Mega

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Mega

  1. 1. Game 1 hour Divide the kids by skill and age. Let the older kids play skip and vice. Instructors should be on the ice to manage positioning, readiness and game speed. The Youth-Blue Group (grades 4-6) Youth-Blue Proficiency Standards Youth-Blue curler advances to the Junior category for seventh grade regardless of skill. However, they should be able to demonstrate the following skills: • Several pre-game stretching exercises • A proper setup position • A 1-2-3 delivery with a full slider, a broom (no sliding device) and NO rock. The sliding foot should be underneath the body with the hack foot trailing straight behind and no weight on the broom or rock • Upright sweeping with no slider on takeout and peel weight rocks • Throw a regulation rock draw into play on a full sheet • Throw a regulation rock takeout on a full sheet (3.10 split) • A release from a constant 45 degree angle to the hand shake position • Judge the weight of a draw within 20 feet of its resting spot • Focus for an entire 8-end game • Put 1 of 4 draws in play • Make contact on 1 of 4 take-outs They should also have the following curling knowledge: • Several safety items to consider while curling • In-turn and out-turn rotation • Free Guard Zone Rule • Shot types draw, takeout and guard, peel, freeze, come around • Basic shot-calling tactics with and without hammer • Teaching to the Youth Blue Standards Again, the goal of the program is to have the kids have fun AND learn the proper skills at the same time. One quarter of the scheduled time should be dedicated to skill training. The other three quarters should be used for a game. For the first half of each session, have the kids perform the skill training drills for each standard. Each week use the stretching, setup, delivery and sweeping drills. Alternate each week with the remaining drills. The following is an example of a two-hour session. Testing for Learning
  2. 2. As with the Little Rockers and Youth Green groups, occasionally test them against the standard. This can be casual and discrete. About every month, have the kids demonstrate a skill or ask them a curling question. If they can do it, your teaching is working. If they can't, either your teaching is failing or their not ready yet. In most cases, the child is simply not ready to demonstrate the skill properly and more repetition is needed. This is the case in the beginning of each category when the kids transition from a lower group. Remember, they have two or three more years to practice. As they get closer to the transitioning to a higher group, note any deficiencies and concentrate on them. Create a more formal test to judge whether they're ready to transition to another group. Blue Group Expectations This group can begin to properly deliver a regulation size rock. They won't have full control of the delivery yet even though they think they should. They may or may not be able to throw normal weight takeouts. Like all categories, some kids will be able to slide over their slider foot without weight on the broom. This is the time to transition them from a sliding device to a broom. If they can't slide with reasonable balance, keep them on the sliding device. Curling Shoes? The Youth Blue curlers are encouraged to purchase curling shoes (or have a slider built into a pair of sneakers) although a full slider can still work well at these ages. The value of curling shoes is in the sliding platform. With curling shoes, the sliding platform is much more stable than the slip-on slider and will increase performance. Figure 5. This sixth grader can balance over his sliding foot. He delivers a regulation size rock in the last year of the Youth Blue category. He slides with a regular broom without putting weight on it. He also slides with a 1/4 inch slider built into his sneakers.
  3. 3. Youth Blue Sample Session #1 Stretching 5 minutes Off ice Use two or three stretching exercises. Deep knee bends and the curling extension should be mandatory. Setup & Delivery 15 Minutes At the hack, have the curlers take turns with two practice slides. They will rotate using two or three sliding devices. For each player, then have them demonstrate the proper setup first. Early in the season the instructor will demonstrate but as they get more comfortable with the drill they can do it own their own, with instructor feedback. The younger curlers (grade 4 may still need a sliding device if they can't balance over the foot). Check for the following "delivery critical" components: • Step back onto sliding foot with hips behind hack • Delay sliding foot as body starts forward • Place heel on line of delivery • Hold 45 degrees until release The most important thing for this group is to step back onto the sliding foot then move the rock forward first. There should be no movement past back-dead-center of the draw step move. Remember, this is a delivery drill and NOT shot-making drill. Watch closely for problems with mechanics. Stand at the hog line and have them throw draw-weight shots to you. Watch the deliveries and provide feedback. Repetitions: 4 each Sweeping 5 Minutes Take the sliders off and have them line up to sweep live rocks. Place half of them on one side and half on the other. The instructor should push a rock for the two lead sweepers (the ones in line first, one on each side) to sweep. They must sweep the rock until it stops or is out of play. Watch the sweeping action. Look for the required components: • Step back onto sliding foot with hips behind hack • Delay sliding foot as body starts forward • Place heel on line of delivery • Hold 45 degrees until release The most important thing for this group is to step back onto the sliding foot then move the rock forward first. There should be no movement past back-dead-center of the draw step move. Remember, this is a delivery drill and NOT shot-making drill. Watch closely for problems with mechanics. Stand at the hog line and have them throw draw-weight shots to you. Watch the deliveries and provide feedback. Repetitions: Twice up and back Draw 5 minutes
  4. 4. In the hack, have the curlers throw draw shots full sheet. It's important that they throw with a steady slide. It's better to throw a draw half way with a smooth slide than to hit the house with a huge push. Time the draws full sheet and have them understand the long time as the sheet speed. Have them measure the split times to get comfortable with splits being a sweeping tool. Repetitions: 2 each Break 10 Minutes Game 1 hour Divide the curlers by skill and age. Let the older kids play skip and vice. Instructors should be on the ice to manage positioning and game speed. At the middle or end of the season, the instructor can supervise from behind the glass. Youth Blue Sample Session #2 Stretching 5 minutes – Off ice Use two or three stretching exercises. Deep knee bends and the curling extension should be mandatory. Drop Drill 10 Minutes See the Practice Section for an explanation of the Drop Drill. Before the curlers move into the delivery drill, have them take turns with the drop drill. Make sure the rock half way between the house and the hack before the sliding foot moves forward. Repetitions: 2 each Setup & Delivery 15 Minutes Now that the curlers have done the drop drill, they can practice the full delivery. They will rotate using two or three sliding devices. For each player, then have them demonstrate the proper setup first. Early in the season the instructor will demonstrate but as they get more comfortable with the drill they can do it own their own, with instructor feedback. The younger curlers (grade 4 may still need a sliding device if they can't balance over the foot). Check for the following "delivery critical" components: • Step back onto sliding foot with hips behind hack • Delay sliding foot as body starts forward Place heel on line of delivery • Hold 45 degrees until release The most important thing for this group is to step back onto the sliding foot then move the rock forward first. There should be no movement past back-dead-center of the draw step move. Remember, this is a delivery drill and NOT shot-making drill. Watch closely for
  5. 5. problems with mechanics. Stand at the hog line and have them throw draw-weight shots to you. Watch the deliveries and provide feedback. Repetitions: 4 each Sweeping 5 Minutes Take the sliders off and have them line up to sweep live rocks. Place half of them on one side and half on the other. The instructor should push a rock for the two lead sweepers (the ones in line first, one on each side) to sweep. They must sweep the rock until it stops or is out of play. Watch the sweeping action. Look for the required components: • Stance is 45 degrees to the line of delivery • Inside arm down with hand half way down the handle • Down hand uses overhand grip to provide pressure • Up hand uses an underhand grip • Drive broom head with upper shoulder • Shuffle feet instead of walking Repetitions: Twice up and back Takeouts 5 minutes In the hack, have them throw takeout weight shots to the instructor at the near hog line with a smooth slide and release. The "Drop" concept stressed earlier is helpful in generating more power on the takeouts. You can provide them with immediate feedback by split timing the takeout. The split should be between 3.00 and 3.20 seconds, back line to hog. The younger ones (grade 5) may not have the strength for full takeouts. It's important that the kids throw with a steady slide. It's better to throw a takeout light with a smooth slide than to throw big weight with a huge push. As they get older (grades 5 and 6) they will start to develop more power. Repetitions: 3 each Break 10 Minutes Game 1 hour Divide the curlers by skill and age. Let the older kids play skip and vice. Instructors should be on the ice to manage positioning and game speed. At the middle or end of the season, the instructor can supervise from behind the glass. Junior (teenage) Curlers (grades 7-12) As a rule, the Juniors should be delivering with the broom and not the sliding device. The sliding device may still be used by exception.
