funding for a defensive-driving training program. In December 2007, Chief Reddish left the UC Davis Fire Department to lead the Woodland Fire Department as their Fire Chief. While his leader- ship and personable demeanor are greatly missed by our department, his con- tinued role within the local fire community is sure to benefit the Woodland Fire Department and beyond.
  • 17. Operations Division Report Interim Assistant Chief C. Kim Jester The role of the Operations Division is to ensure the smooth operation of the Fire Department. This is accomplished by providing a safe and efficient work environment for all employees. The Operations Division strives to provide leader- ship and management that is fair, equitable and consistent. It assesses the needs and recommendations of fire depart- ment personnel and, when appropriate, implements positive change. The Operations Division is tasked with the respon- sibility of scheduling appropriate staffing for shifts and special events in order to ensure our workload and emergency responses are appropriately staffed to an acceptable level of risk. Some of the many completed tasks for 2007 include: • Hired four new career line firefighters, one of which is a former Senior Student Resident Firefighter and another is a former Prevention Division Inspector. • Delivered an in-house Recruit Academy that brought the new career firefighters up to a minimum level that al- lowed them to be Engine and Truck firefighters. • Handled/fulfilled Climate Survey needs/suggestions • Transitioned to 800 MHz radio system • Handled personnel issues in a manner that complies with the IAFF Memorandum of Understanding and Univer- sity and Fire Department policy • Purchased and placed into service a new Pierce Fire Engine • Successfully wrote grant to procure Scott-brand SCBAs • Enhanced response by installing Mobile Data Computers in 1st out apparatus and chief’s emergency response rigs • Participated in a Personal Trainer-led physical fitness program administered by the ARC in order to improve core strength and cardiovascular strength • Oversaw facilities maintenance and repair that included: • replacing antiquated hot water system • bathroom leak repair • Major HVAC Ductwork and station cleaning to reduce allergens for all employees The UC Davis Fire Department Operations Divi- sion is making full use of grants in order to en- hance the value and resources to the campus com- munity and county. We successfully authored a grant that enabled us, along with other county de- partments, to purchase Scott SCBAs, thus updating our equipment and affording a level of interopera- bility not before attained within the county.
  • 18. Apparatus Report Engine 34 Placed into service in 2007, Engine 34 is a Type-1 engine that provides an all-risk response to the 8.3 square miles of the UC Davis campus, as well as re- sponding to surrounding communities through mutual aid agreements. Engine 34 carries all the necessary equipment to perform structure and wildland fire sup- pression, emergency medical service, low-angle res- 2007 Pierce Pumper: 1750 GPM, 500 gallon cue, and vehicle extrication. capacity tank. In Service: December 2007 Haz Mat 34 A great asset to our community, Haz Mat 34 is the only vehicle in Yolo County equipped to provide a comprehensive response to a hazardous materials incident. This unit carries the equipment nec- essary to test, monitor, rescue victims, and mitigate many hazard- ous situations. Haz Mat 34 is a rolling Incident Command Center and carries equipment used for a confined-space rescue incident. 1994 Ford Chassis/Marion Body In Service: January 1995 Truck 34 Truck 34 is a rolling tool box. It carries equipment used for firefighting, heavy rescue operations, high- and low-angle rescue, as well as confined space. Truck 34 carries ground ladders ranging from 12’ to 35’, and is equipped with a 105’ aerial ladder, that can reach the roof of the tallest building on campus. Truck 34 re- sponds to all first alarm structure fires in the City of 2001 Aerial Innovations/Westates 105’ Tiller Quint In Service: May 2001 Davis. Engine 234 Engine 234 operates as a reserve engine for Station 34. Dur- ing large incidents, Engine 234 will be staffed by off-duty personnel. Engine 234 has a higher wheel-base then most Type-1 apparatus, and can be used for wildland fire suppres- sion activities. Engine 234 is also used when one of the other apparatus is down for maintenance. Engine 234 is fully 2002 HME/Westates Pumper: 1500 GPM, 750 equipped to provide all-risk response to most emergency gallon capacity tank. In Service: May 2002 situations.
