0
Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl By: Harriet Jacobs
The Life of a Slave <ul><li>“ Who knows the ways of God?” said she. “Perhaps they have been kindly taken from the evil day...
<ul><li>“ Where the laughter is not mirth; nor thought the mind;  </li></ul><ul><li>Nor words a language; nor e’en men man...
A Breaking Point: Run? Stay? <ul><li>“ Reader, did you ever hate? I hope not. I never did but once; and I trust I never sh...
A female slave’s destiny: Girl to Woman <ul><li>“ During the first years of my service in Dr. Flint's family, I was accust...
Tragic Misconceptions <ul><li>“ I have spoken of the pains slaveholders take to give their slaves a bad opinion of the nor...
Slaveholder’s Pride <ul><li>“ There was a planter in the country, not far from us, whom I will call Mr. Litch. He was an i...
Plantation Lifestyle <ul><li>“ But even those large, venomous snakes were less dreadful to my imagination than the white m...
Sacrifice <ul><li>Linda was forced to be a prisoner among her family by hiding in her grandmothers home; seen by only few ...
Freedom <ul><li>“ For the last time I went up to my nook. Its desolate appearance no longer chilled me, for the light of h...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

American Lit Ii Incidents In The Life Of A Slave Girl

1,398

Published on

Published in: Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,398
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
13
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Transcript of "American Lit Ii Incidents In The Life Of A Slave Girl"

