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Vertical Scale Scores
Vertical Scale Scores
Vertical Scale Scores
Vertical Scale Scores
Vertical Scale Scores
Vertical Scale Scores
Vertical Scale Scores
Vertical Scale Scores
Vertical Scale Scores
Vertical Scale Scores
Vertical Scale Scores
Vertical Scale Scores
Vertical Scale Scores
Vertical Scale Scores
Vertical Scale Scores
Vertical Scale Scores
Vertical Scale Scores
Vertical Scale Scores
Vertical Scale Scores
Vertical Scale Scores
Vertical Scale Scores
Vertical Scale Scores
Vertical Scale Scores
Vertical Scale Scores
Vertical Scale Scores
Vertical Scale Scores
Vertical Scale Scores
Vertical Scale Scores
Vertical Scale Scores
Vertical Scale Scores
Vertical Scale Scores
Vertical Scale Scores
Vertical Scale Scores
Vertical Scale Scores
Vertical Scale Scores
Vertical Scale Scores
Vertical Scale Scores
Vertical Scale Scores
Vertical Scale Scores
Vertical Scale Scores
Vertical Scale Scores
Vertical Scale Scores
Vertical Scale Scores
Vertical Scale Scores
Vertical Scale Scores
Vertical Scale Scores
Vertical Scale Scores
Vertical Scale Scores
Vertical Scale Scores
Vertical Scale Scores
Vertical Scale Scores
Vertical Scale Scores
Vertical Scale Scores
Vertical Scale Scores
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Vertical Scale Scores

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  • Refer participants to the “Accountability Standards 2009-2011” document in their binder. Let’s look at the information contained in this document. This slide reflects the accountability standards for academic performance on the TAKs. The top portion of your document, the TAKS indicator, is the percentage of students who scored high enough to meet the standard to pass the test. Results of the TAKS (grades 3-11) are summed across grade levels for each subject. Results for each subject are evaluated separately to determine ratings. As the chart on your document and this slide shows, the academically acceptable standard varies by subject while the recognized and exemplary standards are the same for all subjects. Note where the standards for recognized and acceptable will increase this year. This is noted in red on the slide.
  • Continue to refer participants to the “Accountability Standards 2009-2011” document in their binder. Another component of the state accountability system is the annual dropout rate. For accountability purposes, the annual dropout rate is used to evaluate campuses and districts with students in grades 7 and/or 8. This is a one year measure calculated by summing the numbers of dropouts across the two grades. As this slide shows the 2010 standard is 1.8% or less for all rating categories. Since the 2007 rating cycle, dropouts have been determined based on Texas’ new, more rigorous, dropout definition, which is aligned with the federal definition of a dropout. The definition is “A dropout is a student who was enrolled in 2007-2008 in a TX public school in grades 7 -12 but did not return to a TX public school the following fall within the ‘school start window’, was not expelled, did not graduate, receive a GED, continue high school outside the TX public school system, or begin college, or die." The current year’s accountability rating is based on the drop-outs from 1 year ago. For instance if a campus that serves grades 7-8 exceeds 2% drop-out rate from their 2007-08 school year data that school will be designated academically unacceptable in 2009. Another important note – this year the requirement is that students be enrolled by Sept 25 th (the last Friday in September which is the end of the “School Start Window.”)
  • Transcript

    • 1. Texas Project Measure and Vertical Scale Scores
    • 2. Objectives:
      • Explain how Texas defines value added and projects academic growth with TAKS.
      • Use Vertical Scale Scores and Texas Projection Measure to make instructional decisions to support student success.