  • 19. Aid Report The UC Davis Fire Department has both mutual and automatic aid agreements. The mutual aid agreement/plan works in conjunction with the State of California Master Mutual Aid Agreement to provide assistance to fire jurisdictions that need additional resources to manage emergencies that exceed the capability of the local agency. The plan is implemented when the local agency re- sources have been depleted to the point that additional resources are necessary to provide neces- sary protection for the jurisdiction. Mutual aid is defined as an agreement in which two or more parties agree to furnish resources and facili- ties and to render services to each and every other party of the agreement to prevent and combat any type of disaster or emergency. Automatic aid is de- fined as an obligatory form of mutual aid, based on a written or verbal agreement, whereby one or more fire agencies will provide immediate response of re- sources to an emergency incident within the jurisdic- tion of another fire agency. Typically, mutual aid is received only when requested, or when the level of response has elevated to include one of the participating agencies as pre-defined in established protocols (larger fires, multiple incidents, etc.). The participating agencies are only obligated to respond if they are able to do so. The Mutual Aid Plan includes a daily status of personnel and equipment that can be de- ployed as part of a Strike Team, Task Force, or Single Resource. In addition, the UC Davis Fire Department entered into a contract with the State Office of Emer- gency Services (OES) to house an OES fire engine (OES 251) at Station 34 and use as a reserve apparatus if needed. In return, the UC Davis Fire Department must provide the minimum staffing complement when called upon by OES and be enroute to the emergency within 30 minutes of noti- fication. During 2007 OES 251 was sent to the following emergencies by OES: Along with the two mutual aid agreements de- scribed above, the UC Davis Fire Department has an Automatic Aid Agreement with the City of Davis Fire Department. The Automatic Aid Agreement calls for UCD’s Truck 34 to be sent to the City of Davis for all First Alarm Structure Fires. In return, the City of Davis Fire Department sends an Engine company to UC Davis for any First Alarm structure fire on the campus. In 2007, the UC Davis Fire De- partment sent Truck 34 into the City of Davis 98 times and the City of Davis responded with an en- gine company onto the UC Davis campus 26 times. Participation in the Mutual and Automatic Aid Programs has strengthened UC Davis’ relationships with neighboring jurisdictions as well as State and Federal agencies. The benefits to the UC Davis community include on-the-job-training and experience that would not otherwise be available to UC Davis Fire personnel.
  • 20. Strike Team Participation In 2003, the UC Davis Fire Depart- ment entered into a contract with the State Office of Emergency Ser- vices (OES) to house an OES fire engine (OES 251) at Station 34 and use as a reserve apparatus if needed. In return, the UC Davis Fire Department must provide the minimum staffing complement when called upon by OES, and be en route to the emergency within 30 minutes of notification. During 2007, OES 251 was sent to the following emergencies by OES: ♦ Angora Fire ♦ OES 251 Response: June 25-28, 2007 ♦ 3,100 acres burned ♦ Butler II Incident ♦ OES 251 Response: September 15-20, 2007 ♦ 14,039 acres burned ♦ Southern California Wildfires ♦ assigned predominately to Witch Fire, San Diego ♦ OES 251 Initial Crew Response: October 21-November 2, 2007 ♦ OES 251 Relief Crew Response: November 1-4, 2007 ♦ 197,990 acres burned
  • 21. Prevention Division Report Assistant Chief Weston Arvin The Fire Department experienced a successful year in assisting the Davis Campus, UCDHS Campus and all other areas administered by UC Davis in preventing fires. Although the Davis Campus’ experienced 139 fires, there wasn’t an injury or death as a result of a fire. The Prevention Division utilizes the assistance of in-house staff at the UCDMC cam- pus and the Davis Campus-including Operations staff (line and student Firefighters). In addition, university staff such as Safety Coordinators and others are utilized to abate common hazards or contact Fire Preven- tion personnel for situations that require assistance. The fire prevention program has two primary components: The Title 19 staff (staff assigned to monitor existing facilities) and the Title 24 staff (staff assigned to conduct plan review and construction inspections). Other components include fire investiga- tion, public education, agency liaison, and support for licensing and accreditation. A high level of customer service is a constant objective of the Fire Prevention Division. The goal is to assist our customers while achieving an acceptable level of fire safety. Achieving both goals can be very challenging at times especially when cost becomes part of the equation. The Division strives to complete each construction project in conformance with the minimum codes in effect for the project while also meeting the fire and life safety campus standards applicable to the project. When it comes to existing facilities, prevention staff find the