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examines the importance of skill development and educational attainment.

examines the importance of skill development and educational attainment.

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  • “ Schools don’t believe they are in the workforce readiness business.” C. Michael Ferraro, President - Training Solutions
  • We also know that the US Workforce is aging – these numbers show that there will be significant turnover in the workforce resulting in a loss of skilled workers – The increase in the youngest cohort is interesting The growth in the younger cohort will not offset the retirement of those in the age groups 55+ which continues to grow larger every year. Over next 10 years, more BB will retire. Oklahoma’s median age (US Census 2006-08 American Community Survey) was 36.1 years of age.
  • Inadequate literacy and numeracy skills among large segments of our student and adult populations. An ongoing shift in the demographic profile of our population, powered by the highest immigration rates in nearly a century. The continuing evolution of the economy and the nation’s job structure, requiring higher levels of skills from an increasing proportion of workers. Changes in our Economy: 1. Labor Market has changed. 2. Employment growth. 3. Correlation between earnings and educational attainment These changes are caused by Inadequate literacy and numeracy skills among large segments of our student and adult populations. Demographic shifts: An ongoing shift in the demographic profile of our population, powered by the highest immigration rates in nearly a century. U.S. labor force growing slower—none of the growth is predicted from native-born workers 25-54 years of age. Immigrants will account for more than 50% of the growth.Hispanic population will increase by 20% by 2030. 57% 16-64 year olds are foreign-born 50%+ lack a high school diploma 80% report they do not speak English well or none at all. The continuing evolution of the economy and the nation’s job structure, requiring higher levels of skills from an increasing proportion of workers. Over the next 25 years or so, as better-educated individuals leave the workforce they will be replaced by those who, on average, have lower levels of education and skill. Over the same period, 50% of projected job growth will be concentrated in occupations associated with higher education and skill levels. Millions of students and adults will be less able to qualify for higher-paying jobs.
  • #1: Core problem: fact that the educational system hasn’t evolved. While the world changed, education system and curriculum didn’t; students are taught the same information they were taught decades ago. #2: None of 2008 U.S. presidential candidates are focusing on the issue of educational change. Ken Kay stated at the Sysmposium on the Workforce Readiness of the Future U.S. Labor Pool that 99% of the public believes that getting K-12 right is related to U.S. Competititiveness. #4: Bill Brock, former senator and Secretary of Labor, stated that the teaching profession is not attracting the best and the brightest and the “quality of the education system can’t be greater than the quality of teachers”.
  • In 40 years we have moved from #1 in the world to 18 th out of 24 industrialized nations. In 11 years (1995) we have dropped ranking from 1 st to 14 th . Today, the United States ranks 18 th out of 24 industrialized nations in high school graduation rate. United States college graduation rank is 14 th in the world. 2 nd highest country with percentage of 55—64 year old citizens with college degrees. 25 – 34 years of age U. S. trails 10 other countries in terms of college degree completion. Source: America’s Promise Alliance www.americaspromise.org
  • About 66% of prison inmates are high school dropouts and 33% of all juvenile offenders read below the 4 th grade level.
  • A one-year increase in average years of schooling for dropouts would reduce murder and assault by almost 30%; motor vehicle theft by 20%; arson by 13% and burglary and larceny by about 6%.
  • By 4 th grade, African-Americans & Latinos are nearly 3 grades behind their white peers. The Nation’s Report Card reports that fewer than 33% of 8 th graders read at a proficient level. Source: Alliance for Excellent Education Fact Sheet, Feb. 2009
  • The average U. S. Student spends about 900 hours in the classroom and 1,500 hours in front of the TV each year. Source: Center for Screen Time Awareness. 50% of incoming 9 th graders in urban, high-poverty schools read 3 years or more below grade level. 33% of high school graduates are not ready to succeed in an introductory-level college writing course. 4-Year colleges, nearly 8% of all entering students are required to take at least one remedial reading course. Only about 33% of them are likely to graduate within eight years. Source: Alliance for Excellent Education Fact Sheet, Feb. 2009
  • The next several slides I believe with provide reasons that everyone must be actively involved in Workforce Readiness.
