What the Novel "Stargirl" Really Teaches Us
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What the Novel "Stargirl" Really Teaches Us

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What the Novel "Stargirl" Really Teaches Us What the Novel "Stargirl" Really Teaches Us Presentation Transcript

  • Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion [ Teacher Page ] A WebQuest for 9th Grade and 10 th Grade English Designed by: Elizabeth A. Reilly [email_address] Based on a template from The WebQuest Page
  • Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion [ Teacher Page ] Hello students! You have just had the opportunity to encounter “Stargirl” by Jerry Spinelli. It was in this novel that high school social groups, and stereotypes were exposed. And now, we as a class and you as a high school student, get the chance to explore your own personal bias and stereotypes. You will be challenged in many ways; your perceptions and views will alter and change, and hopefully you will learn a thing or two about yourself and other individuals that appear to be completely different from you and your friends. You are going to be a stereotype that occurs in high school. You will walk in shoes of “ditzy cheerleader”, the “gothic emo”, the “pompous jock”, and so on for this unit. From here, you will then pick an issue that your age group is experiencing. In short, you will be a stereotype with an adolescent issue. I hope that reading “Stargirl”, and participating in the activities, will give you insight into another’s life. So lets get started on the scary journey together! If at anytime you feel extremely triggered and affected by an issue, their can and will be an alternate assignment. But if your a little uncomfortable, a little unsure, it means you are learning and growing! Throughout this unit, I want you to question why we have created stereotypes in high school, and what can Stargirl and the activities in class teach us about these stereotypes. Essentially, I want you to question your own role in continuing this labeling. So lets begin… CC, Flickr: Alana Holmberg's
  • Student Page Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion [ Teacher Page ]
    • After the assignments you will complete, my hope is that you will be able to:
      • Articulate and understand the struggles that individuals stuck in stereotypes experience;
      • Be able to produce a creative writing piece depicting another’s issue ;
      • Critically and thoughtfully reevaluate the social groups and stereotypes the high school setting and people create
      • Tie the novel into your own personal experience in high school
      • Play another’s role with care and concern
      • Redefine personal perceptions of others
    • .
    Title CC, Flickr: servabofidem View slide
  • Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion [ Teacher Page ]
    • Explore and examine some high school stereotypes in a short video via this website .
    • Read article one that discusses stereotypes in depth, write down some notes as well as some feelings and thoughts about this article. Also read article two and article three. Explore these sites in depth.
    • After this task is completed, view the website video that discusses teenage issues .
    • Pick one issue and one stereotype that you want to explore for the unit. We will use a random drawing system to insure that everyone gets a fair shot at their first pick.
    • You are this stereotype with this issue for the unit. I want you to use this role to your full potential. You will write a letter, vignette, or another creative writing format (approved by me) in the role that you are playing . This is only a rough draft, but I expect effort nonetheless. I will provide examples before you get started.
    • After this task is complete I will assign groups. In these groups I want you to explain the role that you are playing and the issue that you are tackling. Every group member will discuss problems and discoveries you had when writing from a different perspective. This is also a time to have others proof read your work before you turn in the completed assignment.
    • As a class we will then play the tape game. You most assume the role you have chosen for the week. More will be discussed on this day, just be prepared to understand your issue and your stereotype.
    • The next class period will be devoted to large group discussion. Everyone will go around the circle and share the stereotype and issue they have been exploring for the week. I also want you to be prepared to share what you have learned. We will discuss novel “Stargirl” as it relates to your own personal high school experiences, and the exploration you have encountered this week.
    cc, flickr:scarlatti2004's View slide
  • Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion [ Teacher Page ] CC, Flickr: GT_Rams' See 2 nd Rubric
  • Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion [ Teacher Page ] CC, Flickr: GT_Rams' A Creative Writing Format Rubric: “Walking In Another Shoes”
  • Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] It might be the end of this unit, but my hope is that you will take away some new insights about yourself and your peers. Essentially, the objective of this unit was to walk in another’s shoes. My hope is that participating in the activities helped you to recognize some of your own personal bias, and how you as a high school student succumb to the social structures of this school. Some questions to ponder as you continue your adventure through high school is: - What is my stereotype? - What roles do I play in my school? - What can I do to break down stereotypes? Perhaps we can all strive to be a little more like Stargirl when we begin to answer these questions with honesty and integrity!
  • Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion [ Teacher Page ] This Template was created by The WebQuest Page and The WebQuest Slideshare Group The title picture was found on the website and is the cover for the novel “Stargirl” by Jerry Spinelli: - http://www.sd13.org/~ktucker/reviews/books/stargirl.jpg The following links were used from YouTube.com - http://youtube.com/watch?v=1i7kFCEB9A4&feature=related - http://youtube.com/watch?v=GZ_3p_PLJkg The following websites were used: - http://www.kqed.org/w/ymc/empowered/stereotypes.html - http://teen-culture.suite101.com/article.cfm/teen_stereotypes - http://www.media-awareness.ca/english/special_initiatives/toolkit/stereotypes/ The following creative commons pictures were found on http://flickr.com/ : Authors are: - Alana Holmberg - servabofidem - GT_Rams - scarlatti2004's
  • [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Teacher Page A WebQuest for 9th Grade and 10 th grade English Classrooms Designed by: Elizabeth Reilly [email_address] Based on a template from The WebQuest Page Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Teacher Page Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion The origin of this lesson plan stems from Mr. Terry Smith’s tenth grade honors English classroom. Being a student of his, I was able to take bits and pieces of his lesson plans in regards to teaching “Stargirl”, and apply some of his activities and thoughts to my own lesson plan. This lesson challenges students to walk in the shoes of others through writing activities, discussion, and games. The activities center around high school stereotypes and current adolescent issues. Students will role play a stereotype and issue, challenging preconceived notions of their peers. The novel “Stargirl” is the backbone of this experiment, becoming the main reference material for the students. .
  • [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Teacher Page This lesson is designed for 9 th grade students as well as 10 th grade students. Because of the content of the book, and the specific emotional, physical, and intellectual changes that are taking place with the younger high school students, it is best to limit this lesson to the freshman and sophomores. For this lesson students need to know: - The content of the novel “Stargirl” by Jerry Spinelli - Have background knowledge of current stereotypes in present high school settings - Have information about the different issues that occur in the 14-18 year old adolescent age group. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
    • Explore and examine some high school stereotypes in a short video via this website .
    • Read article one that discusses stereotypes in depth, write down some notes as well as some feelings and thoughts about this article. Also read article two and article three . Explore these sites in depth.
    • After this task is completed, view the website video that discusses teenage issues .
    • Pick one issue and one stereotype that you want to explore for the unit. We will use a random drawing system to insure that everyone gets a fair shot at their first pick.
    • You are this stereotype with this issue for the unit. I want you to use this role to your full potential. You will write a letter, vignette, or another creative writing format (approved by me) in the role that you are playing . This is only a rough draft, but I expect effort nonetheless. I will provide examples before you get started.
    • After this task is complete I will assign groups. In these groups I want you to explain the role that you are playing and the issue that you are tackling. Every group member will discuss problems and discoveries you had when writing from a different perspective. This is also a time to have others proof read your work before you turn in the completed assignment.
    • As a class we will then play the tape game. You most assume the role you have chosen for the week. More will be discussed on this day, just be prepared to understand your issue and your stereotype.
    • - Have students line u against the wall.
    • - Place a tape line in the middle of the room, so that half the students
    • on one side of the wall, and the other half of the students are
    • alongside the other wall.
    • - Students will be the stereotype and issue that they are role-playing
    • for this game, make sure that they are acting.
    • - Ask simple questions, if the question applies to the student actor,
    • then the student will go to the line.
    • - Continue this question asking, making the questions a little more
    • difficult as students build up trust.
    • - Have discussion questions to follow up on what they have learned.
    • 8. The next class period will be devoted to large group discussion. Everyone will go around the circle and share the stereotype and issue they have been exploring for the week. I also want you to be prepared to share what you have learned. We will discuss novel “Stargirl” as it relates to your own personal high school experiences, and the exploration you have encountered this week.
  • [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page
    • Describe what's needed to implement this lesson. Some of the possibilities:
      • Class set of novels for “Stargirl” by Jerry Spinelli
      • Computer lab time so that students will be able to go to a few websites that are implemented in the lesson:
      • Links are:
    • http://youtube.com/watch?v=GZ_3p_PLJkg
    • http://teen-culture.suite101.com/article.cfm/teen_stereotypes http:/www.mediaawareness.ca/english/special_initiatives/toolkit/stereotypes/
    • http:/youtube.com/watch?v=1i7kFCEB9A4&feature=related
    • http://teen-culture.suite101.com/article.cfm/teen_stereotypes
    • All the websites above discuss stereotypes and the issues that youth today face. The videos on YouTube.com do an excellent job at depicting both stereotypes and issues, giving students a visual aid.