task of meeting minimum code requirements much more difficult due to many factors: age of the building, processes or procedures, customers operational needs, amount of hazardous materials, etc., etc. The Prevention Division works very closely with many campus departments (EH&S and Risk Management in particular) to effectively communicate and implement the fire and life safety requirements in a manner that doesn’t conflict with other safety requirements. Fire Prevention staff meet with two of our major customers (Architects and Engineers and Facilities Management) on a monthly basis to discuss important issues, problem solve current issues and follow up on maintenance and testing issues. We are cur- rently working very diligently with the Facilities Management department to bring the testing and maintenance of the campus’ fire protection systems into compliance with minimum regulatory requirements. With a change to the 2007 codes beginning January 1, 2008 the Prevention Division devised a strategy to assist staff in the tran- sition to the new model codes. The Prevention Division staff began attending training classes and seminars and started internal training in July every other week. Facilities, Design and Construction (FD&C), A&E and Facilities Management were invited to attend the training sessions. The training has proved to be very valuable in transitioning to the new codes. The new codes represent significant changes to California as they are based on a new model code (the International Codes). The previous model code used in California for the past 40 years were based on the Uniform Codes. The UCDMC Fire Prevention staff spent a considerable amount of time assisting the UCDMC campus in preparing for and passing their accreditation survey (occurs every three years). This was the first time the survey was unannounced which pre- sented some unique staffing challenges for the hospital. For the better part of the year, the Campus’ Title 19 Unit was understaffed. This was primarily due to one of the staff off on a work related injury and the only inspector took a position with the line as a Firefighter. By the end of the year both the Title 19 Captain and Inspector position were filled. The vacant Inspector position resulted in an internal promotion to Laura Hornbuckle who spent the previous ten years with the Fire Department in an administrative capacity. In addition, due to workload demands an additional Inspector position was added to the Title 19 Unit with the recruitment slated for the first two months of 2008. The Title 19 Unit is planning to spend much of 2008 organizing and prioritizing the workload, and rekindling relationships on cam- pus. As recommended in the 2006 Climate Survey, the department formed a Public Education Committee. Although in its infancy, the Pub Ed Committee is quickly getting its arms around many of the events the department participates in each year. Some of our goals include organizing the events, and capturing and documenting important logistical items for use the next time they occur. In addition, the committee has a folder on the Fire Server and put together public education kits for line staff to use dur- ing the many events they participate in.
  • 22. Information Technology Division Report Patrick Steiner, Division Head - Information Technology Prior to 2006, the UC Davis Fire Department’s Information Technology infra- structure was supported by Operations and Maintenance. In 2006, under the di- rection of Vice Chancellor Stan Nosek, IT support for both the Fire and Police departments became the responsibility of an IT department under the direction of the Fire Chief. This has proved to be a successful organizational structure, as the Fire and Police Departments have similar needs and reside in the same facility. The Fire Department’s IT group consists of a manager, one system administrator, one desktop support / web development person and two student assistants. The Fire Department’s IT unit hit the ground running with a large backload of existing projects and many new projects on the forefront. In the last year, Fire Department’s IT group has successfully completed the following projects: ♦ The setup of the Phoenix Remote Field Tech Access system. The Phoenix system is an alarm monitoring system. All alarm panels on campus and those at the Health System facility in Sacramento report to receivers in the dispatch center. These receivers report to the Phoenix system, which logs the reports into a database and sends notifications to the Phoenix workstations in the dispatch center. The dispatchers then acknowledge the alarm and take necessary action. During testing, the field techs must notify dispatch that they are testing a panel. The remote field tech access system will allow the field techs to access the system without disrupting dispatch. ♦ The upgrade and consolidation of the Fire and Police Departments’ internal networks in preparation for CLETS. CLETS stands for California Law Enforcement Telecommunications System. It is operated by the Department of Justice (DOJ.) A lengthy application process was successfully completed for approval of the network upgrade. Once approval was received, the entire network infrastructure for the police department was