  1. 1. Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl By: Harriet Jacobs
  2. 2. The Life of a Slave <ul><li>“ Who knows the ways of God?” said she. “Perhaps they have been kindly taken from the evil days to come.” – Chapter II The New Master And Mistress (18) </li></ul><ul><li>The life of a slave was dreary, hopeless, and unbearable. The moment of birth, a slave is a slave; judged by all of a lighter hue. Their view of life is skewed and perhaps unforgiving at times. In the story, “Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl,” Linda describes a story that many other slaves have experienced and witnessed. The author creates a mental image and emotional struggle, which the audience will never forget. </li></ul><ul><li>“ I shall never forget that night. Never before, in my life, had I heard hundreds of blows fall, in succession, on a human being. His piteous groans, and his “O, pray don’t, massa,” rang in my ear for months afterwards. There were many conjectures as to the cause of this terrible punishment. Some said master accused him of stealing corn; others said the slave had quarreled with his wife, in presence of the overseer, and had accused his master of being the father of her child. They were both black, and the child was very fair” – Chapter II The New Master And Mistress (23) </li></ul><ul><li>“ Her sufferings, afterwards, became so intense, that her mistress felt unable to say; but when she left the room, the scornful smile was still on her lips. Seven children called her mother. The poor black woman had but the one child, whose eyes she saw closing in death, while she thanked God for taking her away from the greater bitterness of life.” Chapter II The New Master And Mistress (25) </li></ul>
  3. 3. <ul><li>“ Where the laughter is not mirth; nor thought the mind; </li></ul><ul><li>Nor words a language; nor e’en men mankind. </li></ul><ul><li>Where cries reply to curses, shrieks to blows, </li></ul><ul><li>And each is tortured in his separate hell.” – Chapter VII The Lover (58) </li></ul><ul><li>“ Forgive me for what, mother? For not letting him treat me like a dog? No! I will never humble myself to him. I have worked for him for nothing all my life, and I am repaid with stripes and imprisonment. Here I will stay till I die, or till he sells me.” – Chapter IV The Slave Who Dared to Feel Like A Man (36 ) </li></ul><ul><li>“ There are no bonds so strong as those which are formed by suffering together” – Chapter XXXIII A Home Found (257) </li></ul><ul><li>A slave valued the importance of family and the sacred bond that they shared among their struggles. Family prevailed over many hopeless moments, and helped to heal the scars of slavery. At times, many were deceived with negative exaggerations of freedom, and even the church could not relate to the pain and degradation of being a slave. </li></ul><ul><li>“ What does he know of the half-starved wretches toiling from dawn till dark on the plantations? of mothers shrieking for their children, torn from their arms by slave traders? of young girls dragged down into moral filth? of pools of blood around the whipping post? of hounds trained to tear human flesh? of men screwed into cotton gins to die? The slaveholder showed him none of these things, and the slaves dared not tell of them if he had asked them.” –Chapter XIII The Church And Slavery (114) </li></ul>
  4. 4. A Breaking Point: Run? Stay? <ul><li>“ Reader, did you ever hate? I hope not. I never did but once; and I trust I never shall again. Somebody has called it, “the atmosphere of hell;” and I believe it is so.” – Chapter VII The Lover (63) </li></ul><ul><li>Linda was forced to witness and experience tragedy at an early age. She may have been scarred and delusional at times from her severe suffering and unhealthy living conditions. She fought with the idea of running, to escape her horrific lifestyle. However, through consistent pain and suffering, she managed to develop a perspective relating to all mankind and not just black people; amazingly unselfish. </li></ul><ul><li>“ You may believe what I say; for I write only that whereof I know. I was twenty-one years in that cage of obscene birds. I can testify, from my own experience and observation, that slavery is a curse to the whites as well as to the blacks. It makes the white fathers cruel and sensual; the sons violent and licentious; it contaminates the daughters, and makes the wives wretched. And as for the colored race, it needs an abler pen than mine to describe the extremity of their sufferings, the depth of their degradation. Yet few slaveholders seem to be aware of the widespread moral ruin occasioned by this wicked system. Their talk is of blighted cotton crops--not of the blight on their children's souls. If you want to be fully convinced of the abominations of slavery, go on a southern plantation, and call yourself a negro trader. Then there will be no concealment; and you will see and hear things that will seem to you impossible among human beings with immortal souls.” – Chapter IX Sketches Of Neighboring Slaveholders (81) </li></ul>
  5. 5. A female slave’s destiny: Girl to Woman <ul><li>“ During the first years of my service in Dr. Flint's family, I was accustomed to share some indulgences with the children of my mistress. Though this seemed to me no more than right, I was grateful for it, and tried to merit the kindness by the faithful discharge of my duties. But I now entered on my fifteenth year--a sad epoch in the life of a slave girl. My master began to whisper foul words in my ear. Young as I was, I could not remain ignorant of their import. I tried to treat them with indifference or contempt. The master's age, my extreme youth, and the fear that his conduct would be reported to my grandmother, made him bear this treatment for many months. He was a crafty man, and resorted to many means to accomplish his purposes. Sometimes he had stormy, terrific ways, that made his victims tremble; sometimes he assumed a gentleness that he thought must surely subdue. Of the two, I preferred his stormy moods, although they left me trembling. He tried his utmost to corrupt the pure principles my grandmother had instilled. He peopled my young mind with unclean images, such as only a vile monster could think of. I turned from him with disgust and hatred. But he was my master. I was compelled to live under the same roof with him--where I saw a man forty years my senior daily violating the most sacred commandments of nature. He told me I was his property; that I must be subject to his will in all things” –Chapter V The Trials of Girlhood (44-45) </li></ul><ul><li>Many black woman were forced to engage in demeaning promiscuous acts with their master, creating the seed of a newborn. This created more pain, fear, and resentment among many female slaves; to give birth to a future slave. </li></ul><ul><li>“ The little vine was taking deep root in my existence, though its clinging fondness excited a mixture of love and pain.”