  • Impose heavy & tragic consequences: Lower Earnings Poorer Health Higher Rates of Incarceration
  • Poverty rate is more than twice that of families headed by high school graduates. Each drop out costs U.S. $192 billion in lost income and taxes. Adding just one year of schooling for these would recoup nearly half those losses. Taxpayers foot an additional $978 million. Poor preparation cost $2.3 billion annually in lost productivity.
  • Poverty rate is more than twice that of families headed by high school graduates. Each drop out costs U.S. $192 billion in lost income and taxes. Adding just one year of schooling for these would recoup nearly half those losses. Taxpayers foot an additional $978 million. Poor preparation cost $2.3 billion annually in lost productivity.
  • Poverty rate is more than twice that of families headed by high school graduates. Each drop out costs U.S. $192 billion in lost income and taxes. Adding just one year of schooling for these would recoup nearly half those losses. Taxpayers foot an additional $978 million. Poor preparation cost $2.3 billion annually in lost productivity.
  • In addition, the average low-skill household was a free rider with respect to government public goods, receiving public goods costing some $6,095 per house­hold for which it paid nothing. Dropout Households Receive More than $3.00 in benefits for every $1.00 paid in taxes. Lost Revenue in taxes for Government Spending: Households headed by dropouts: $9,689 Taxes paid per household Households headed by persons with high school diploma or higher: $34,629 Taxes paid per household Total Annual Net Cost of High School Dropout Households to the Taxpayer: $397 Billion—exclude spending on public goods, interest payments of government debt and related costs. $483 Billion—excluding spending on public goods. Net Lifetime Costs Receiving, on average, at least $22,449 more in benefits than they pay in taxes each year, low-skill households impose substantial long-term costs on the U.S. taxpayer. Assuming an average 50-year adult life span for heads of household, the average life­time costs to the taxpayer will be $1.1 million for each low-skill household, net of any taxes paid. If the costs of interest and other financial obligations are added, the average lifetime cost rises to $1.3 million per household.
  • If we do not act now, what is at stake is our future With today’s technology, many businesses can locate anywhere. Why Oklahoma?
  • Americans are dropping out of high school between the freshman and sophomore years at 3 times the rate of 30 years ago. College Board “Coming to Our Senses: Education and the American Future” Our graduation rate is down to 67% today as compared to 77% in the early 70’s.
  • Americans are dropping out of high school between the freshman and sophomore years at 3 times the rate of 30 years ago. College Board “Coming to Our Senses: Education and the American Future” Our graduation rate is down to 67% today as compared to 77% in the early 70’s.
  • 17 degrees are awarded per 100 students from colleges in Oklahoma.
  • Only 18% of Oklahoma’s students meet all 4 ACT College Readiness Benchmark Scores. Nationally: 45% graduates tested: Avg Composite score: 21.1 English Score: 20.6 Math: 21 Reading: 21.4 Science: 20.9
  • The U.S. Census-defined metropolitan statistical areas (MSA) that includes Oklahoma City also includes 7 counties in Oklahoma. 71 high schools within this region Average Graduation rate = 69.5% 11 of these high schools fewer than 60% 9 th graders progress to 12 th grade on time. Source: www.edequality.com
  • This is increase annually.
  • Counties included: Tulsa, Osage, Pawnee, Rogers, Creek, Okmulgee, Wagoner
  • Counties included: Logan, Lincoln, Oklahoma, Canadian, Grady, McClain & Cleveland.
  • Be involved and encourage your employees to be involved.