upgraded. This included new Cisco Adaptive Security Appliances (firewalls), new routers and switches. Access to CLETS is necessary for the Police Department to be able to query the state database for persons, vehicles, and stolen items. ♦ Upgrade of the Fire and Police workstations and servers. All the Fire and Police department workstations were upgraded to the latest Dell units. The Fire and Police departments’ servers were all upgraded to rack- mounted systems and placed in a new Dell rack. Hardware equipment replacement plans have been set in place for all the Fire and Police department workstations, servers, and networking equipment. ♦ Redesign of the departmental backup strategy. The old strategy involved using backup tapes and storing them in a fireproof safe in the Police Annex. This strategy involved weekly changing of tapes, and was error prone, at best. The new strategy involves backing up to Network Addressable Storage (NAS) devices both here and at the Health Center. This new strategy is a hands-off strategy that provides a month’s worth of backups with effective off-site storage. ♦ Upgrade of the Fire and Police web servers to Linux and redesign of the Fire and Police web sites. Both the websites have been redesigned using the Standard Campus Cascading Style Sheets. This gives the web sites a look that fits in with the rest of the campus web sites. The web servers were moved from Microsoft to Open BSD, which is a very secure system and is actually free. ♦ Install of the Tiscor Inventory Management program for fire extinguishers. The current Tiscor system was at the end of its life and only used for the Health Center. The new system is a much more robust enter- prise wide system which will allow use at the Health Center as well as campus. ♦ Upgrade of the Firehouse Records Management System to version 7. The Fire Department’s record man- agement was upgraded to the latest version available with no downtime.
  • 23. Haz Mat Response Program Interim Assistant Chief C. Kim Jester The goal of the UC Davis Fire Department Hazardous Material Response program is to prepare fire department person- nel for hazardous material incidents that have a potential of occurring at UC Davis and in surrounding jurisdictions to which we may be summoned. The University of California, Davis has set the standard of expert knowledge and certifi- cation at the Haz Mat Technician level. This level of response provides a high level of proficiency to assess and miti- gate hazardous material incidents at the local level. UC Davis Fire Department personnel receive at least annual re- fresher training as required by law, in order to maintain certification. In conjunction with UC Davis’ Office of Environmental Health & Safety, the Fire Department responds to hazardous material incidents, assesses the hazard, then takes steps to reduce the impact of the incident to people, the environment and property. The fire department is responsible for ensuring that all department emergency response personnel are able to: • Assess the scene of an incident, taking into account scene safety, and possess the ability to recognize a hazardous material situation • Use atmospheric monitoring equipment in order to set an Exclusion Zone, Contamination Reduction Zone, and Support Zone. In addition to setting appropriate zones, the company officer must be able to assess the victim’s survivability profile. • Employ hazard and risk assessment techniques, then apply them to a risk vs. gain decision-making process • Proficiently collect solid and liquid samples used for chemical hazard categorizing • Effectively utilize computer and hard-bound references in order to set appropriate exclusion zones and evacuation distances as well as direct Entry Team members in proper and effective means of assessing and mitigating the spill or leak • Determine the proper chemical protective barriers needed for both the Entry and Decon components • Be able to perform advanced confinement, containment and control operations. • Understand chemical properties and reactions in order to properly categorize chemical hazards • Set up and function with an appropriately constructed Incident Command System structure • Ensure proper notifications are made to appropriate local, state and federal agencies • In conjunction with UC Davis’ Office Environmental Health & Safety, determine if the occupancy or area is safe for re-occupancy. Some benefits of this level of proficiency are the safety afforded to students, faculty, staff and visitors to the UC Davis campus as well as reduced down time of critical infrastructure, services and instruction. The UC Davis Fire Department is making use of grants earmarked for Hazardous Material teams that have a possibility of responding to Weapons of Mass Destruction. This is an obvious enhancement to the value of the fire department as a resource to the campus community. The UC Davis Fire Department, in collaboration with fire departments from Davis, Dixon, West Sacramento and Woodland, and Yolo County Environmental Health and Safety, form a county-wide Hazardous Ma- terial Response Team. In the past, the Yolo County Hazardous Mate- rial Response team has responded to several incidents on the UC Davis campus, as well as Yolo and Solano counties.