    • Only one teacher is necessary to complete the tasks. The lessons are student propelled, meaning that the role the teacher plays is primary the facilitator. Make sure that you have well developed questions for the activates.
    Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Teacher Page Student Rubrics best outline the expectation the that students should meet in order to be successful at this project. . The first rubric goes along with the literature circle that will take place: Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion See 2 nd Rubric
  • [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Teacher Page Student Rubrics best outline the expectation the that students should meet in order to be successful at this project. . The second rubric goes is the evaluation for the creative writing project: Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Teacher Script Continued Teacher Page
    • First Day of the Unit:
    • Introduce the unit, discussing some key elements that the students learned from the novel Stargirl.
    • Brainstorm with the students. Write down on the board stereotypes that they have encountered throughout their educational experiences. Be sure to have a disclaimer before this process, making sure that students do not put down the “ditzy cheerleader” or the “dumb jock”. This is fine terminology, because it indeed depicts the stereotypes, but students need to be sensitive to the labels as well.
    • You as the teacher will then start discussing some issues that young adolescents face today. This is another sensitive subject for some, make sure that students realize this, before the process begins. Alternative assignments can and should be giving if need arises.
    • Second Day of Unit:
    • The next day is devoted to the students researching. Students should be in a computer lab, or have a laptop available. In their student WebQuest, there is links to which they should follow, watch, read, and report.
    • During this time, students should be taking down notes, asking questions, and reflecting on some of the information that is being given.
    • Third Day of Unit:
    • The first ten minutes of the class period, students will pick their stereotype and issue. Each student, one at a time, will come to the board, write their issue and stereotype. First come, first serve.
    • Give students writing assignment, make sure that you give examples. Students will write from the point of view of the stereotype with the particular issue. The writing assignment is open, and meant to be a creative outlet. Start a discussion, what makes the vignettes, letters, etc good, bad?
    • The rest of the hour is spent working on drafts, brainstorming, etc.
    • Fourth Day of Unit:
    • Today students should work on rough draft for 20 minutes
    • After the twenty or so minutes is up, students will be put into groups by you. The groups should be controversial in accordance to the different stereotypes. Ex: The “Emo Kid” with the “Ditzy Cheerleader”.
    Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page
    • Have students discuss the experience with the writing assignment, and the role they are playing.
    • Fifth Day of Unit:
    • Today students will take a break from the writing process, and play the tape game.
    • Make sure to tell students that they are to play the stereotype that they choose.
    • Place tape down the center of the room, divide students up; half along one side of the wall, the other half on the other wall.
    • You will ask questions that pertain to their stereotypes;
    • Ex: Have you ever been bullied?
    • Have you ever been left out?
    • Have you ever been to a party and felt uncomfortable?
    • If the question applies to the student they will go to the middle of the room and stand on the tape.
    • Follow up with discussion questions.
    • Ex: What did the assignment teach us?
    • What can we learn about stereotypes?
    • What did you learn about your peers?
    • Sixth Day of Unit:
    • Students should be done with writing assignment, have them bring it to class
    • Everyone should sit in a circle, and go around and share stereotype and issue with the class.
    • Open discussion group up to class, have students share some of their writing pieces if they feel comfortable.
    • Ex: How do the activities relate to “Stargirl”
    • What did we learn from Stargirl, and the assignments?
    • What will you take away from this experience?
    Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Teacher Page After all is said and done, the hope is that the students challenge their perceptions of their peers, and gain insight about the social structures that high school dynamics create. If the process goes as follows, students will be able to relate the novel’s themes to their own real life experiences. You are a facilitator, quietly guiding the students on a self reflective journey during this unit. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion This Template was created by The WebQuest Page and The WebQuest Slideshare Group The title picture was found on the website and is the cover for the novel “Stargirl” by Jerry Spinelli: - http://www.sd13.org/~ktucker/reviews/books/stargirl.jpg The following links were used from YouTube.com - http://youtube.com/watch?v=1i7kFCEB9A4&feature=related - http://youtube.com/watch?v=GZ_3p_PLJkg The following websites were used: - http://www.kqed.org/w/ymc/empowered/stereotypes.html - http://teen-culture.suite101.com/article.cfm/teen_stereotypes - http://www.media-awareness.ca/english/special_initiatives/toolkit/stereotypes/ The following creative commons pictures were found on http://flickr.com/ : Authors are: - Alana Holmberg - servabofidem - GT_Rams - scarlatti2004's