The Importance of Keeping ART in Education

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The Importance of Keeping ART in Education

  1. 1. Table of Contents Title Slide Table of Contents What Education Can Learn From the Arts(1) What Education Can Learn From the Arts(2) My Thoughts on What Education Can Learn From the Arts New Visions: Art For Early Childhood(1) New Visions: Art For Early Childhood(2) My Thoughts on New Visions: Art for Early Childhood They Want to Learn How to Think: Using Art to Enhance Comprehension(1) They Want to Learn How to Think: Using Art to Enhance Comprehension(2) My Thoughts on They Want to Learn How to Think: Using Art to Enhance Comprehension Conclusion References
  2. 2. What Education Can Learn From the Arts “Even though the arts are considered a core subject in recent legislation pertaining to No Child Left Behind, in the reality of the school day, they are often hard to find.” - Elliot Eisner, author of “What Education Can Learn From the Arts” Thesis of the Article: The improvement of education is made possible not only by understandings promoted through scientific methods, but also those promoted through methods that are deeply rooted in the arts. - Offers eight specific things that education can learn from the arts - Along with the eight things, the article supplies reasons why it is important to know them - Points out the importance of making a “work of art” no matter what field you are working in
  3. 3. What Education Can Learn From the Arts Cont’d 1. Education can learn from the arts that form and content cannot be separated. How something is said or done shapes the content of experience. 2. Education can learn from the arts that everything interacts; there is no content without form, and no form without content. 3. Education can learn from the arts that nuance matters. To the extent to which teaching is an art, attention to nuance is critical. 4. Education can learn from the arts that surprise is not to be seen as an intruder in the process of inquiry but as a part of the rewards one reaps when working artistically. 5. Education can learn from the arts that slowing down perception is the most promising way to see what is actually there. 6. Education can learn from the arts that the limits of language are not the limits of cognition. We know more than we can tell. 7. Education can learn from the arts that somatic experience is one of the most important indicators that someone has gotten it right. 8. Education can learn from the arts that open-ended tasks permit the exercise of imagination, and the exercise of imagination is one of the most important of human aptitudes. It is imagination, not necessity, that is the mother of invention.
  4. 4. My Thoughts on “What Education Can Learn From the Arts” “What Education Can Learn From the Arts touches on many things I have found myself worrying about for years. When I was in middle school, I had art all year every year; now-a-days students have art for one semester one year. I truly believe all my knowledge of art has helped me in everything I have ever done. I have an unorthodox way of thinking that I would not have had if it weren’t for all of my art training. I loved that this article didn’t just say that art is important, but gave reasons as to WHY are is important. Since this article was written fairly recently, perhaps it will actually make a difference. It offers really wonderful advice for the modern school to follow.
  5. 5. "Our mission is to promote the arts as essential to early learning and to advocate for programs where art experiences are integral to the education of young children.“ - Mission Statement of Early Childhood Art Educators Issues Group (ECAE) - The ECAC is a group that the authors of this article belong to - This article “New Visions: Art for Early Childhood” addresses another article titled “Spirit in the Studio” - The article “Spirit in the Studio” discusses different ways to bring the “spirit” of the studio into the classroom, thus improving the way we educate our young people
  6. 6. New Visions: Art for Early Childhood Cont’d - This article brings up the concept of broadening the role of the art teacher in the school - The article goes on to suggest that the arts be truly “embedded” in the school, not just something students work on forty-five minutes one day a week - One of the principles of the ECAC is very important in the article: "A child needs plenty of unhurried time, both structured and unstructured to explore the sensory/kinesthetic properties of materials and to develop skills and concepts in re-presenting his or her experiences" - This principle suggests that students require the ability to do things on their own time, in both structured and unstructured settings
  7. 7. I absolutely loved this article! It was wonderful for me to read that someone else values using the studio experience in the classroom. I have had so many epiphanies while painting a picture of writing a song—I really hope new students can have the same opportunities that I had to do those things. I know it may not be popular to use the arts this heavily in a school, but I truly believe if it were tested more, the results would speak for themselves— students would be greatly improved in all kinds of areas.
  8. 8. They Want to Learn How to Think: Using Art to Enhance Comprehension “We die from lack of meaning” - David Hickey - This article begins with the quote above, and then offers the question: without art, does life really have meaning? - The article addresses the ways that art can be used to help students comprehend different things, for example: reading - Young students have a strong desire to learn about everything around them, says the article - The article was written by a team of teachers, one teaches 3rd grade, one teaches art, and one is a professor of literacy education - The spent several hours each week devoted solely to “comprehension instruction,” or teaching how to comprehend.
  9. 9. They Want to Learn How to Think: Using Art to Enhance Comprehension - The students taught about comprehension were of lower socio-economic status - Despite that, the results proved that these students “perform well beyond conventional academic expectations in response to meaningful comprehension instruction. They do not lack intelligence or originality.” - They began to teach the students about different concepts using visually appealing tools, such as pictures of models - Soon after, the students began to show vast improvements in understanding
  10. 10. “We hope to see art and its attending benefits for reasoning play an essential role in the elementary literacy curriculum of the future,” said the authors of the article, and I couldn’t agree more. It was wonderful for me to find an article that had a great example of how to use are in different areas to increase understanding. This article seemed to tie my other two article together and show that, perhaps, there is hope for keeping art in the schools—if not in a typical way, at least in a new and contemporary way.
  11. 11. Conclusion Art is too important to be neglected from the modern day classroom. The educational value of art has yet to be fully discovered, but what we do know is this: Art makes a huge difference in the way a child learns. Removing it from the classroom would be a tremendous mistake. We should, instead, think of new and creative ways to integrate it throughout the whole school. I would not have made it through all my years of schooling if it hadn’t been for art. I hope everyone gets the same opportunities for a creative outlet that I did.
  12. 12. References Barton, Jim, Donna Sawyer, and Cindy Swanson. 2007. "They Want to Learn How to Think: Using Art to Enhance Comprehension." Language Arts 85, no. 2: 125-133. Teacher Reference Center, EBSCOhost (accessed June 19, 2009). Eisner, E. (2009, March). What Education Can Learn from the Arts. Art Education, 62(2), 6-7. Retrieved June 12, 2009, from Teacher Reference Center database. Tarr, P. (2008, July). New Visions: Art for Early Childhood. Art Education, 61(4), 19-24. Retrieved June 18, 2009, from Teacher Reference Center database.

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