  6. 6. Expect this group to want more autonomy during the session due to more adult-like behavior (at least with the older kids). Socializing is an important part of this group's junior session. An instructor is still necessary to provide feedback during drills. Junior Proficiency Standards At the end of the Junior program, they should be able to demonstrate the following skills: Several pre-game stretching exercises • A proper setup position • A balanced 1-2-3 delivery with a full slider, and a broom. The sliding foot should be underneath the body with the hack foot trailing straight behind and no weight on the broom or rock. A sliding device is acceptable* if the Junior curler cannot balance over the foot. • Upright sweeping with no slider on takeout and peel weight rocksWeight control on guards, house draws, hack weight, takeouts and peels. • A release from a constant 45 degree angle to the hand shake position • Proper weight judgment *Like adults, there are junior age curlers that cannot balance over the sliding foot. Never force them to slide with a broom if they can't balance reasonably. They should also have the following curling knowledge: • Several safety items to consider while curling • All shot types • Basic shot-calling tactics with and without hammer Teaching to the Junior Standards Again, the goal of the program is to have fun AND learn the proper skills at the same time. Playing games is a priority. In the Junior category 1/4 of the scheduled time should be dedicated to skill training. The other 3/4 should be used for a game. For the first 1/4 of each session, have them perform the skill training drills for each standard. Each week use the stretching, setup, delivery and sweeping drills. Alternate each week with the remaining drills. The following is an example of a two-hour session. Testing for Learning As with the Little Rockers and Youth groups, occasionally test Juniors against the standard. This can be casual and discrete. About every month, have the kids demonstrate
  7. 7. a skill or ask them a curling question. If they can do it, your teaching is working. If they can't, either your teaching is failing or their not ready yet. In most cases, the child is simply not ready to demonstrate the skill properly and more repetition is needed. This is the case in the beginning of each category when the kids transition from a lower group. Remember, they have two or three more years to practice. As they get closer to the transitioning to a higher group, note any deficiencies and concentrate on them. Create a more formal test to judge whether they're ready to transition to another group. Junior Group Expectations The Junior group should be treated like adults as far as skills and mechanics. There is a remarkable change in the ability to properly deliver a rock during the growth of the early teen years. We've seen twelve year-olds that can barely balance turn into thirteen year olds with perfect balance. There will always be differences based on athleticism. Some juniors will be more proficient at the skills than others. As the body begins to be more adult-like, the Junior curler can begin to slide and balance without problems. As for the delivery, you can expect as much from them as you could from adults. The younger ones that are just transitioning to Juniors may still have difficulty with takeout weight. Sample Junior Session The Junior group, like all curlers, needs repetition to engrain the proper delivery skills. Every Junior session should include delivery work. Instructors must be present to provide immediate feedback. The following drills MUST be done at every session: 1. Stretching 2. Comprehensive Delivery 3. Sweeping Each week, add a non-compulsory drill to further strengthen a given skill set. The following delivery drills can help the group focus on a particular detail of the delivery. • Balance Drill • Drop Drill • Release Drill • Take-out Drill (split-timed) • Draw Drill Stretching 5 Minutes By now they know the stretching exercises and can be stretched prior to the start time. Comprehensive Delivery 15 Minutes This drill involves properly demonstrating the entire delivery from set up to follow- through.
  8. 8. At the hack, have them take a few practice slides. There may be some that still need a sliding device if they can't balance over the foot. Watch for the following: • Proper setup • Use a 1-2-3 tempo in the delivery • Delay the sliding foot at draw back • No backward movement of the hips after stepping back onto sliding foot • Delay the sliding foot until the rock is half way. • By the tee line, slide with the broom 1 inch from the ice • Hold cocked handle until proper release Repetitions: 3 each Sweeping 5 Minutes Take the sliders off and have them line up to sweep live rocks. Place half of them on one side and half on the other. The instructor should push a rock for the two lead sweepers (the ones in line first, one on each side) to sweep. They must sweep the rock until it stops or is out of play. Watch the sweeping action. Look for the required components: • Stance is 45 degrees to the line of delivery • Inside arm down with hand half way down the handle • Down hand uses overhand grip to provide pressure • Up hand uses an underhand grip • Drive broom head with upper shoulder • Shuffle feet instead of walking At the far end, don't change sides but sweep back with switched arms. Repetitions: Once up and back Additional Drill 10 Minutes Add an appropriate additional drill here. Break 10 minutes The older kids may prefer to take a break after the game. Game 1 hour 15 minutes Divide the Juniors into teams. Let the older ones play skip and vice while the younger ones play front-end. Early in the season, the instructors should be on the ice to manage positioning and game speed. Once they understand the routine, the instructor can monitor from behind the glass. Elapsed Time: 2 Hours Additional Drills
  9. 9. Drop Drill & Balance Before they move into the delivery drill, have them take turns with the drop drill. Expect them to delay the foot until the rock is half way between the hack and the back of the house. After the transition period, they should slide with the broom 1 inch off the ice. Repetitions: 3 each Takeouts 5 minutes In the hack, have the kids throw to the instructor at the near hog line with a smooth slide and release. Have them use the Drop Drill concept to generate more power on the takeouts. After one round, switch to the full sheet. The younger ones (grade 7 and 8) may not have the strength for full takeouts. It's important that the kids throw with a steady slide. It's better to throw a takeout light with a smooth slide than to throw big weight with a huge push. As they get older (grades 10 - 12) they will start to develop more power. Split-time the takeouts. After each throw, the thrower takes the stopwatch and clocks the next delivery. The target takeout should be between 3.00 and 3.20 with a smooth delivery. Junior Category Social Component This is the age where social interaction becomes much more a part of curling. We recommend that all junior age curlers play on mixed teams (two girls, two boys, alternating positions) when part of your normal junior program. Junior age teams that want more competition may elect to form all boys and all girls teams to enter the national playdown process. Keep these teams and programs separate from you club junior program. There will most likely be a huge difference in physical and social maturity in this age group since it spans from age 13 to 18. Try to place similar ages on teams and have them play each other. Accepting New Kids in Your Program Each year, your club accepts new young members. Some will have parents that curl. It's important that they enter the program properly. First, place the new curler into the appropriate grade category. An instructor will need to work individually with the inexperienced curler by acclimating them to the club and ice. For the next few sessions, the newer curler should receive individual attention until they are ready to work the drills and exercises with the experienced ones.
  10. 10. For example, a new 4th grader will join the Youth Green group and receive special attention for the first few sessions. A fifth grader is harder to place. You can place them in the Youth Green for a few sessions or place them directly into the Youth Blue. New sixth and seventh graders should always be placed in the Youth Blue category due to the age differences between the Blue and Green. Again, special attention is needed to bring the new curler up to speed. Seventh graders can start in the Youth-Blue if they don't have friends in the Junior category. They can also start in the Junior category. If starting in the Youth-Blue, move them up as soon as possible. Eighth graders should be placed into the Junior group. In all cases, the new curler should come through the same development process that your existing players did. Start them with a sliding device and not a broom. Depending on their skill level, transition them onto a broom when they can properly use it. Aging Out of the Program The World Curling Federation age limit for the Junior Championships is 21. However, your local Junior program should only include junior high (middle school) and high school age curlers. Allowing the 19 through 21 year old group into your normal program and bonspiels could be a problem. Consider them adults (as they are since they're over 18) and encourage them to curl in the College Curling program, adult leagues and bonspiels. Competitive Junior Programs at the Club Your junior curling program at the club should be focused on the social aspects of the game. The social curler is the backbone of most clubs. Inevitably, some of your young curlers will seek a more competitive environment. We encourage clubs to develop programs for the more competitive as well. Keep them separate! Allowing your competitive teams to curl together in the social program and junior bonspiels will alienate the less competitive kids and your program will suffer. It's also simply not fair to allow your best players to play together in a social setting.
  11. 11. Set up another program at your club with different, more competitive goals and objectives. Give them a separate time slot. This program should include: • Team development • A commitment to proper delivery mechanics • Advanced equipment (shoes and brooms) • Effective and efficient sweeping • Game planning and strategy • Team communication • Mental toughness • Fitness and nutrition • Higher goals and objectives Section Summary • Juniors must have FUN FIRST • Categorize your young curlers by grade • Teach to the proficiency standard for each group • Teach proper mechanics early • Use proper training techniques when teaching kids • Grades K-3/4 (and all brand new curlers, regardless of age) should use a sliding device and not a broom • For social and maturity reasons your junior program should end after high school • Develop a competitive program for the playdown curlers Section 14 Starting a New Curling Club This section provides an overview of starting a new curling club. It offers an outline of a process and some tricks and traps of the curling club. The term "club" refers to a dedicated group of curlers that curl on a regular basis. Clubs can form and join regional associations with little effort (usually a minimum number of members and the association fee). Process for Starting a New Club
  12. 12. Use the following simple process for new club start-up. • Start with a vision. • Draft a plan. • Find a core group of dedicated curlers. • Start slow by renting ice. • Build membership with a facility in mind. • Raise capital and/or create financing options for a new facility. • Design the facility. • Build your new club. The Vision If you're reading this, someone has a vision of a new club. It may the first club in a new market, an additional club in an existing market or a new facility in an existing market. Either way, the amount of awareness regarding the sport has increased exponentially since the Olympic coverage in 2002 and 2006 and many areas of the world are seeking curling. Think big, plan carefully. Drafting a Plan Start by discussing your vision with a few people in the area. If it's worth moving forward, you need a plan. The plan can be as simple as gathering more information or as complex as club marketing, facility design, and implementation. Start with a simple plan and build on it. Check the viability periodically. Strategic Plan Immediately upon the formation of your new club, a strategic plan should be drafted. A mission statement should be crafted to explain what you are, what you want to do and how you'll do it. A fairly detailed plan of goals and objectives should span the first three years of operation. The plan is then updated every year by the Board of Directors. The Core Group You may be acting alone, have a group of investors, or be part of a core group of enthusiastic curlers. In any case, you will need a group of people you can trust to work through the plan with you. In many cases, a lead person will head the project with help. Find existing curlers in the area by contacting the national association. In the US, find the Canadian transplants. If you're from an existing market, find people that either share your vision or really like it.
