Montreal Melon(1)
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Montreal Melon(1)

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    Montreal Melon(1) Montreal Melon(1) Presentation Transcript

    • Montreal Melon Marc Chartrand, woohoo week 16
    • Montreal, Quebec, Canada
      • Large melon, 10-15lbs, that is prized for its unique sweet & spicy flavor with tones of nutmeg
      • a.k.a the “Queen of Melons”
      • Very popular between 1900-1930
      • The price of the melon cost more than steak
      • http://www.montrealmelon.com/
    • Why in the ark of taste?
      • Roots of the melon are traced from the late 17 th C.;early French settlers that moved to Montreal
      • Fits the slow food movement; very labor intensive, the generous size made it difficult to grow and transport
      • Rind is very thin and therefore bruises quite easily
      • Horse manure was a great fertilizer for the melon; the automotive boom made the manure less accessible
      • All these factors prevented the Montreal melon from being part of the “agribusiness”; food that is easy and quick to produce without much labor
      • We need to save our melons
    • What are they doing to save our melons?
      • Eco-Initiative (based out of Montreal) rekindled the desire to have the melon back in production
      • 1995- Barry Lazar (filmmaker and journalist) found old seeds at the University of Ames, Iowa, USA
      • With the help of organic and local farmers the melon is now resurrected (ie. Ken Taylor-Windmill Farm Organics in Montreal)
      • Best adapted to the rich soil of the Montreal slopes, in the suburbs of Montreal city
      • The melon is still not in commercial production and is still at risk
      • Forecast 12-15 years before the melon will reach minimal significance and can be shared provincially
      • The melons can and will be saved