    • 3. ACCOUNTABILITY IS LIKE… BECAUSE…
    • 4. State vs. Federal: Assessments
      • State Accountability
        • TAKS
        • TAKS (Accommodated)
      • AYP
        • TAKS
        • TAKS (Accommodated)
        • TAKS LAT
        • TAKS-M (2%)
        • TAKS-Alt (1%)
        • TELPAS (Participation)
    • 5. State vs. federal: subgroups
      • State Accountability
        • All Students
          • 30/10%/50
        • African American
        • White
        • Hispanic
        • Economically Disadvantaged
      • AYP
        • All Students
          • 50/10%/200
        • African American
        • White
        • Hispanic
        • Economically Disadvantaged
        • Special Education
        • LEP
    • 6. 2009 Accountability Ratings
      • State Accountability
      • Federal Accountability
      • # Students Met Standard
      • # Students Tested
      • To increase rating one level:
      • Apply Required Improvement
      • Recalculate Cells Using TPM
      • Use Exceptions
      • Note: Can use any combination
      • of the three provisions, but can only use one
      • for a single cell.
      • # Students Met Standard
      • or Projected to Meet Std.
      • # Students Tested
      • To increase rating:
      • Calculate “Safe Harbor” (Required Improvement)
        • Compare Met Standard Rate for 2008 and 2009 (without TPM)
        • A 10% Reduction of Failures
    • 7. State Assessment Performance Standards (AEIS) 2009 and Beyond Year 2008 2009 2010 2011 Included Tests TAKS + TAKS-Acc TAKS + TAKS-Acc TAKS + TAKS-Acc (All Grades/ Subjects) TAKS + TAKS-Acc + TAKS-M + TAKS-Alt Standards AA/Re/Ex AA/Re/Ex AA/Re/Ex AA/Re/Ex Reading/ELA 70 /75/90 70/ 75 /90 70/ 80 /90 70/80/90 Writing 65/75/90 70 / 75 /90 70/ 80 /90 70/80/90 Social Studies 65/75/90 70 / 75 /90 70/ 80 /90 70/80/90 Mathematics 50 / 75/90 55 / 75 /90 60 / 80 /90 65/ 80/90 Science 45 /7 5/90 50 / 75 /90 55 / 80 /90 60 /80/90
    • 8. State Accountability System
      • Annual Dropout Rate (Grades 7-8)
      • Standards by Accountability Year
      • (school year of dropout in parentheses)
      2008 (2006-07) 2009 (2007-08) 2010 (2008-09) 2011 (2009-10) Academically Acceptable ≤ 2.0% ≤ 2.0 ≤ 1.8% ≤ 1.6% Recognized Exemplary
    • 9. Pressure is a word that is misused in our vocabulary. When you start thinking of pressure, it’s because you’ve started thinking of failure. Tommy Lasorda, Former L.A. Dodgers Manager
    • 10. VSS vs. TPM
    • 11. Texas Projection Measure (TPM) What is TPM?
      • TPM is a method for projecting future student scores, or whether a student is likely to pass TAKS assessments, in the next high-stakes grade using students’ current year scale scores.
    • 12. Texas Projection Measure (TPM) What is TPM?
        • TPM is a method for projecting future student scores, or whether a student is likely to pass TAKS assessments, in the next high-stakes grade using students’ current year scale scores
      Grades 5, 8, or 11 with the exception of writing, which is projected from grade 4 to grade 7 vertical or horizontal depending on the grade and subject
    • 13. 2009 TPM
      • TPM provides projections for all TAKS English- and Spanish-version tests (except 8th grade science)
      • TPM projections are made separately for each subject area: reading/ELA, mathematics, writing, science, and social studies.
      • The TPM was used in 2009 for students taking the TAKS, TAKS (Accommodated), and linguistically accommodated testing (LAT) versions of TAKS.
    • 14. 2010 TPM
      • TEA proposes to:
      • expand the TPM for use with students taking the TAKS–M assessments; and
      • implement a transition table approach to growth for students participating in TAKS–Alt.
    • 15.  
    • 16. Projections From and To…
    • 17. TPM Process
    • 18. TPM Calculations – What’s Included?
    • 19. TPM Requirements
      • A student must test all subjects needed for the calculation in the same language.