  13. 13. Start Slowly or Jump Right In If you have a core group and want to test the viability of your vision, try renting ice at the local ice rink. This may help build a membership base which you'll need to secure financing of a new facility. On the other hand, a business case can be made to build a facility before you secure the member base. You will need to be more capitalized in order to stay afloat during the first few years of membership building. Designing Your Facility When you're ready, you'll need a design that works for your club. Below are some options and ideas to consider. Club Configurations Configuration refers to how clubs provide curling for their members. Some have dedicated facilities and others have no facility. The following describes a few configurations. Non-Facility Options Natural Ice Like our curling fore-fathers, playing the game on a natural surface can be quite fun. A flooded area or pond (or large lake, for that matter) can be suitable for a game of curling and the beginnings of a formal club. Scribe the rings and off you go. Ice Arena Rental The easiest and least expensive way to operate a curling club is to rent ice from the local arena. Since arenas are not generally built for curling, the hockey teams and figure skater usually get the best times. The field of play is usually poor since the Zamboni prepares the base ice. Circles are either scribed into the ice each session or painted in the ice. Rock storage is a problem. Even one sheet of rocks must be stored cold to avoid melt-in at game time. Studio Rink Rental Some large arenas have studio rinks built to help with overflow figure skaters, broomball rentals and other events. If a studio rink is available, you may be able to rent it for a reduced rate. Dedicated Facility Options Curling clubs across the world have many sizes and shapes. The one thing they all have in common are sheets of ice for curling. Clubs range in size from one sheet to dozens of
  14. 14. sheets. Clubs of the 2-8 sheet variety are the most common. A facility can be made multi- use in the summer months by adding air conditioning and a concrete base. Attached Dedicate Curling Many large arenas and rinks have enough compressor capacity to run a few sheets of curling ice. This option allows a dedicated curling facility to start without a separate capital investment in the refrigeration equipment, site work, parking lot, etc. Stand-Alone Dedicated The preferred configuration is a dedicated curling club as a stand-alone structure. This provides ultimate control over operations. This configuration is the most expensive from a capital investment perspective as well as an operational perspective. In all dedicated facilities, a multi-use configuration helps. Curling in the summer is cost prohibitive due to high electricity costs. It's not out of the question but you'll need a fairly dedicated group to pay the electric bill. Summer facility rentals of the warm room and bar area can provide needed revenue to pay annual expenses. Weddings and other similar events can utilize your kitchen and bar area. Air conditioning and a concrete base are multi-use necessities. Municipal Partnerships Some municipalities are open to partnership ideas. Curling provides a unique offering to any parks or recreation program. In some cases, cities and towns will provide land at no or low cost in order to provide curling to the community. Normally, an agreement is made to offer curling through the town recreation program. Club Size Before designing the new club, consider how many curlers you will have. This is a difficult exercise especially in areas where there is little or no existing curling. Club capacity is based on the number of sheets of ice. Work with this rule of thumb: One hundred members for each sheet of ice. Member demographics will drive that number up or down. The capacity of a large metro area clubs can be lower due to the lack of daytime curling. Club Layout and Design Designing a club is like designing a new house. There are many different styles. The areas of major consideration are the warm room, the ice shed, locker rooms, compressor room and restrooms. The following is a list of things to consider in the design of a dedicated facility. Overall Layout Considerations
  15. 15. The following are suggestions for a curling facility. Carefully research each idea for viability. Clubs in the northern hemisphere are best laid out from north to south, with the warm room end facing north. The ice shed home-end is warmed by the warm room walls and glass. To compensate, the ice shed away-end should receive southern exposure of the sun on the building. The building entrance path must not cross the ice entry path. Players moving from the warm room to the ice and from the locker rooms to the ice should never cross the traffic area from the building entrance. This will track dirt, salt and chemicals onto the ice. A heated front walkway is a great idea. This eliminates the need for salting near the front door and never requires shoveling. • Warm Room Considerations o Bar area o Coat closet near entrance o Supply closet/room o Recreation area for billiards, game table, etc. o Television area o Restrooms outside the locker rooms o Fireplace o Kitchen o Office o Several phone locations o Meeting space (Board meetings, committee meetings, club rentals, etc.) o Bulletin Board area o Curling supply store area o Stepped area near glass for staggered viewing o Central vacuum o Handicapped ramps or elevator o PA system piped to all areas of the club o Refrigeration plant enunciator (little lights) monitoring area • Ice Shed Considerations o Playing surface grade. The ice surface should 5-6 feet lower than the warroom for best viewing. o Concrete base o Odd sheet number provides championship/TV sheet in center o Sheet size (15' 7") o Low ceiling height
  16. 16. o Heat and dehumidification duct work o Shed insulation o Epoxy painted rings on concrete o Maintenance/Compressor room access o Scraper cold-storage area o Sheet scaling (building for 7 sheets but only using 5, or 5 to use 3) o Sheet border carpet o Light-ring telephone on-ice o Ice access restrooms (optional) • Locker Room Considerations o Capacity should be one complete draw (number of sheets times 8) o Locker types (should be tall enough for a broom) o Benches (members should be able to sit and change shoes in front of their locker) o Minimum two toilets for men, three for women) o Showers (optional) o Broom bag storage above lockers o Ice access directly from the locker rooms • Compressor Room Considerations o Easy access from ice o Heated snow pit (melts scraper snow) o Deionized water and water heater station for pebbling o Work bench and tool area o Heat exchange from condenser discharge o Fractional surface temperature control Facility Design Essentials The following items are the "must have" items for your new facility. They are all ice and field of play related. When you discuss the options for new facility and begin to allocate funds, include these items first. Your club is first and foremost about curling. Spending extra money on your warm room is great but only after these items are covered. Even novice curlers enjoy the game more on a good playing surface. Fast, true ice allows all skill levels, including juniors to make shots more consistently. To have great ice, you need a properly designed and equipped ice shed and a competent ice technician. This will allow ease of ice prep for all leagues and levels. Odd Number of Sheets When deciding how many sheets to build, your potential membership numbers will dictate. Capacity, long term is the main consideration. Once you have determined your capacity needs, think about an odd number of sheets. We recommend never building less than four sheets. If you've decided on four then consider moving up to five. An odd number provides a "center sheet". This can be surrounded by carpeted walkways for high
  17. 17. presentation value. The championship sheet can used for championship games, televised games, club championship, etc. This is where a prominent logo or sponsor logo will go. National championships, Olympic Trials, Mixed, Juniors etc, are usually round robin events with ten teams. Five sheets minimum is necessary to host these events. Concrete Base A concrete base (as opposed to sand) in your ice shed is essential for making and maintaining ice. It allows the ice tech to easily make ice at the beginning of the season without requiring the help of too many people. With the rings and lines epoxy painted on the concrete, an ice tech can make ice from scratch in 2-3 days. This will save on electricity and allow the club to make ice for summer bonspiels. Concrete also provides an even temperature control on the surface. The cooling pipes are embedded in the concrete by several inches and about four inches apart (on center). The mass of the concrete will dissipate the cooling properties evenly between the pipes resulting in a perfecting level surface above it. In contrast, a sand base does not have the mass of concrete and will "pull" heat unevenly with more cooling over the feed pipes and less over the returns and dead space. This causes "pipe runs" on the surface which are slight depressions over the return pipes. This is not level and requires much more ice maintenance than concrete. Sound quality in the shed is also better with concrete. Rocks run quieter instead of the low rumble caused by sand over and insulated base. Insulation, Heat and Dehumidification Proper climate control is necessary to control moisture. Allowing moisture in your building will cause frost on the ice surface requiring more time and energy to prepare the ice. Frost causes rocks to run straight. Choose a quality system that will provide heat and dehumidification. Heat exchangers using heat from the refrigeration plant can be very energy efficient. Your club's coordinates (position latitude) will dictate how much dehumidification you need. Low Shed Ceiling A low ceiling in the shed will reduce the volume of air to be controlled, making it more energy efficient. Sound from screaming skips is also reduced. Radiant Heat Curtain Your ice surface is being bombarded by radiant heat from the sun through the roof, even on cloudy days. Placing a radiant heat barrier under your roof will greatly reduce the radiant heat on your ice surface. This in turn allows the compressor to cycle less to maintain your surface temperature.