  • 24. Training Division Interim Assistant Chief C. Kim Jester The role of the Training Division is to determine training priorities, schedule in-house training, organize specialized training and track the effectiveness of the program. Firehouse software is the application by which we track the hours we train and requires diligent record keeping. Observing firefighters in action is another method. It requires company officers to continuously evaluate their shift personnel and report needs and recommendations for training to the Train- ing Officer. The UC Davis Fire Department uses both methods in assessing our program and keeping it moving for- ward to meet the public’s needs in all of our calls for service. Allocating limited time to the many demands is a chal- lenge for our people, especially the company officers. Company officers are responsible for ensuring their crews are prepared for any task upon which they are called to per- form. The company officers are assisted by firefighters who acquire and maintain expert knowledge in various sub- jects, such as communications equipment, medical response, hazardous materials, driver training and testing, etc. The Training Division categorizes training into six basic topics (which coincide with our line firefighter responsibili- ties). They are: • Fire Prevention • Firefighting Operations • Technical Rescue • Emergency Medical Services (EMS) • Hazardous Material Response and Mitigation Our Firefighting Operations include all firefighting top- ics, such as apparatus operation, ladder usage, hose streams, wildland firefighting, strategy and tactics plan- ning, as well as firefighter safety. Technical Rescue in- cludes vehicle extrication, structural collapse, high and low angle rope systems, confined space rescue, and trench rescue. EMS requires monthly and annual re- fresher training and testing to maintain Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) certification. Our Hazardous Material training is aimed at maintaining all line personnel at the Haz Mat Technician level or above. This is done to provide superior service to the campus community as well as to comply with our contract with our Yolo County Emergency Response part- ners as the Entry Team component of the county- wide Haz Mat Response Team. Prevention train- ing includes those topics that both prove to be in- valuable to the campus as well as maintain the Des- ignated State Fire Marshal program requirements. These topics are generally addressed monthly. However, additional quarterly and annual drills, both in-house and with our Yolo and Solano Coun- ties Auto Aid Partners, are planned and executed.
  • 25. Training Division The UC Davis Fire Department Training Division is making full use of grants in order to enhance the value and resource to the campus community. There are two training opportunities in which we participated of which we are particularly proud. The first was the Trench Res- cue class that was hosted by the UC Davis Fire Depart- ment. All UC Davis emergency response personnel attended the class and attained the certification to per- form this difficult and dangerous technical rescue. The second was the Emergency Vehicle Operation Course (EVOC) at Mather Field. This class was also attended by all personnel that drive emergency vehicles. This two-day class has greatly enhanced the ability of all at- tendees to drive safely and competently. Everyone with whom we share the road are safer because of it. During the 2007 year, the UC Davis Fire Department administered a Career Firefighter Academy for four recruits. This intense six-week academy takes students through numerous technical and manipulative regimes that, at the end of the academy, produces personnel who are able to act as a probationary firefighter. After the academy, these students participate in in-house training that is designed to qualify them to function as engine company and truck company firefighters, receive their Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) class 2 license, become a Haz Mat 34 operator and finally, earn the qualification to drive a fire engine. In addition to the in-house training, these four firefighters must attend Office of the State Fire Marshal certification training that includes Haz Mat training to the Technician level, Rescue Systems I and Confined Space Rescue. The Office of the State Fire Marshal certification training alone equals 200 hours of training for each person. In 2007, emergency response personnel partici- pated in approximately 2144 hours of outside training, schools and seminars (at a cost of $40,391.58), and 5696.6 hours of in-house train- ing. In summary, 2007 was a successful and reward- ing year for the UC Davis Fire Department Train- ing Division. Our extra emphasis on safety train- ing is in keeping with a national push to reduce firefighter deaths and injuries. It is our goal to protect the lives of University employees, envi- ronment and property, while bringing all fire per- sonnel home safely.