- Chapter XI The New Tie To Life (96) </li></ul><ul><li>“ No pen can give an adequate description of the all pervading corruption produced by slavery. The slave girl is reared in an atmosphere of licentiousness and fear. The lash and the foul talk of her master and his sons are her teachers. When she is fourteen or fifteen, her owner, or his sons, or the overseer, or perhaps all of them, begin to bribe her with presents. If these fail to accomplish their purpose, she is whipped or starved into submission to their will. She may have had religious principles inculcated by some pious mother or grandmother, or some good mistress; she may have a lover, whose good opinion and peace of mind are dear to her heart; or the profligate men who have power over her may be exceedingly odious to her. But resistance is hopeless.” – Chapter IX Sketches of Neighboring Slaveholders (80) </li></ul>
  6. 6. Tragic Misconceptions <ul><li>“ I have spoken of the pains slaveholders take to give their slaves a bad opinion of the north; but, notwithstanding this, intelligent slaves are aware that they have many friends in the Free States. Even the most ignorant have some confused notions about it. They knew that I could read; and I was often asked if I had seen any thing in the newspapers about white folks over in the big north, who were trying to get their freedom for them. Some believe that the abolitionists have already made them free, and that it is established by law, but that their masters prevent the law from going into effect. One woman begged me to get a newspaper and read it over. She said her husband told her that the black people had sent word to the queen of 'Merica that they were all slaves; that she didn't believe it, and went to Washington city to see the president about it. They quarreled; she drew her sword upon him, and swore that he should help her to make them all free. That poor, ignorant woman thought that America was governed by a Queen, to whom the President was subordinate. I wish the President was subordinate to Queen Justice.” –Chapter VIII What Slaves Are Taught To Think Of The North (81-82) </li></ul><ul><li>Many slaveholders deceived their slaves by creating absurd stories of the free states and the unbearable conditions the runaways faced with choosing freedom over slavery. The slaveholders knew that an educated black slave would only harm the cycle of slavery, and perhaps create a sense of bravery and usefulness among ‘their kind.’ Linda portrayed this bravery and intelligence. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Slaveholder’s Pride <ul><li>“ There was a planter in the country, not far from us, whom I will call Mr. Litch. He was an ill-bred, uneducated man, but very wealthy. He had six hundred slaves, many of whom he did not know by sight. His extensive plantation was managed by well-paid overseers. There was a jail and a whipping post on his grounds; and whatever cruelties were perpetrated there, they passed without comment. He was so effectually screened by his great wealth that he was called to no account for his crimes, not even for murder.” – Chapter IX Sketches Of Neighboring Slaveholders (72) </li></ul><ul><li>“ Cruelty is contagious in uncivilized communities. Mr. Conant, a neighbor of Mr. Litch, returned from town one evening in a partial state of intoxication. His body servant gave him some offence. He was divested of his clothes, except his shirt, whipped, and tied to a large tree in front of the house. It was a stormy night in winter. The wind blew bitterly cold, and the boughs of the old tree crackled under falling sleet. A member of the family, fearing he would freeze to death, begged that he might be taken down; but the master would not relent. He remained there three hours; and, when he was cut down, he was more dead than alive .” - Chapter IX Sketches Of Neighboring Slaveholders (74) </li></ul><ul><li>“ Another neighbor was a Mrs. Wade. At no hour of the day was there cessation of the lash on her premises. Her labors began with the dawn, and did not cease till long after nightfall. The barn was her particular place of torture. There she lashed the slaves with the might of a man. An old slave of hers once said to me, &quot;It is hell in missis's house. 'Pears I can never get out. Day and night I prays to die.&quot; Chapter IX Sketches Of Neighboring Slaveholders (75) </li></ul><ul><li>Slaveholders were uncontrollable and brutalized their slaves with all the force and power they possessed. The slaveholders behaviors were inhumane and some thought, resembled acts of the devil. Linda and her family were victimized in the slavery cycle and were forced to follow ludicrous laws and cruel punishments. Dr. Flint portrays this persona through his obsessive and vindictive character. </li></ul>