  18. 18. Compressor Capacity and Cycling A properly fitted compressor will allow your ice tech to make ice in a short period of time. It will also "pull" heat faster when large heat loads are placed on the ice. Heat loads include heaters, players, lights, etc. (television lights add an enormous load). Compressor cycling should be controlled in tenth of a degree to maintain your desired surface temperature. Financial Overview Unfortunately, financial information for brand new clubs is limited. Clubs are generally formed by a small group of dedicated curlers in a certain area. Very few clubs have been completed from scratch in the last 30 years. In many cases, new facilities are the result of existing clubs rebuilding. The following is a skeleton annual cash flow statement of a new club with 6 sheets. This club has a full time manager/ice person. A one million dollar start-up costs is categorized as follows; the land is purchased at 250,000, the structure built for $500,000 and equipment at 250,000 financed at 60%. Use the following numbers as a guideline and adjust as necessary. Fully Staffed Club Revenues Memberships Dues
  19. 19. 300 members X $400 $120,000 Bar Revenue $40,000 Club Rental $5,000 Bonspiel Revenue $20,000 Total Revenue $185.000 Cost of Goods Sold Bar goods $25,000 Expenses Utilities $25,000 Insurance $10,000 Real Estate Taxes $13,000 Snow Removal $5,000 Club Manager/Ice $40,000 Payroll Taxes $8,000 Principle & Interest $40,000 Misc. $19,000 Total Expenses 185,000 Gross Cash Flow $0,00 You can see that is a break-even scenario. These numbers are VERY rough. They should be used as directional only. Working these numbers can be a fun exercise. Membership can really drive the numbers. This example has half of capacity of the club as members. Obviously, the key factors are the land and building costs, amount of initial capital and the full time manager. Substitute donated land, more capital, no manager (volunteer based), more members, higher dues, etc. Driving the revenue items can dramatically increase cash flow. Occupancy costs (mortgage, rent, real estate taxes, etc.) will stay fixed. Utilities will be a semi variable
  20. 20. cost, increasing only with added draws during the day. Club rental is a popular source of additional revenue. Daytime rentals for off-site corporate meetings can draw $500 for an afternoon, not including bar revenue. Volunteer-Based Club (no payroll and payroll taxes) Revenues Memberships Dues 300 members X $400 $120,000 Bar Revenue $40,000 Club Rental $5,000 Total Revenue $165.000 Cost of Goods Sold Bar goods $20,000 Expenses Utilities $25,000 Insurance $10,000 Real Estate Taxes $13,000 Snow Removal $5,000 Principle & Interest $40,000 Misc. $4,000 Total Expenses $117,000 Gross Cash Flow $48,000 Equipment • Ice/Shed Related o Two 25 ton compressors, condenser, chiller, brine pumps, or, o Three 20 ton compressors o Fractional controller (.10 of a degree)
  21. 21. o Cordless scraper with 5' blade o Hand scraper o Scoreboards o Twelve trash bins o Stiff bristle 6 foot broom o Soft sheep skin 6-foot broom o Misc. shovels and brooms o Two measuring devices o Two six foot measures o Paint sprayer with pump o Pebbler with pebble head o Hot water heater for pebble o Deionized water system o Dedicated ice mop and bucket • Kitchen o Commercial range with grill o Exhaust hood o Dishwasher o Coffee grinder and brewer o Commercial walk-in refrigerator/freezer o Microwave o Misc. serving and cookware o Food prep sink and disposer o Hand sink o Fryer (optional) • Bar o Dishwasher o Ice maker o Lockable bottle cooler o Keg refrigerator o Taps o Glassware o Cash register • Warm Room o Sheet monitors for away end o One round table and chairs (8) for each sheet of ice o Two soft couches
  22. 22. o Two soft chairs o Two tables o PA/Music system o 50" flat screen television (optional) o 9' Pool table (optional) o Meeting table and chairs o Fireplace grill and equipment o Display case o Food serving table o Dance floor o Specialty lighting • Office o Desk o Computer o Phone system (2 lines minimum) o Fax machine/Printer o High speed wireless router o File cabinet o Misc. office supplies • Conference/Board Room o Conference table (seating for 10) o Flip chart o Dry erase board o General o Misc. cleaning equipment (brooms, mops, etc.) o Snow shovel o Misc. tools Handicapped Accessibility
  23. 23. Wheelchair curling is becoming popular. Access to your club for wheelchair-bound members can open new league opportunities. It may also be a Federal regulation. Ramps may be required and multi-level structures may require an elevator. Carefully check regulations on this. Refrigeration Plant Refrigeration systems are rated in tons of capacity. Tons of capacity is different depending on the latitude (average temperatures) of your new club. A four sheet club at 42 degrees north will require approximately 15-17 tons of capacity per sheet to keep curling ice. More tonnage is desirable at ice making time when the plant is freezing multiple floods in September and October. During the season, the system will have to maintain a desired surface temperature. Staffing There are two staffing models in the curling club world. • Full time manager/ice person • Volunteer (member staffing) We know of clubs in Canada and the US that have a full time staff to manage the club and prepare the ice. We also know of clubs that are 4 and 5 sheets that have no paid employees. In either case, most clubs have a volunteer group to help out and the Board is generally made up of volunteers. Staffing Needs The ice is the most labor intensive area of club operations. To provide a proper playing surface, the ice must be cleaned, scraped and pebbled daily. This, combined with other ice duties takes about 30 minutes per sheet per day. Plan on maintaining ice at a four sheet club two hours per day. Ice technicians must be trained to scrape and pebble. Tending bar and managing food and liquor purchases is the next most labor intensive. Conceivably, one full time person can maintain the ice and manage the bar. The bar requires about 1 hour per day of work outside of bar tending. Club cleaning must take place every day as well. Member Recruiting Recruiting members is a difficult task. Every four years we have a huge opportunity to add members with very little recruiting. The Olympic curling coverage in the spring of 2002 and the spring 2006 proved to be valuable time for most curling clubs. During non-Olympic years, clubs must actively recruit members, train them and provide a fun league for them to play in. Member Training
  24. 24. Proper training will help retain curlers as they will be more proficient and are likely to enjoy the sport. This manual should be used as the training source material for your club. The United States Curling Association has downloadable training courses for use at your club. Committee Structure Your club will need several committees to oversee the key areas of club operations. Even with a paid staff, volunteers should oversee. Board of Directors Clubs work best when the members are involved with decisions. Since the entire membership can't meet periodically, a Board of Directors is necessary. Keep the numbers down on the Board. Overstaffing the Board can cause problems of scheduling and general lack of productivity during meetings. A Board of 5 to 9 people works best. The following is an example of a curling club Board. • President • Secretary • Treasurer • VP Ice • VP Club Operations • VP Membership • Regional Association Representative The following is a list of necessary committees: • Ice VP Ice • Bar VP Club Ops. • Kitchen VP Club Ops. • Membership VP Membership • Facility VP Club Ops. • Events VP Club Ops.
  25. 25. Section 15 Teaching Curling Training Philosophy Learning to curl should be fun for both students and instructors. Students will take away useful information from each clinic. All training methods and techniques will stress safety on and off the ice. Again - HAVE FUN Five Steps of Proper Training Step 1. Information Before learning can happen properly, steps must be taken to introduce the skill to the learner. This can be reviewing the web site, reading, video, discussion, etc. The important thing here is the new instructors must prepare the students properly. A discussion on the skill will always take place immediately before the demonstration. Step 2. Instructor Demonstration Students will do what you do. After they have been introduced to the skill, they must see it demonstrated properly. Find someone that can demonstrate properly. 3. Learner Trial Now is the time for the students to try the new skill. 4. Instructor Feedback As they continue to try the skill, constantly provide feedback. An additional demo may be necessary. 5. Practice Students get better by practicing the skill. A quick note on practice: We practice things to get better at something; sort of. The real reason we practice is to create a "default" skill. When anyone is asked to do something, they respond in a certain way, sometimes without even thinking about it. The default reaction comes from repetition of doing the action. It may or may not be correct or proper, but it is what we're accustomed to do. Training creates (in the case of a new curler) or changes a default behavior or skill. No curler will become proficient at curling unless they practice. In many cases, the league night is the only practice.
  26. 26. Example: A ten-year curler comes to you as an instructor looking for a proper release. He learns about the new release by reading, and then sees a proper demonstration at the clinic. He then demonstrates the new release perfectly. He's even asked to repeat it a few times. He leaves your clinic happy with his newly learned skill. The next night, he's forced to throw a difficult shot in the first end and guess what happens, his old release shows up and he misses the shot. What happened to his new release? Even though he learned a new release and showed he could do it, his "default" release was still the old one. In order for the new release to become the default, he needs to practice the new release properly over and over until it becomes instinct. How long will he have to practice to change his default? It's up to the individual. Some people have the ability to concentrate and override the default while others revert back quickly.