  • 26. Student Resident Firefighter Program Interim Assistant Chief C. Kim Jester The UC Davis Fire Department is one of three universities in the nation to have a Student Resident Firefighter pro- gram. This rarified distinction is a point of pride for our department. A few of the many advantages this program pro- vides is the direct and invaluable link to the UC Davis student population as well as the inevitable influx of enthusiasm, dedication and pride in our organization that is refreshing. Our Student Resident Firefighter program is capable of employing 15 students. Each student has a single person room in which they may live full-time, as long as they are full-time UC Davis students and fulfill the contract they sign prior to moving into the station. In addition to having a room, the Student Resident Firefighters are able to use department kitchen, laundry facilities and living areas at the station. Student Resident Firefighters must work four (4) 14-hour shifts in the evening and one (1) 24-hour shift, plus attend seven hours of training per month for the privilege of living at Station 34. This arrangement is a benefit to the campus community as well. Often, when an off-duty Student Resident Firefighter is in the station, they respond to emergencies with the crew, which augments the career crew with a highly trained and motivated workforce. When this situation occurs, the Student Resident Firefighter that responds to the emergency gets paid. This arrangement is an incentive to the Student Resident Firefighter and a help to the responders as well as the campus community. When fully staffed, each of the department’s three shifts have five Student Resident Firefighters assigned to it. One of these Student Resident Firefighters assigned to each shift has earned the title and distinction of Senior Student Resident Firefighter. The Senior Student Resident Firefighter is responsible for maintaining a workable living arrangement and enforcing campus and fire department policy in the upstairs living area. During 2007, Student Resident Firefighters: ♦ Student Resident Firefighters responded a total of 997 times to a total of 674 emergency calls for service. (Note: There is often the opportunity for more than one SRFF to respond to the same call) ♦ Provided 3466 hours of work to the University. ♦ Participated in the following types of training: ♦ Fire (852 hours) ♦ Medical (119 hours) ♦ Haz Mat (150 hours) ♦ Driving (26 hours) ♦ University Policy (20 hours) ♦ Prevention (8 hours) ♦ Other (2 hours) In 2007, nine Student Resident Firefighters gradu- ated and moved on in their quest for happiness. One of the nine was hired by the UC Davis Fire Department and is currently a productive career firefighter. We hired and trained a group of Stu- dent Resident Firefighters to replace those whom had graduated.
  • 27. Public Education This past year found the UC Davis Fire Department placing a concerted effort on its fledgling Public Education Committee. The Pub Ed Committee was formed as a result of the 2006 Climate Survey (a survey sponsored by the Office of Administration on the UC Davis Campus). The com- mittee is made up of staff from Fire Prevention, Operations, Administration, and the FD’s IT Divi- sion. The committee meets once a month and places a heavy emphasis on coordinating upcoming public education events/opportunities. Accomplishments: • Developed a Public Education Kit for use by Line Firefighters when conducting a public edu- cation demonstration. • Conducted 24 fire station tours for preschool and primary school children. • Conducted 10 fire extinguisher demonstrations for campus staff and students. • In conjunction with National Fire Prevention Week, held our 2nd Annual Fire Department Day on the Quad on campus, and staffed an information and display table in the UCDMC Hospital Cafeteria. • Developed signs stating: Fire Department Train- ing for Your Safety. The signs are used by Line Firefighters to not only inform the public as to what is occurring but to also warn them to keep their distance during the training exercise. • Sent out a Holiday Fire Safety PSA to all staff, faculty and students at UC Davis and UCDMC. • Developed numerous articles for the new Safety Signals Newsletter, which is published by the Office of Administration for the UC Davis Campus. • Enhanced the Fire Department’s website. A new UCDFD website was launched in Fall 2008, containing more information, including Current News and Events. The website is constantly re- viewed for updated information. • Developed UCD Fire Department Trading Cards. They will go into production in 2008.
  • 28. 2007 Incident Response
  • 29. 2007 Incident Response
  • 30. Prevention Division Graphs Inspections and Plan Reviews UC Davis Campus (Davis) ♦ Building Inspections: ♦ By Prevention Personnel: 402 ♦ By Suppression Personnel: 156 ♦ Construction Inspections: 140 ♦ Plan Reviews: 690 Medical Center Campus (Sacramento) ♦ Building Inspections: 360 ♦ Construction Inspections: 336 ♦ Plan Reviews: 552 Summary of Time Spent by Prevention Personnel
  • 31. Financial Report
  • 32. Five-Year Comparison ANNUAL CALL VOLUME
  • 33. Five-Year Comparison MEDICAL AIDS FIRES
  • 34. UC Davis Fire Department University of California One Shields Avenue Davis, CA 95616 fire.ucdavis.edu