      • A student must test all subjects in TAKS (the “regular” form, Accommodated form, or linguistically accommodated test form)
      • When projections for students in grades 3–8 are calculated, the student’s reading and mathematics scale scores used must be the vertical scale scores.
    • 20. TPM Requirements
      • TPM requires that a student (1) have a valid scale score in the current-year predictor subjects, (2) have a current-year scale score in the projection subject, and (3) have a valid scale score in the same language (English or Spanish) for all scores used as predictors to receive a projection.
    • 21. No TPM is available for students who…
      • take TAKS in the language versions, such as taking TAKS reading in Spanish and TAKS mathematics in English,
      • do not take all tests that are needed for a projection,
      • take TAKS for one subject and TAKS–M for another subject, and
      • are in grades 5 and 8 with student ID information that does not allow their results on the primary reading administration to be matched with records in the TAKS history file.
    • 22. VSS Student Identified Groups
    • 23. SU-HU-PU
      • Stand Up
      • Hand Up
      • Pair UP
    • 24. How will you explain this scenario to the parent of your student?
      • A 6 th grade student Met Standard on the 2009 Math TAKS test.
      • According to TPM the student is not projected to Meet Standard on the 8 th grade Math TAKS.
      • Parent is concerned about how your school plans to respond.
    • 25. How will you explain this scenario to the parent of you student?
      • Student did not Meet Standard on the 3 th grade Reading TAKS.
      • Student is projected to Meet Standard on the 5 th grade Reading TAKS.
      • Your want the student involved in extra Reading support.
      • Parent does not want the support offered and says, why worry the student is expected to Meet Standard when it counts in the 5 th grade.
    • 26. The key is not the will to win…everybody has that. It is the will to prepare to win that is important. Bobby Knight, Texas Tech Men’s Basketball Coach
    • 27. Having an above average teacher for five years running can completely close the average gap between low-income students and others. - John Kain and Eric Hanushek
    • 28. Placemat Consensus
      • Each person at your table should have a different colored marker.
      • Draw a large circle in the center of your chart paper.
      • Each person in group will have a section outside the circle.
      • In your section, explains what added value means.
    • 29. Added Value
      • Tracks the academic achievement of the same student over time.
      • Minimizes the influence of economics, experiences, privilege, and race.
      • Takes into account where a student begins the year academically and measures how much the student grows as a result of the school or teacher.
    • 30. ‘ Passing & Preparedness’
    • 31. Regional College Ready Graduates November’s AEIS Reports will reflect the class of 2008. All Af Am Hisp White Asian Male Female Eco Dis LEP ELA 52% 40% 47% 63% 67% 47% 57% 42% 4% Math 56% 35% 45% 69% 73% 58% 48% 40% 22% Both 37% 23% 29% 53% 58% 38% 37% 24% 3%
    • 32. Raw Score
      • The basic score on any test is the raw score, which is simply the number of test questions or items a student answers correctly. A raw score can be interpreted only in terms of a particular set of test questions.
      • Raw scores are converted to scale scores to determine which performance category is applied for each student in each content area assessed.
    • 33. Scale Score
      • A scale score is a conversion of the raw score onto a scale that is common to all test forms for that assessment.
      • Scale scores can be interpreted across different sets of test questions.
      • Scale scores allow direct comparisons of student performance between specific sets of test questions from different test administrations.
      • The scale score takes into account the difficulty level of the specific set of questions on which it is based. It quantifies a student’s performance relative to the passing standards or proficiency levels for such tests as the TAKS.