  27. 27. Appendix A Curling Terms & Lingo Some commonly used terms BITER A stone barely touching the 12-foot ring. BLANK END Neither team scores in the end. BONSPIEL A curling tournament. BURNED STONE A stone touched while in motion. BUTTON The smallest ring in the house. It is two feet in diameter, also called the "pot". BRUSH Broom CCA Canadian Curling Association CENTER GUARD A rock short and in the center of the sheet CORNER GUARD A rock short of the house and to the side DELIVERY The process of throwing a stone. DRAW A shot that comes to rest within the house. EIGHT END An end where all eight stones are counting END When sixteen stones have come to rest, similar to an inning in baseball. FREEZE A stone coming to rest touching another stone. FREE GUARD ZONE The area between the hog line and the tee line, excluding the house. FREE GUARD ZONE The rule that states that an opponent's rock cannot be RULE removed from play until four rocks have come to rest. GUARD A shot that comes to rest in front of another stone for protection. HACK The pieces of rubber you push off from at either end of the sheet. HAMMER The last shot of the end. HOGGER A shot that comes to rest short or on the hog line and is removed from play. HOG LINE The thick black line 33 feet from the hack. HOUSE The area within the outside circle at either end of the sheet.
  28. 28. HURRY! This means to sweep immediately. IN-TURN A stone that rotates clockwise for a right handed player. OUT-TURN A stone that rotates counter clock-wise for a right handed player. PEBBLE The frozen bumps on the ice that the stones ride on. PEEL A hard takeout designed to remove guards. RINK A curling team. RIGHT OFF Stop cleaning, we need a pick RUN BACK Driving a front rock back onto another SHEET The total playing area for one game. SKIP The captain of the team. SPINNER A rock thrown with excessive spin. STEAL Scoring a point without last rock advantage. TAKE-OUT A shot thrown hard enough to remove another stone from play. Also called a "HIT". TEE LINE The line that intersects the house at the center line. THE "TOSS" The toss of the coin to determine last rock in the first end. TICK Moving a rock a short distance with heavier weight USCA The United States Curling Association. The main offices are in Stevens Point, Wisconsin. WCF World Curling Federation WCT World Curling Tour WICK Running rock grazing a stationary rock There are other subtle curling terms that may be synonymous with the terms listed above. The more time you spend curling, the more you will hear them.
  29. 29. Curling Lingo "Hit the broom" A rock thrown accurately at the aiming point. "On the broom" Same as above. "Lost its handle" A rock that loses its rotation. "Nice rock" Good shot. "Nice Toss" Same as above. Tee weight A rock thrown hard enough to stop on the Tee Line. Back ring weight A rock thrown hard enough to stop in the back of the house. Draw the "lid" Draw to the button. Draw the "pin" Same as above. Hack weight A rock thrown hard enough to stop near the hack.. Normal hit A rock thrown hard enough to remove another rock from play. Heavy hit A rock thrown hard enough to forcefully remove a rock from play. "Split'em" Hitting a rock at such an angle as to split them apart. "You dumped it" A rock thrown inside the line of delivery, usually at the point of release. "You flipped it" A rock thrown outside the line of delivery, usually at the point of release "Take the rock" Sweep closest to the rock. "The rock picked" The moving rock picked up a piece of debris that altered its course. Weld A perfect freeze.
  30. 30. Appendix B Important Rules These are not the official rules. Some of them have been abbreviated for simplicity. If you live or play in Canada, you will play by the Canadian Rules. All others will play by the rules of the World Curling Federation. An official copy of the rules is available at your club or through your national association. Rocks: 1. If a rock is touched while it's in motion, it is called a burned rock. It is to be removed from play immediately. a. The person who burned the rock is the ONLY person that can call that shot burned (honor system). b. If the foul was committed inside the hog line, the opposing skip may put the fouled rock back in play if he/she thinks it would have been beneficial to their team. 2. The curling rock must be clearly released before the stone touches the nearer hog line. 3. A rock must come to rest beyond the farther hog line to be in play. 4. If a player accidentally throws the wrong color rock, the rock is replaced with the correct color. Sweeping: 1. Any number of sweepers can sweep their team's stone at one time as long as the stone is between the Tee Lines. 2. Only one person (any person) can sweep their rock behind the tee line. 3. The skip or acting skip can sweep an opponent's rock once it has touched the tee line. 4. The sweeping motion must be from side to side across the stone. The brush must cover the 5 inch running surface at all times and finish to the side so no debris is left in the path of the stone. Also, there must be clear and visible brush head movement. Position of Players: 1. Leads and seconds must position themselves between the hog lines unless throwing or sweeping a stone. 2. Only the skip and vice-skip are allowed to stand in and behind the house. 3. All players should position themselves as to not distract the opponent.
  31. 31. Ice Etiquette: 1. All players shake hands with your team and with your opponent BEFORE AND AFTER EACH GAME. 2. The vice-skip is responsible for scoring and measuring stones. 3. Each player on the team should be in position and ready to deliver stone when it is his/ her turn to throw. 4. There is no smoking on the ice. 5. Always wear clean shoes on the ice.
  32. 32. Appendix C Measuring Rocks Occasionally, two or more rocks are too close to measure by eye. Measuring the rocks by device will help. There are three types of measuring devices available at most clubs. The first and most often used device is simply called the "measure". It is used to determine the counting rock or rocks in the house. The second device is called the "six foot" measure. It is used to determine whether or not a rock is in the house. It is also used to determine if a rock is in play at the back of the house. Unlike the above device, it may be used during the end. There are only two reasons to use the six-foot measure during an end: 1. To determine if a rock, at the intersection of the back line and centerline, is in play. The back line overlaps the back of the house and if the lines were installed properly, a rock that is not within six feet of the center, it is not only out of the house, it's out of play. Free Guard Zone Measure 2. To determine if a rock is in the house. If the free guard zone rule is being played, it can be used during the first four rocks. The third measuring device is called the "90 degree" measure". It is an "L" shaped piece of metal use to determine if a rock is in play around the perimeter of the playing area. Measuring Procedures Vice skips are responsible for measuring rocks if necessary. The following is the correct procedure for measuring. Rocks are measured clockwise from the back of the house. This is the standard. Measuring Two Rocks • After retrieving the measuring device, enter the house from the back with the measuring point (the part that goes in the center hole) in your right hand. • You will measure rocks in a forward, clockwise direction to avoid "backing" into a rock and displacing it. Place the center point in the center hole and put the measuring device on the ice 90 - 180 degrees from the first rock to be measured. This allows you to place the device on the ice away from the rocks to be measured. • As you approach the first rock, determine if any adjustments are needed in the device and make them. • Measure the front of the first rock (never measure the back of the rock as rocks have different diameters), leave it in place and remember the reading on the device. • Slowly move the device clockwise to the next rock, putting no downward pressure on the device. • Measure the second rock and make a decision as to which one is closer. Move the second rock either in or out depending on the result and point to the closer rock for spectators. Measuring Three Rocks
  33. 33. • After retrieving the measuring device, enter the house from the back with the measuring point in your right hand. • You will measure rocks in a clockwise direction. Place the center point in the center hole and put the measuring device to the left of the odd-colored rock. • As you approach the odd-colored rock, determine if any adjustments are needed in the device and make them. • Measure the odd colored rock first and leave it in place. • Swing the device clockwise to the next rock and measure it. • After making the decision on the second rock, move it either in or out depending on the decision. Indicate with your hand the closer rock. • Move to the third rock and measure it. Again, move it in or out based on your decision. The first rock (odd-colored) will be your reference rock and should not be moved. • In both situations it is acceptable to swing the device back to the first rock for a closer look. If rocks cannot be determined by device, a blank end will result. This is very rare. • If two or more rocks are so close to the button that the device cannot be used, a decision must be made visually. Find an impartial person to do this for you. Using the Six-Foot Measure • Enter the house from the rear with the pointer in your right hand. • Place the six-foot pointer in the center hole and rest the device on the ice at 90-180 degrees from the first rock. • Slowly swing the device clockwise until it either contacts the rock or swings past it. Never throw the device at the rock as it may come out of the hole and displace the rock. • If, during a free guard zone measure, another rock is in the six-foot path, a decision must be made visually. Appendix D Forms The following forms may be useful to your curling program. • Delivery Analysis Forms • Game Planning Sheet • Rock Chart • Game Strategy Flow Chart Studio Rink Rental Some large arenas have studio rinks built to help with overflow figure skaters, broomball rentals and other events. If a studio rink is available, you may be able to rent it for a reduced rate.
