Social Fuel (Compressed   Web)
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Social Fuel (Compressed Web)

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  • A constant request to the NMA is a need for more insights on how different audiences read newspapers, how and where it fits into their lives and how advertisers can use this relationship. This presentation looks at the youth market 16-24 market. Some of the information comes from the public domain: TGI, NRS Census etc but most of our findings come from 2 research projects that the NMA commissioned – a mixture of qual and quant. RDSI undertook the qual have considerable knowledge of this market and who brought out heir own youth research earlier this year. The quant was through BMRB survey of 1000 16-24s. This, added a layer of quantitative analysis that, amongst other things, allowed us to put a number to many of the views expressed in the qual work.

Social Fuel (Compressed   Web) Social Fuel (Compressed Web) Presentation Transcript

  • Social fuel Newspapers and newspaper advertising in the lives of 16-24s
  • 16-24s make more first-time brand choices than at any other time in their lives first credit card… first car… first holiday without parents… first washing machine… first utility bill in their name… first newspaper they buy… first mortgage… first vacuum cleaner… first cheque account… first mobile phone contract under own name… first purchase of a lottery ticket… first own choice of washing powder… first electric drill… first general election vote… first bed… first ISP contract… first voluntary trip to IKEA… first disposable nappies… first purchase of toothpaste… first silk vinyl emulsion… first insurance… buy first drink in a bar… first choice of airline… first browse of the analgesics shelf… first choice of supermarket for main shop… first purchase of oven chips… first fill-up of petrol tank… first choice of coffee granules… first choice of career… first purchase from off-licence… first bet at the bookies… first bill at
  • 15-24 share of market Acquirers in last 12 months Current account: 49% Mortgage: 12% Credit cards: 10% Finance 15-24 share of market By volume Vodka : 36% Fast food: 31% Colas and fizzy drinks: 28% Drink & food 15-24 share of market Users of… Hairstyling mousse, gels etc : 39% Medicated creams, gels etc: 31% Shower gel: 19% Personal 15-24 share of market Buyers in last 12 months C omputer/video games & systems : 30% Cameras: 22% PCs: 20% Technology 15-24 share of market Buyers in last 12 months Fridges/freezers: 21% Washing machines: 19% Beds & furniture: 17% Home 15-24 share of market In last 12 months* Bought DVDs/CDs/Minidiscs*: 31% Pub customers (evening): 25% Holidays overseas*: 15% Leisure Source: TGI, base 15-24s/volume figures based on volumetric analysis View slide
  • Newspapers are a popular social activity 43% 46% 48% 46% 68% 73% 77% Night club once per month or more Visit bookshop in last 3 months DIY at home in last 12 months Visit the pub once per week or more Exhibition/outing in last 12 months Eat in restaurant in evening (ever) Regularly read a newspaper in last week Source: NRS, TGI, BMRB – regularly read a daily 3 times a week and a Sunday twice per month View slide
  • Newspapers are a popular media activity 81% like the fact that they can choose which ads to look at in a newspaper Media consumption across 7 days 16% 37% 59% 59% 67% 69% 77% 81% Visit cinema Watch Coronation Street Read a magazine Watch C4 Access the internet Watch ITV1 Read a newspaper Listen to commercial radio Sources: BMRB Quantitative Youth Research, July 2004 (sample 978), NRS, BARB, RAJAR, Nielsen, BMRB youth research read a daily 3 times a week, Sunday twice per month