    • 34. 2100 – Met Standard 2400 – Commended Performance Approximate Range: 1200 – 3300 These are consistent for all grades and subjects where the horizontal scale score is used. Met Standard and Commended Performance - vary by subject and grade (See page 4 of the guide.) Approximate Range: 0 – 1000 New
    • 35. TAKS Horizontal Scale
      • For TAKS, the scale scores were defined such that the Met Standard and Commended Performance cuts were always to same scale values across forms and grades
        • Met Standard = 2100
        • Commended Performance = 2400
      • This is known as a horizontal scale
    • 36. Horizontal Scales
      • Limitations of horizontal scales
        • Scale scores across test forms can be compared within a grade, but not across grades for a subject
        • Performance standards (i.e. Met Standard and Commended) cannot be numerically compared across grade levels
          • Example: 2100 in Grade 5 ≠ 2100 in Grade 6
        • It is difficult to evaluate individual student progress from grade-to-grade
    • 37. TAKS Vertical Scale
      • A vertical scale allows scores to be compared across grade levels for a subject
        • Useful for tracking a student ’ s progress in performance across years
        • Performance standards (i.e. Met Standard and Commended) can be numerically compared across grade levels
    • 38. Academic Achievement Standards Scale Score Results Are Used To Determine the Student’s Level of Achievement
    • 39. Vertical or Horizontal?
    • 40. Why Vertical Scale Scores?
    • 41. If you don’t have time to do it right, when will you have time to do it over? John Wooden, Former UCLA Men’s Basketball Coach
    • 42. VSS Calculations
    • 43. Reading and Mathematics Vertical Scale Scores
    • 44. What about TAKS (Accommodated) TELPAS, Alternate Assessments, and EOC Assessments
      • TAKS (Accommodated) will be reported on the same vertical scale as TAKS
      • TELPAS will be reported on a vertical scale with score range from approximately 0-1000
      • TEA is considering a vertical scale for TAKS-M
      • No plans currently in place for a vertical scale for TAKS-Alt or EOC assessments
    • 45. Can we assess VSS growth?
      • The student moved to Texas and was assessed on TAKS for the first time in 2009.
      • The student was administered a Spanish mathematics TAKS in 2008 and an English version in 2009.
      • The student was administered a TAKS-M in 2008 and TAKS (Accommodated) in 2009.
      • The student was administered a TAKS test in mathematics for reading in 2008 and 2009.
    • 46. Your Calculations:
      • A 6 th grade student received a 2009 VSS of S-652 in mathematics. His 2008 VSS in mathematics was S-605.
      • Analyze the growth.
      • An 5 th grade student received a 2009 VSS of E-770 in reading . This student’s 2008 VSS was E-720.
      • Analyze the growth.
    • 47. Graphing Scores
    • 48. VSS Student Groups
    • 49. Questions and Considerations – Page 7
      • How close is the current vertical scale score from the ‘Met Standard’ level?
      • If the score doesn’t meet this academic achievement standard, how far is the score from the ‘Met Standard’ level?
      • How close is the current vertical scale score from the ‘Commended Performance’ level?
      • et.al., ….
    • 50. What about these Students? Susan 3 rd -2008 4 th -2009 5 th -2010 6 th -2011 Reading 680 725 750 770 Math 550 570 630 644 Maria 5 th -2008 6 th -2009 7 th -2010 8 th -2011 Reading 620 640 675 700 Math 610 637 665 700 Michael 4 th -2008 5 th -2009 6 th -2010 7 th -2011 Reading 780 800 834 850 Math 725 760 795 823 Frank 3 rd -2008 4 th -2009 5 th -2010 6 th -2011 Reading 400 480 600 650 Math 400 475 550 630
    • 51. Student Plan
      • What does the data say about the student?
      • What will be you priorities?
      • What is your intervention plan?
    • 52. VSS Summary Statements
      • Table Activity:
      • Create a ‘T’ chart which outlines the key points and cautions related to VSS.
      Key Points Cautions
    • 53. Success is not the result of spontaneous combustion. You must set yourself on fire. Fred Shero, Former Philadelphia Flyers Coach
    • 54. “ When I die, I want to go peacefully and quietly in my sleep like my grandfather did… not screaming and shouting like the passengers in his car at the time.”

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