  34. 34. Dedicated Facility Options Curling clubs across the world have many sizes and shapes. The one thing they all have in common are sheets of ice for curling. Clubs range in size from one sheet to dozens of sheets. Clubs of the 2-8 sheet variety are the most common. A facility can be made multi- use in the summer months by adding air conditioning and a concrete base. Attached Dedicate Curling Many large arenas and rinks have enough compressor capacity to run a few sheets of curling ice. This option allows a dedicated curling facility to start without a separate capital investment in the refrigeration equipment, site work, parking lot, etc. Stand-Alone Dedicated The preferred configuration is a dedicated curling club as a stand-alone structure. This provides ultimate control over operations. This configuration is the most expensive from a capital investment perspective as well as an operational perspective. In all dedicated facilities, a multi-use configuration helps. Curling in the summer is cost prohibitive due to high electricity costs. It's not out of the question but you'll need a fairly dedicated group to pay the electric bill. Summer facility rentals of the warm room and bar area can provide needed revenue to pay annual expenses. Weddings and other similar events can utilize your kitchen and bar area. Air conditioning and a concrete base are multi-use necessities. Municipal Partnerships Some municipalities are open to partnership ideas. Curling provides a unique offering to any parks or recreation program. In some cases, cities and towns will provide land at no or low cost in order to provide curling to the community. Normally, an agreement is made to offer curling through the town recreation program. Club Size Before designing the new club, consider how many curlers you will have. This is a difficult exercise especially in areas where there is little or no existing curling. Club capacity is based on the number of sheets of ice. Work with this rule of thumb: One hundred members for each sheet of ice. Member demographics will drive that number up or down. The capacity of a large metro area clubs can be lower due to the lack of daytime curling. Club Layout and Design Designing a club is like designing a new house. There are many different styles. The areas of major consideration are the warm room, the ice shed, locker rooms, compressor
  35. 35. room and restrooms. The following is a list of things to consider in the design of a dedicated facility. Overall Layout Considerations The following are suggestions for a curling facility. Carefully research each idea for viability. Clubs in the northern hemisphere are best laid out from north to south, with the warm room end facing north. The ice shed home-end is warmed by the warm room walls and glass. To compensate, the ice shed away-end should receive southern exposure of the sun on the building. The building entrance path must not cross the ice entry path. Players moving from the warm room to the ice and from the locker rooms to the ice should never cross the traffic area from the building entrance. This will track dirt, salt and chemicals onto the ice. A heated front walkway is a great idea. This eliminates the need for salting near the front door and never requires shoveling. • Warm Room Considerations o Bar area o Coat closet near entrance o Supply closet/room o Recreation area for billiards, game table, etc. o Television area o Restrooms outside the locker rooms o Fireplace o Kitchen o Office o Several phone locations o Meeting space (Board meetings, committee meetings, club rentals, etc.) o Bulletin Board area o Curling supply store area o Stepped area near glass for staggered viewing o Central vacuum o Handicapped ramps or elevator o PA system piped to all areas of the club o Refrigeration plant enunciator (little lights) monitoring area • Ice Shed Considerations o Playing surface grade. The ice surface should 5-6 feet lower than the warroom for best viewing.
  36. 36. o Concrete base o Odd sheet number provides championship/TV sheet in center o Sheet size (15' 7") o Low ceiling height o Heat and dehumidification duct work o Shed insulation o Epoxy painted rings on concrete o Maintenance/Compressor room access o Scraper cold-storage area o Sheet scaling (building for 7 sheets but only using 5, or 5 to use 3) o Sheet border carpet o Light-ring telephone on-ice o Ice access restrooms (optional) • Locker Room Considerations o Capacity should be one complete draw (number of sheets times 8) o Locker types (should be tall enough for a broom) o Benches (members should be able to sit and change shoes in front of their locker) o Minimum two toilets for men, three for women) o Showers (optional) o Broom bag storage above lockers o Ice access directly from the locker rooms • Compressor Room Considerations o Easy access from ice o Heated snow pit (melts scraper snow) o Deionized water and water heater station for pebbling o Work bench and tool area o Heat exchange from condenser discharge o Fractional surface temperature control Facility Design Essentials The following items are the "must have" items for your new facility. They are all ice and field of play related. When you discuss the options for new facility and begin to allocate funds, include these items first. Your club is first and foremost about curling. Spending extra money on your warm room is great but only after these items are covered. Even novice curlers enjoy the game more on a good playing surface. Fast, true ice allows all skill levels, including juniors to make shots more consistently. To have great ice, you need a properly designed and equipped ice shed and a competent ice technician. This will allow ease of ice prep for all leagues and levels. Odd Number of Sheets
  37. 37. When deciding how many sheets to build, your potential membership numbers will dictate. Capacity, long term is the main consideration. Once you have determined your capacity needs, think about an odd number of sheets. We recommend never building less than four sheets. If you've decided on four then consider moving up to five. An odd number provides a "center sheet". This can be surrounded by carpeted walkways for high presentation value. The championship sheet can used for championship games, televised games, club championship, etc. This is where a prominent logo or sponsor logo will go. National championships, Olympic Trials, Mixed, Juniors etc, are usually round robin events with ten teams. Five sheets minimum is necessary to host these events. Concrete Base A concrete base (as opposed to sand) in your ice shed is essential for making and maintaining ice. It allows the ice tech to easily make ice at the beginning of the season without requiring the help of too many people. With the rings and lines epoxy painted on the concrete, an ice tech can make ice from scratch in 2-3 days. This will save on electricity and allow the club to make ice for summer bonspiels. Concrete also provides an even temperature control on the surface. The cooling pipes are embedded in the concrete by several inches and about four inches apart (on center). The mass of the concrete will dissipate the cooling properties evenly between the pipes resulting in a perfecting level surface above it. In contrast, a sand base does not have the mass of concrete and will "pull" heat unevenly with more cooling over the feed pipes and less over the returns and dead space. This causes "pipe runs" on the surface which are slight depressions over the return pipes. This is not level and requires much more ice maintenance than concrete. Sound quality in the shed is also better with concrete. Rocks run quieter instead of the low rumble caused by sand over and insulated base. Insulation, Heat and Dehumidification Proper climate control is necessary to control moisture. Allowing moisture in your building will cause frost on the ice surface requiring more time and energy to prepare the ice. Frost causes rocks to run straight. Choose a quality system that will provide heat and dehumidification. Heat exchangers using heat from the refrigeration plant can be very energy efficient. Your club's coordinates (position latitude) will dictate how much dehumidification you need. Low Shed Ceiling A low ceiling in the shed will reduce the volume of air to be controlled, making it more energy efficient. Sound from screaming skips is also reduced. Radiant Heat Curtain
  38. 38. Your ice surface is being bombarded by radiant heat from the sun through the roof, even on cloudy days. Placing a radiant heat barrier under your roof will greatly reduce the radiant heat on your ice surface. This in turn allows the compressor to cycle less to maintain your surface temperature. Compressor Capacity and Cycling A properly fitted compressor will allow your ice tech to make ice in a short period of time. It will also "pull" heat faster when large heat loads are placed on the ice. Heat loads include heaters, players, lights, etc. (television lights add an enormous load). Compressor cycling should be controlled in tenth of a degree to maintain your desired surface temperature. Financial Overview Unfortunately, financial information for brand new clubs is limited. Clubs are generally formed by a small group of dedicated curlers in a certain area. Very few clubs have been completed from scratch in the last 30 years. In many cases, new facilities are the result of existing clubs rebuilding. The following is a skeleton annual cash flow statement of a new club with 6 sheets. This club has a full time manager/ice person. A one million dollar start-up costs is categorized as follows; the land is purchased at 250,000, the structure built for $500,000 and equipment at 250,000 financed at 60%. Use the following numbers as a guideline and adjust as necessary.
  39. 39. Fully Staffed Club Revenues Memberships Dues 300 members X $400 $120,000 Bar Revenue $40,000 Club Rental $5,000 Bonspiel Revenue $20,000 Total Revenue $185.000 Cost of Goods Sold Bar goods $25,000 Expenses Utilities $25,000 Insurance $10,000 Real Estate Taxes $13,000 Snow Removal $5,000 Club Manager/Ice $40,000 Payroll Taxes $8,000 Principle & Interest $40,000 Misc. $19,000 Total Expenses 185,000 Gross Cash Flow $0,00 You can see that is a break-even scenario. These numbers are VERY rough. They should be used as directional only.