  • Newspapers in their lives 76% say: my newspaper gives me my daily fix of news, gossip & entertainment Newspapers help 59% to keep up to date with what’s hot and what’s not 87% say: newspapers help me understand the important issues around me Newspapers provide 73% with a good source of information on latest music & films Newspapers spark 65% to think about issues , eg politics, environment and teenage pregnancy Newspapers give 73% interesting things to talk about with work-mates, friends & relatives Newspapers help 72% form their their own opinions by giving different views on issues Reading a newspaper helps 59% keep up to date with the latest celebrity gossip BMRB Quantitative Youth Research, July 2004 (sample 978)
  • Entertainment & stimulation
    • 16-24s are looking for stimulation during a natural break in the day: breakfast, lunch, just back work / school etc
      • Skimming for headlines, stories and pictures that provide entertainment / stimulation
      • Reading short, bite-sized, stories
    Adverts may benefit from a similar easy-on-the-eye format When I see big articles that take up a page or are heavy I just think naah Readership favours the Populars RDSI Qualitative Youth Research, June 2004
  • Social needs frame what stimulates and entertains Keeping up to speed: looks, music, reality TV Stories affecting me: teen murder, pregnancy, obesity Planning social lives: what’s on what’s hot, what’s not Feed dialogue: 7 year old bride, - short, extreme, human interest Hungry for more info: eg Big Brother, celebrities, gossip Newspapers provide social fuel RDSI Youth Research, June 2004
  • No problem with Becks’ kids or Big Brother. But who is the EU bloke? The EU President Their local MP Posh & Becks’ children Any 2 contestants in last Big Brother 73 73 44 18 Answers reflect what they want from their newspaper To keep them informed about things can become topics of conversation in their lives True of readers of both pops and qualities % confident they could answer correctly BMRB Quantitative Youth Research, July 2004 (sample 978)
  • Social fuel 86% women / 73% men enjoy sharing fun stories they have read with others 52% women / 32% men enjoy reading reading the problem pages out loud with my friends 73% say reading my newspaper provides me with interesting things to talk about with friends, relatives and work-mates BMRB Quantitative Youth Research, July 2004 (sample 978)
  • Strong emotional connections for men and women 32 59 67 67 73 52 85 87 83 86 I enjoy reading the problem pages out loud with my friends I value articles on health issues relating to people my age I enjoy reading human stories relating to people of my age I enjoy reading stories about others going through similar experiences to me I enjoy sharing fun stories I have read with others Men Women
  • Newspaper coverage of TV shows is high octane social fuel
    • Rich emotional context
      • Connected and up to date – personally & socially
      • Extra knowledge – to enjoy viewing more
      • Enjoy emotion of TV brand more + pleasure of build-ups and recap
    “ Friends are like part of the family – you’re interested in them” You get glimpses ahead If it says Big Brother on the front you go straight to that page Source: RDSI Group research, June 2004
  • TV shows have huge social currency, especially with women 45 56 40 56 67 69 72 79 I enjoy the build up to my favourite TV shows by reading stories in the newspaper I know I can get the background stories for reality TV shows I often read newspapers to catch up on gossip from TV shows I've missed I enjoy reading coverage of TV shows in my paper Men Women
  • More people read about Big Brother in newspapers than actually watch it on TV “ Without it (Big Brother articles) I’d feel like I wasn’t involved” 73% say: reading my newspaper provides me with interesting things to talk about with friends, relatives and work-mates
  • Newspapers reach out to 16-24s I LUST FOR MY SEXY TEACHER Dear Miriam, I HAVE a crush on my teacher. He’s single, dead good looking and a real laugh. When we met by accident in the pub at Christmas, he was a bit pissed. I gave him a Christmas kiss and as he pushed me away. he said something like, “Don’t – or I won’t be able to stop.” I’m 17, so would it really be such a sin? I think about getting him into bed all the time.