  8. 8. Plantation Lifestyle <ul><li>“ But even those large, venomous snakes were less dreadful to my imagination than the white men in that community called civilized.” – Chapter XX New Perils (172) </li></ul><ul><li>“ The next day my new mistress began her housekeeping. I was not exactly appointed maid of all work; but I was to do whatever I was told. Monday evening came. It was always a busy time. On that night the slaves received their weekly allowance of food. Three pounds of meat, a peck of corn, and perhaps a dozen herring were allowed to each man. Women received a pound and a half of meat, a peck of corn, and the same number of herring. Children over twelve years old had half the allowance of the women. The meat was cut and weighed by the foreman of the field hands, and piled on planks before the meat house. Then the second foreman went behind the building, and when the first foreman called out, &quot;Who takes this piece of meat?&quot; he answered by calling somebody's name. This method was resorted to as a means of preventing partiality in distributing the meat. The young mistress came out to see how things were done on her plantation, and she soon gave a specimen of her character. Among those in waiting for their allowance was a very old slave, who had faithfully served the Flint family through three generations. When he hobbled up to get his bit of meat, the mistress said he was too old to have any allowance; that when niggers were too old to work, they ought to be fed on grass. Poor old man! He suffered much before he found rest in the grave.” – Chapter XVI Scenes At The Plantation (142) </li></ul><ul><li>Linda refused to have her children “broke in” through the plantation lifestyle and was determined to save them from the torture and suffering that was to be bestowed upon them. </li></ul>
  9. 9. Sacrifice <ul><li>Linda was forced to be a prisoner among her family by hiding in her grandmothers home; seen by only few who could be trusted and risk the consequence of helping a runaway. Her strength was the voices of her two children and her fear was to leave them for the free states. She must sacrifice so much for the welfare of her children, and the life she always dreamed for, without the guilt of selfishness. </li></ul><ul><li>“ The storeroom opened upon a piazza. To this hole I was conveyed as soon as I entered the house. The air was stifling; the darkness total. A bed had been spread on the floor. I could sleep quite comfortably on one side; but the slope was so sudden that I could not turn on the other without hitting the roof. The rats and mice ran over my bed; but I was weary, and I slept such sleep as the wretched may, when a tempest has passed over them. Morning came. I knew it only by the noises I heard; for in my small den day and night were all the same. I suffered for air even more than for light. But I was not comfortless. I heard the voices of my children.” – Chapter XXI The Loophole Of Retreat (174) </li></ul><ul><li>“ I suffered much more during the second winter than I did during the first. My limbs were benumbed by inaction, and the cold filled them with cramp. I had a very painful sensation of coldness in my head; even my face and tongue stiffened, and I lost the power of speech. Of course it was impossible, under the circumstances, to summon any physician.” -Chapter XXI The Loophole Of Retreat (174) </li></ul><ul><li>“ So far as my ways have been crooked, I charge them all upon slavery. It was that system of violence and wrong which now left me no alternative but to enact a falsehood “ – Chapter XXXII The Meeting Of Mother And Daughter (251) </li></ul>
  10. 10. Freedom <ul><li>“ For the last time I went up to my nook. Its desolate appearance no longer chilled me, for the light of hope had risen in my soul. Yet, even with the blessed prospect of freedom before me, I felt very sad at leaving forever that old homestead, where I had been sheltered so long by the dear old grandmother; where I had dreamed my first young dream of love; and where, after that had faded away, my children came to twine themselves so closely round my desolate heart. “ – Chapter XXIX Preparations For Escape (235) </li></ul><ul><li>Linda was forced to travel to Philadelphia, New York, Boston, and England in the midst of remaining safe, without jeopardizing her security and the welfare of her children. Along her journey, she faced treachery and further suffering from those she intended to trust. Her freedom brought many sacrifices and eventually brought her children to her side for an overdue reunion. Unfortunately, the reunion was made short when she decided to advance their education and character, by sending them away to be exposed to various advantages, that which she could never supply. At times, Linda did meet several white and black folks that she could confide in, however, she was forced to remove herself from the relationship, due to her haunting past. Eventually, both her and her children were given their freedom through a monetary exchange from a close friend, however, Linda believes her state of living, simply just ‘improved;’ For her suffering and painful memories will always exist. </li></ul><ul><li>&quot;Dear Daughter: I cannot hope to see you again on earth; but I pray to God to unite us above, where pain will no more rack this feeble body of mine; where sorrow and parting from my children will be no more. God has promised these things if we are faithful unto the end. My age and feeble health deprive me of going to church now; but God is with me here at home. Thank your brother for his kindness. Give much love to him, and tell him to remember the Creator in the days of his youth, and strive to meet me in the Father's kingdom. Love to Ellen and Benjamin. Don’t neglect him. Tell him for me, to be a good boy. Strive, my child; to train them for God’s children. May be protect and provide for you, is the prayer of your loving old mother.” – Chapter XLI Free At Last (294) </li></ul><ul><li>“ Reader, my story ends with freedom; not in the usual way, with marriage. I and my children are now free! We are as free from the power of slaveholders as are the white people of the north; and though that, according to my ideas, is not saying a great deal, it is a vast improvement in my condition. The dream of my life is not yet realized. I do not sit with my children in a home of my own. I still long for a hearthstone of my own, however humble. I wish it for my children’s sake, far more than my own.” – Chapter XLI Free At Last (303) </li></ul>“ I longed for some one to confide in; but I had been so deceived by white people, that I had lost all confidence in them. If they spoke kind words to me, I thought it was for some selfish purpose. I had entered this family with the distrustful feelings I had brought with me out of slavery; but ere six months had passed, I found that the gentle deportment of Mrs. Bruce and the smiles of her lovely babe were thawing my chilled heart.” – Chapter XXXIII A Home Found (255)
  1. A particular slide catching your eye?

    Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

×