  40. 40. Working these numbers can be a fun exercise. Membership can really drive the numbers. This example has half of capacity of the club as members. Obviously, the key factors are the land and building costs, amount of initial capital and the full time manager. Substitute donated land, more capital, no manager (volunteer based), more members, higher dues, etc. Driving the revenue items can dramatically increase cash flow. Occupancy costs (mortgage, rent, real estate taxes, etc.) will stay fixed. Utilities will be a semi variable cost, increasing only with added draws during the day. Club rental is a popular source of additional revenue. Daytime rentals for off-site corporate meetings can draw $500 for an afternoon, not including bar revenue. Volunteer-Based Club (no payroll and payroll taxes) Revenues Memberships Dues 300 members X $400 $120,000 Bar Revenue $40,000 Club Rental $5,000 Total Revenue $165.000 Cost of Goods Sold Bar goods $20,000 Expenses Utilities $25,000 Insurance $10,000 Real Estate Taxes $13,000 Snow Removal $5,000 Principle & Interest $40,000 Misc. $4,000 Total Expenses $117,000 Gross Cash Flow $48,000
  41. 41. Equipment • Ice/Shed Related o Two 25 ton compressors, condenser, chiller, brine pumps, or, o Three 20 ton compressors o Fractional controller (.10 of a degree) o Cordless scraper with 5' blade o Hand scraper o Scoreboards o Twelve trash bins o Stiff bristle 6 foot broom o Soft sheep skin 6-foot broom o Misc. shovels and brooms o Two measuring devices o Two six foot measures o Paint sprayer with pump o Pebbler with pebble head o Hot water heater for pebble o Deionized water system o Dedicated ice mop and bucket • Kitchen o Commercial range with grill o Exhaust hood o Dishwasher o Coffee grinder and brewer o Commercial walk-in refrigerator/freezer o Microwave o Misc. serving and cookware o Food prep sink and disposer o Hand sink o Fryer (optional) • Bar o Dishwasher o Ice maker o Lockable bottle cooler o Keg refrigerator o Taps o Glassware o Cash register
  42. 42. • Warm Room o Sheet monitors for away end o One round table and chairs (8) for each sheet of ice o Two soft couches o Two soft chairs o Two tables o PA/Music system o 50" flat screen television (optional) o 9' Pool table (optional) o Meeting table and chairs o Fireplace grill and equipment o Display case o Food serving table o Dance floor o Specialty lighting • Office o Desk o Computer o Phone system (2 lines minimum) o Fax machine/Printer o High speed wireless router o File cabinet o Misc. office supplies • Conference/Board Room o Conference table (seating for 10) o Flip chart o Dry erase board o General o Misc. cleaning equipment (brooms, mops, etc.) o Snow shovel o Misc. tools
  43. 43. Handicapped Accessibility Wheelchair curling is becoming popular. Access to your club for wheelchair-bound members can open new league opportunities. It may also be a Federal regulation. Ramps may be required and multi-level structures may require an elevator. Carefully check regulations on this. Refrigeration Plant Refrigeration systems are rated in tons of capacity. Tons of capacity is different depending on the latitude (average temperatures) of your new club. A four sheet club at 42 degrees north will require approximately 15-17 tons of capacity per sheet to keep curling ice. More tonnage is desirable at ice making time when the plant is freezing multiple floods in September and October. During the season, the system will have to maintain a desired surface temperature. Staffing There are two staffing models in the curling club world. • Full time manager/ice person • Volunteer (member staffing) We know of clubs in Canada and the US that have a full time staff to manage the club and prepare the ice. We also know of clubs that are 4 and 5 sheets that have no paid employees. In either case, most clubs have a volunteer group to help out and the Board is generally made up of volunteers. Staffing Needs The ice is the most labor intensive area of club operations. To provide a proper playing surface, the ice must be cleaned, scraped and pebbled daily. This, combined with other ice duties takes about 30 minutes per sheet per day. Plan on maintaining ice at a four sheet club two hours per day. Ice technicians must be trained to scrape and pebble. Tending bar and managing food and liquor purchases is the next most labor intensive. Conceivably, one full time person can maintain the ice and manage the bar. The bar requires about 1 hour per day of work outside of bar tending. Club cleaning must take place every day as well. Member Recruiting Recruiting members is a difficult task. Every four years we have a huge opportunity to add members with very little recruiting. The Olympic curling coverage in the spring of 2002 and the spring 2006 proved to be valuable time for most curling clubs.
  44. 44. During non-Olympic years, clubs must actively recruit members, train them and provide a fun league for them to play in. Member Training Proper training will help retain curlers as they will be more proficient and are likely to enjoy the sport. This manual should be used as the training source material for your club. The United States Curling Association has downloadable training courses for use at your club. Committee Structure Your club will need several committees to oversee the key areas of club operations. Even with a paid staff, volunteers should oversee. Board of Directors Clubs work best when the members are involved with decisions. Since the entire membership can't meet periodically, a Board of Directors is necessary. Keep the numbers down on the Board. Overstaffing the Board can cause problems of scheduling and general lack of productivity during meetings. A Board of 5 to 9 people works best. The following is an example of a curling club Board. • President • Secretary • Treasurer • VP Ice • VP Club Operations • VP Membership • Regional Association Representative The following is a list of necessary committees: • Ice VP Ice • Bar VP Club Ops. • Kitchen VP Club Ops. • Membership VP Membership • Facility VP Club Ops. • Events VP Club Ops.
  45. 45. Section 15 Teaching Curling Training Philosophy Learning to curl should be fun for both students and instructors. Students will take away useful information from each clinic. All training methods and techniques will stress safety on and off the ice. Again - HAVE FUN Five Steps of Proper Training Step 1. Information Before learning can happen properly, steps must be taken to introduce the skill to the learner. This can be reviewing the web site, reading, video, discussion, etc. The important thing here is the new instructors must prepare the students properly. A discussion on the skill will always take place immediately before the demonstration. Step 2. Instructor Demonstration Students will do what you do. After they have been introduced to the skill, they must see it demonstrated properly. Find someone that can demonstrate properly. 3. Learner Trial Now is the time for the students to try the new skill. 4. Instructor Feedback As they continue to try the skill, constantly provide feedback. An additional demo may be necessary. 5. Practice Students get better by practicing the skill. A quick note on practice: We practice things to get better at something; sort of. The real reason we practice is to create a "default" skill. When anyone is asked to do something, they respond in a certain way, sometimes without even thinking about it. The default reaction comes from repetition of doing the action. It may or may not be correct or proper, but it is what we're accustomed to do. Training creates (in the case of a new curler) or changes a default behavior or skill. No curler will become proficient at curling unless they practice. In many cases, the league night is the only practice.
  46. 46. Example: A ten-year curler comes to you as an instructor looking for a proper release. He learns about the new release by reading, and then sees a proper demonstration at the clinic. He then demonstrates the new release perfectly. He's even asked to repeat it a few times. He leaves your clinic happy with his newly learned skill. The next night, he's forced to throw a difficult shot in the first end and guess what happens, his old release shows up and he misses the shot. What happened to his new release? Even though he learned a new release and showed he could do it, his "default" release was still the old one. In order for the new release to become the default, he needs to practice the new release properly over and over until it becomes instinct. How long will he have to practice to change his default? It's up to the individual. Some people have the ability to concentrate and override the default while others revert back quickly.
  47. 47. Appendix A Curling Terms & Lingo Some commonly used terms BITER A stone barely touching the 12-foot ring. BLANK END Neither team scores in the end. BONSPIEL A curling tournament. BURNED STONE A stone touched while in motion. BUTTON The smallest ring in the house. It is two feet in diameter, also called the "pot". BRUSH Broom CCA Canadian Curling Association CENTER GUARD A rock short and in the center of the sheet CORNER GUARD A rock short of the house and to the side DELIVERY The process of throwing a stone. DRAW A shot that comes to rest within the house. EIGHT END An end where all eight stones are counting END When sixteen stones have come to rest, similar to an inning in baseball. FREEZE A stone coming to rest touching another stone. FREE GUARD ZONE The area between the hog line and the tee line, excluding the house. FREE GUARD ZONE The rule that states that an opponent's rock cannot be RULE removed from play until four rocks have come to rest. GUARD A shot that comes to rest in front of another stone for protection. HACK The pieces of rubber you push off from at either end of the sheet. HAMMER The last shot of the end. HOGGER A shot that comes to rest short or on the hog line and is removed from play.
  48. 48. HOG LINE The thick black line 33 feet from the hack. HOUSE The area within the outside circle at either end of the sheet. HURRY! This means to sweep immediately. IN-TURN A stone that rotates clockwise for a right handed player. OUT-TURN A stone that rotates counter clock-wise for a right handed player. PEBBLE The frozen bumps on the ice that the stones ride on. PEEL A hard takeout designed to remove guards. RINK A curling team. RIGHT OFF Stop cleaning, we need a pick RUN BACK Driving a front rock back onto another SHEET The total playing area for one game. SKIP The captain of the team. SPINNER A rock thrown with excessive spin. STEAL Scoring a point without last rock advantage. TAKE-OUT A shot thrown hard enough to remove another stone from play. Also called a "HIT". TEE LINE The line that intersects the house at the center line. THE "TOSS" The toss of the coin to determine last rock in the first end. TICK Moving a rock a short distance with heavier weight USCA The United States Curling Association. The main offices are in Stevens Point, Wisconsin. WCF World Curling Federation WCT World Curling Tour WICK Running rock grazing a stationary rock There are other subtle curling terms that may be synonymous with the terms listed above. The more time you spend curling, the more you will hear them.
  49. 49. Curling Lingo "Hit the broom" A rock thrown accurately at the aiming point. "On the broom" Same as above. "Lost its handle" A rock that loses its rotation. "Nice rock" Good shot. "Nice Toss" Same as above. Tee weight A rock thrown hard enough to stop on the Tee Line. Back ring weight A rock thrown hard enough to stop in the back of the house. Draw the "lid" Draw to the button. Draw the "pin" Same as above. Hack weight A rock thrown hard enough to stop near the hack.. Normal hit A rock thrown hard enough to remove another rock from play. Heavy hit A rock thrown hard enough to forcefully remove a rock from play. "Split'em" Hitting a rock at such an angle as to split them apart. "You dumped it" A rock thrown inside the line of delivery, usually at the point of release. "You flipped it" A rock thrown outside the line of delivery, usually at the point of release "Take the rock" Sweep closest to the rock. "The rock picked" The moving rock picked up a piece of debris that altered its course. Weld A perfect freeze.