  • Popular topics (women) “Parts of the paper I usually choose to read” “ It makes you want it (Rimmel Massive Lashes), you see Kate Moss and you think I could be like that” “ I’d put the high street equivalents of what the celebs are wearing – that would make you want to go out and buy it ” 63 Entertainment, films etc 85 Celebs & gossip 64 Health pages 67 Human interest 68 National news 73 TV listings 68 Fashion & beauty 80 Coverage of favourite TV Women, 16-24 BMRB Quantitative Youth Research, July 2004 (sample 978) Source: RDSI Youth research, June 2004
  • Popular topics (men) “Parts of the paper I usually choose to read” “ This is a man’s section – that’s what attracts you to it” “ Being there and with that ad (KFC) gives them more of a sporting image” “ The films with ads make you think they are worth going to see” 52 Motoring and cars 76 Sport 54 Human interest stories 59 Coverage of favourite TV 61 TV listings 62 Entertainment, film etc 62 International news 66 National news Men, 16-24 BMRB Quantitative Youth Research, July 2004 (sample 978) Source: RDSI Youth research, June 2004
  • 16-24s spend time with their newspaper: approx half an hour & average 3 pick-ups Reading times are similar for Pops, Qualities & Mid-markets Weekend newspapers 35 minutes Weekday newspapers 28 minutes Source: BMRB Quantitative Youth Research, July 2004 (sample 978)
  • When are newspapers being read 49 36 25 50 38 22 28 In the evening Just home from school/ work/college Afternoon break Over lunch In a morning break Travelling to school/ work/college Over breakfast BMRB Quantitative Youth Research, July 2004 (sample 978)
  • Newspapers and advertising
  • How to successfully engage young adults through newspapers Editorial context can stimulate greater ad involvement & increase relevance of brand message Short, sharp, & witty style works best The ad should talk to me
  • Advertising is welcome They expect to be spoken to They credit advertising with influencing brand choices Advertised brands are deemed worthy of consideration Clever positioning is respected Sources: RDSI Group research, June 2004, BMRB Quantitative Youth Research, July 2004 (sample 978), ROAR Youth Research
  • Talk to me – I’m listening 71% I am more likely to notice the ads in the newspaper when they are aimed at me 39% If a company can afford to advertise in a national newspaper then it is probably more trustworthy 48% My mates and I will talk about the good or clever ads we have seen in newspapers 59% The films that advertise in newspapers make you think they are worth going to see 69% If an ad was related to an article or section I’d be more likely to read it 70% I like to look at ads for products that I might buy to get ideas and prices 81% I like the fact that I can choose which ads I look at in a newspaper BMRB Quantitative Youth Research, July 2004 (sample 978)
  • Reading newspapers comes with a “mood set” helpful to advertising 80% describe their mood as entertained 95% describe their mood as interested 80% describe their mind as switched on 47% describe their mood as stimulated 49% are open to ideas about what to buy or wear 89% describe their mood as relaxed BMRB Quantitative Youth Research, July 2004 (sample 978)
  • Moodset is “what am I going to do this evening?” “ Looking for a plan, options” “ Opportunity for ads that complement TV viewing” 56% say they are open to ideas about what to do in their spare time while reading a newspaper Sources: RDSI Group research, June 2004, BMRB Quantitative Youth Research, July 2004 (sample 978)
  • The “open to ideas” moodset is ideal for films “ The Day After Tomorrow one jumped out at me – it looks good” 59% agree: films that advertise in newspapers make you think they are worth going to see “ I look in the paper to see what films are coming out” Sources: RDSI Group research, June 2004, BMRB Quantitative Youth Research, July 2004 (sample 978)
  • In a “planning purchases” moodset, newspapers become a reference point for prices/features The T-mobile ad is good where they line all the phones up and you can see what they’re like 35% agree: newspapers provide me with detailed information on the latest mobile phones and tariffs Sources: RDSI Group research, June 2004, BMRB Quantitative Youth Research, July 2004 (sample 978)
  • Ads are seen in their context Interweaving ads with emotional and aspirational editorial gets attention Proximity to relevant editorial increases the relevance of the brand message to this advertising-aware audience Source: RDSI Group research, June 2004