  • Ten years ago, Western Village was facing the possibility of closure.  Enrollment had declined and the test scores were in the teens and twenties!  INTEGRIS Health stepped up to the plate in 1998 and started an after school and summer program.  Soon thereafter, a new staff was hired and the success story continued. In the Fall of 2000, Western Village opened as one of the State’s first elementary public charter schools, Western Village Academy, Inc., the only charter school to serve the children in its attendance area rather than selecting students from a pool of applicants.  Enrollment has increased from 150 to 320 with an annual waiting list. Today, the facilities have been completely renovated, state-of-the art library/media and technology centers have been built, a walking track has been installed, and a master staff of teachers is on board.  The test scores are now in the 70’s and 80’s, and the annual API targets have been reached for three years in a row. Western Village features an arts-integrated curriculum with full time specialists in visual art, music, dance/p.e. and literary arts.  A full time physician’s assistant and counselor are on staff to serve students’ and their families’ needs.  Every child in grades 1-5 has a mentor who comes to visit them once a week for one hour. Students in Grades Pre-K through fifth grade are served by a teacher and paraprofessional.  Each of the morning and afternoon Pre-K classes are limited to 15 students each.  Grades K-5th grade have no more than 22 students in each class, and total school enrollment is held at 320. SUCCESS FOR ALL , a scientifically research-based reading program has proven to be effective and successful.  Starting with 25% of all 1st through 5th grade students reading on-or-above grade level and progressing to almost 70% reading on-or-above grade level has been one of our many achievements. Parent and community involvement has been key to the success of Western Village.  Not only has INTEGRIS’ support been solid and ongoing, but Oklahoma Christian University, a local fire station, and several nearby churches have adopted Western Village and its teachers and children.  Many donations have been made to help the school. 
  • The benefits far outweigh the time involved. Postsecondary Education OPPORTUNITY reported that Volunteering for Organizations in 2002 is higher percentage as the person’s education attainment increases. Some HS=12%; HS Grad=21.3%; Some College=32.2%; Associate=34.3%; Bachelors=41.5%; Masters=48.4%; Professional=46.7%; & Doctorate=44.1%.
  • US Census Bureau reported in 2002 the average household income by educational attainment of the householder is higher with educational attainment. Less Than 9 th grade=$26,529; HS Dropout=$32,329; HS Grad=$45,575; Associate=$$59,929; Bachelor=$83,449; Master=$94,492; Doctorate=$121,211; & Professional=$137,654. Unemployment Rate Percentages decrease with higher educational attainment. BLS reported between 2000 & 2004 All Races, Both Sexes who had 3 Yrs or less of HS=6.5% & 2004 was 9.7%; HS Dropout=5.3% & 7.5% in 2004; HS Grad=3.5% & 5.1% in 2004; Some College=2.9% & 4.6% in 2004; Associate=2.3% & 3.7% in 2004; Bachelor=1.8% & 3% in 2004; Masters=1.6% & 2.5% in 2004; Professional .8% & 1.5% in 2004; & Doctorate=.9% & 1.8% in 2004. It reduces the number of people unemployed within a community! Homeownership is more affordable with higher educational attainment (US Census Bureau, American Housing Survey for the U.S. 2005 reported that Those owning home for Less than 9 th grade=56.5%; HS Dropout=57.5%; HS Grad, GED=68.5%; Some College=65.8%; Associate=72.7%; Bachelor=74.5%; & Masters+=80.7%.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Workforce Readiness Why It Is Oklahoma’s Path for Economic Growth
    • 2. Workforce Readiness: What We Know
      • Global competitive landscape has changed.
      • Workforce development leads to economic development.
      • There is an acute shortage of skilled labor that’s worsening.
      • K-20 education system is not producing the workers that employers need.
      • Those in the workforce will need ongoing training to keep their skills updated.
      SHRM 2007 Symposium on the Workforce Readiness of the Future U.S. Labor Pool
    • 3. Characteristics of Workforce Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics Median Age of U.S. worker in 2000 was 39. In 2010, it is 41. First time in 25 years that youngest workforce grew more than overall. 35-44 year old cohort decreased by 10%.
    • 4. Importance of Skilled Workforce: 3 Forces Changing our Nation’s Future “ America’s Perfect Storm: Three Forces Changing our Nation’s Future” 2007 Irwin Kirsch, ETS Divergent Skill Distribution Demographic Shifts Changing Economy Different Labor Market— Employment Growth— Correlation Between Earnings and Educational Attainment Ongoing shift in demographic profile of our population— Highest immigration rates in nearly a century— Labor force growing slower Uneven distribution of skills across population and ethnic groups
    • 5. Employers Belief
      • About 40% of high school graduates lack the literacy skills employers seek.