  50. 50. Appendix B Important Rules These are not the official rules. Some of them have been abbreviated for simplicity. If you live or play in Canada, you will play by the Canadian Rules. All others will play by the rules of the World Curling Federation. An official copy of the rules is available at your club or through your national association. Rocks: 1. If a rock is touched while it's in motion, it is called a burned rock. It is to be removed from play immediately. a. The person who burned the rock is the ONLY person that can call that shot burned (honor system). b. If the foul was committed inside the hog line, the opposing skip may put the fouled rock back in play if he/she thinks it would have been beneficial to their team. 2. The curling rock must be clearly released before the stone touches the nearer hog line. 3. A rock must come to rest beyond the farther hog line to be in play. 4. If a player accidentally throws the wrong color rock, the rock is replaced with the correct color. Sweeping: 1. Any number of sweepers can sweep their team's stone at one time as long as the stone is between the Tee Lines. 2. Only one person (any person) can sweep their rock behind the tee line. 3. The skip or acting skip can sweep an opponent's rock once it has touched the tee line. 4. The sweeping motion must be from side to side across the stone. The brush must cover the 5 inch running surface at all times and finish to the side so no debris is left in the path of the stone. Also, there must be clear and visible brush head movement. Position of Players: 1. Leads and seconds must position themselves between the hog lines unless throwing or sweeping a stone. 2. Only the skip and vice-skip are allowed to stand in and behind the house.
  51. 51. 3. All players should position themselves as to not distract the opponent. Ice Etiquette: 1. All players shake hands with your team and with your opponent BEFORE AND AFTER EACH GAME. 2. The vice-skip is responsible for scoring and measuring stones. 3. Each player on the team should be in position and ready to deliver stone when it is his/ her turn to throw. 4. There is no smoking on the ice. 5. Always wear clean shoes on the ice.
  52. 52. Appendix C Measuring Rocks Occasionally, two or more rocks are too close to measure by eye. Measuring the rocks by device will help. There are three types of measuring devices available at most clubs. The first and most often used device is simply called the "measure". It is used to determine the counting rock or rocks in the house. The second device is called the "six foot" measure. It is used to determine whether or not a rock is in the house. It is also used to determine if a rock is in play at the back of the house. Unlike the above device, it may be used during the end. There are only two reasons to use the six-foot measure during an end: 1. To determine if a rock, at the intersection of the back line and centerline, is in play. The back line overlaps the back of the house and if the lines were installed properly, a rock that is not within six feet of the center, it is not only out of the house, it's out of play. Free Guard Zone Measure 2. To determine if a rock is in the house. If the free guard zone rule is being played, it can be used during the first four rocks. The third measuring device is called the "90 degree" measure". It is an "L" shaped piece of metal use to determine if a rock is in play around the perimeter of the playing area. Measuring Procedures Vice skips are responsible for measuring rocks if necessary. The following is the correct procedure for measuring. Rocks are measured clockwise from the back of the house. This is the standard. Measuring Two Rocks • After retrieving the measuring device, enter the house from the back with the measuring point (the part that goes in the center hole) in your right hand. • You will measure rocks in a forward, clockwise direction to avoid "backing" into a rock and displacing it. Place the center point in the center hole and put the measuring device on the ice 90 - 180 degrees from the first rock to be measured. This allows you to place the device on the ice away from the rocks to be measured. • As you approach the first rock, determine if any adjustments are needed in the device and make them. • Measure the front of the first rock (never measure the back of the rock as rocks have different diameters), leave it in place and remember the reading on the device. • Slowly move the device clockwise to the next rock, putting no downward pressure on the device.
  53. 53. • Measure the second rock and make a decision as to which one is closer. Move the second rock either in or out depending on the result and point to the closer rock for spectators. Measuring Three Rocks • After retrieving the measuring device, enter the house from the back with the measuring point in your right hand. • You will measure rocks in a clockwise direction. Place the center point in the center hole and put the measuring device to the left of the odd-colored rock. • As you approach the odd-colored rock, determine if any adjustments are needed in the device and make them. • Measure the odd colored rock first and leave it in place. • Swing the device clockwise to the next rock and measure it. • After making the decision on the second rock, move it either in or out depending on the decision. Indicate with your hand the closer rock. • Move to the third rock and measure it. Again, move it in or out based on your decision. The first rock (odd-colored) will be your reference rock and should not be moved. • In both situations it is acceptable to swing the device back to the first rock for a closer look. If rocks cannot be determined by device, a blank end will result. This is very rare. • If two or more rocks are so close to the button that the device cannot be used, a decision must be made visually. Find an impartial person to do this for you. Using the Six-Foot Measure • Enter the house from the rear with the pointer in your right hand. • Place the six-foot pointer in the center hole and rest the device on the ice at 90-180 degrees from the first rock. • Slowly swing the device clockwise until it either contacts the rock or swings past it. Never throw the device at the rock as it may come out of the hole and displace the rock. • If, during a free guard zone measure, another rock is in the six-foot path, a decision must be made visually. Appendix D Forms The following forms may be useful to your curling program. • Delivery Analysis Forms • Game Planning Sheet • Rock Chart • Game Strategy Flow Chart following is the correct procedure for measuring. Rocks are measured clockwise from the back of the house. This is the standard.
  54. 54. Measuring Two Rocks • After retrieving the measuring device, enter the house from the back with the measuring point (the part that goes in the center hole) in your right hand. • You will measure rocks in a forward, clockwise direction to avoid "backing" into a rock and displacing it. Place the center point in the center hole and put the measuring device on the ice 90 - 180 degrees from the first rock to be measured. This allows you to place the device on the ice away from the rocks to be measured. • As you approach the first rock, determine if any adjustments are needed in the device and make them. • Measure the front of the first rock (never measure the back of the rock as rocks have different diameters), leave it in place and remember the reading on the device. • Slowly move the device clockwise to the next rock, putting no downward pressure on the device. • Measure the second rock and make a decision as to which one is closer. Move the second rock either in or out depending on the result and point to the closer rock for spectators. Measuring Three Rocks • After retrieving the measuring device, enter the house from the back with the measuring point in your right hand. • You will measure rocks in a clockwise direction. Place the center point in the center hole and put the measuring device to the left of the odd-colored rock. • As you approach the odd-colored rock, determine if any adjustments are needed in the device and make them. • Measure the odd colored rock first and leave it in place. • Swing the device clockwise to the next rock and measure it. • After making the decision on the second rock, move it either in or out depending on the decision. Indicate with your hand the closer rock. • Move to the third rock and measure it. Again, move it in or out based on your decision. The first rock (odd-colored) will be your reference rock and should not be moved. • In both situations it is acceptable to swing the device back to the first rock for a closer look. If rocks cannot be determined by device, a blank end will result. This is very rare. • If two or more rocks are so close to the button that the device cannot be used, a decision must be made visually. Find an impartial person to do this for you. Using the Six-Foot Measure • Enter the house from the rear with the pointer in your right hand. • Place the six-foot pointer in the center hole and rest the device on the ice at 90-180 degrees from the first rock. • Slowly swing the device clockwise until it either contacts the rock or swings past it. Never throw the device at the rock as it may come out of the hole and displace the rock.
  55. 55. • If, during a free guard zone measure, another rock is in the six-foot path, a decision must be made visually. Appendix D Forms The following forms may be useful to your curling program. • Delivery Analysis Forms • Game Planning Sheet • Rock Chart • Game Strategy Flow Chart Studio Rink Rental Some large arenas have studio rinks built to help with overflow figure skaters, broomball rentals and other events. If a studio rink is available, you may be able to rent it for a reduced rate. Dedicated Facility Options Curling clubs across the world have many sizes and shapes. The one thing they all have in common are sheets of ice for curling. Clubs range in size from one sheet to dozens of sheets. Clubs of the 2-8 sheet variety are the most common. A facility can be made multi- use in the summer months by adding air conditioning and a concrete base. Attached Dedicate Curling Many large arenas and rinks have enough compressor capacity to run a few sheets of curling ice. This option allows a dedicated curling facility to start without a separate capital investment in the refrigeration equipment, site work, parking lot, etc. Stand-Alone Dedicated The preferred configuration is a dedicated curling club as a stand-alone structure. This provides ultimate control over operations. This configuration is the most expensive from a capital investment perspective as well as an operational perspective. In all dedicated facilities, a multi-use configuration helps. Curling in the summer is cost prohibitive due to high electricity costs. It's not out of the question but you'll need a fairly dedicated group to pay the electric bill. Summer facility rentals of the warm room and bar area can provide needed revenue to pay annual expenses. Weddings and other similar events can utilize your kitchen and bar area. Air conditioning and a concrete base are multi-use necessities. Municipal Partnerships

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