  • Placing the danger rocks ad in I’m a Celebrity TV coverage makes it more noticeable to an ad-literate audience “It’s an excellent place to put it. I’m a Celebrity is all about challenges and pressure. They’re hot, they’re all together” “Goes together – makes you think about being cool under pressure” Source: RDSI Group research, June 2004
  • By linking into football in the sports section, Fiat has created a memorable campaign “When they say responsive steering to avoid relegation back door – really good, clever” “They did one like that for Manchester United.. and one for Arsenal as well I think” 48% say: my mates and I will talk about the good or clever ads we have seen in newspapers” Sources: RDSI Group research, June 2004, BMRB Quantitative Youth Research, July 2004 (sample 978)
  • The bringing together of Michael Owen and the sports section creates a transfer of identity and feel for Lucozade “ Lucozade Sport is about sport and performance which is what you read the sports section for” “ I always associate Lucozade with going to football” Source: RDSI Group research, June 2004
  • Which bikinis go with which body shape – I’d definitely read that, specially now before Summer. A healthy food ad next to it (Go Ahead) would make you look and want to eat that food rather than a chocolate bar Editorial gets attention and raises issues that make brand advertising work harder
  • You look at the clothes and the fashion sense of people in there 3am makes you think about what they’re wearing and the high street equivalents 3am ’s celebrity environment nudges thinking towards clothes and fashion Levi’s girl would go in 3am
  • Proximity to high interest topics can have a rub-off effect “ The Garnier ad is good next to Friends. You’d notice it and Joey, Ross & Chandler gel their hair” “You do notice how they have their hair” Source: RDSI Group research, June 2004
  • Women respond well to seeing their brands in celebrity sections It makes you want it, you see Kate Moss and the beautiful celebrities and you think I could be like that 3am is all about celebrities and that and it goes so well with Kate Moss – makes you want to look at it
  • The COI used a photo strip ad on The Star’s Just Jane page to talk about STDs Proximity to stories that create an emotional response can help Eg Problem pages for health messages 69% agree - if an ad is related to an article or section I’d be more likely to read it Sources: RDSI Group research, June 2004, BMRB Quantitative Youth Research, July 2004 (sample 978)
  • General news is seen as a good fit with ads that raise social and health issues Ads raising health & social issues are judged to require sensitive positioning – not in “lightweight” editorial, ie gossip or celebrities Source: RDSI Group research, June 2004
  • Newspapers in context
  • Newspapers are a more conscious activity “ When reading a magazine I tend to be in a more relaxed state of mind than when reading a newspaper” “ Newspapers provide you with a different perspective on news events that you watch on TV” “ When reading a newspaper I tend to be more actively seeking ideas and information to use that day than when reading a magazine” “ It takes more concentration to read a newspaper than watch TV” BMRB Quantitative Youth Research, July 2004 (sample 978)
  • Young people buy into the visual glamour of newspaper ads You have Mariah Carey and you think you’ll just take a look. The Triumph ad is next to it, where she looks a bit similar and glamorous, it works 16-24s see and feel aesthetic and emotional values of the medium they are in and the imagery works in this context
  • It is not the paper finish that matters but the ad and its environment “ That ad (Gillette) could be more effective in a newspaper than in a magazine… at the start of FHM they’ve got 10 pages of ads, you just flick straight through them “The texture of the paper doesn’t make any difference – it just works” Source: RDSI Group research, June 2004
  • Newspapers deliver top audiences every issue 28% 23% 5% 11% 17% 16-24 audience 2003/4 26% Michael Jackson interview 23% BB5 Final night Every issue 12% Radio Monthly reach 39% The Final 10% Every issue Every issue Consistent 15-24 audiences for ITV1 Top film 2003 Sources: BARB, NRS, RAJAR, CAVIAR
  • Summary Advertising literate and aware, 16-24s are quick to see connections between editorial environment and the ads The “newspaper mindset” is receptive to ads. Interweaving ads with emotional and aspirational editorial gets attention Newspapers entertain and stimulate and are used to “keep up” & for what’s on They are social fuel
  • End