      • More than 50% of recent high school graduates are weak in such skills as oral/written communications, problem-solving, and critical thinking.
      Source: Alliance for Excellent Education Fact Sheet, Feb. 2009
    • 6. Key Points: Workforce Readiness
      • Issue: R equires systemic change. Teachers also part of the problem.
      • Issue: Not priority for policymakers.
      • Issue: Pushing changes in policy hasn’t been a business priority. The business community needs to articulate what is needed for the educational system to produce. Employers need strategies to deal with the talent shortage in the short term.
      • Issue: Workers need both basic and applied skills. Credentials are replacing capabilities.
      • Issue: It requires collaboration between the public and private sector on both a national and local level.
      • Issue: Workforce uncertainty requires flexibility.
      • Issue: Leadership is lacking.
      SHRM 2007 Symposium on the Workforce Readiness of the Future U.S. Labor Pool
    • 7. Achievement Gap Fact: World College Graduates Source: Education Equality Project www.edequality.com/fast_facts
    • 8. Achievement Gap Fact: International Ranking (2006) Top 30 Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) nations, the United States ranks: 25 th in mathematics 21 st in science Source: Education Equality www.edequality.com/fast_facts
    • 9. Achievement Gap Fact: International Ranking Nearly 60% of Engineering PhD awarded annually in the U. S. are earned by foreign nationals. Indians have founded more engineering and technology companies in the United States during the past decade than immigrants from Britain, China, Taiwan and Japan combined. Source: Where the Engineers Are, Vivek Wadhwa, 2007 www.2mminutes.com/films/reference.asp
    • 10. Achievement Gap Fact: Science Nearly 40% of U. S. High School students do not take any science class more challenging than General Biology. Source: Math & Science Education in a Global Age: What the U.S. Can Learn from China, Asia Society, 2006
    • 11. Achievement Gap Fact: Science 5 th and 9 th grade students are taught Physical Science by a teacher lacking a major or certification in the area. Source: National Academy of Sciences, Rising Above the Gathering Storm, 2005 www.2mminutes.com/films/reference.asp 90%
    • 12. Achievement Gap Fact: Math “ What percentage of 8 th grade Mathematic teachers earned a degree in Mathematics?” 48% Source: National Commission on Mathematics & Science Teaching for the 21 st Century, Before It’s Too Late 9/2000 www.2mminutes.com/films/reference.asp
    • 13. Achievement Gap Fact: Mathematics Nearly 55% of U. S. High School students do not take any Math courses beyond 2 years of Algebra and 1 year of Geometry. Source: National Center for Education Statistics 2004 – Quoted in Math & Science Education in a Global Age: What the U.S. Can Learn from China, Asia Society, 2006 www.2mminutes.com/films/references.asp
    • 14. Achievement Gap Fact: Mathematics Nearly 70% of high school parents in America think their children’s schools teach the right amount of math and science. 79% of high school principals aren’t worried about low academic standards. Source: www.publicagenda.org Reality Check 2006, A Report from Education Insights at Public Agenda
    • 15. Achievement Gap Fact: Mathematics (2003 Ranking) United States 15-year-olds: 24 th out of 29 developed countries in Mathematics Source: Organization for Economic Cooperation & Development (OECD), Pisa 2003 Results www.oecd.org www.2mminutes.org/images/the-facts-3
    • 16. Achievement Gap Fact: Math Proficiency By 12 th Grade Source: Competitiveness Index, “Where America Stands” 11/14/06 34% Asian-Americans 20% Whites 10% Native Americans 4% Hispanics 3% African-Americans
    • 17. Achievement Gap Fact: Incarceration High School Dropout is 5—8 times more likely to become incarcerated than a college graduate. Source: Education Equality Project www.edequality.com/fast_facts U. S. Department of Education Increase high school completion rate for all 20—60 year old would reduce costs in the criminal justice system annually by as much as 1% $1.4 Billion
    • 18. Achievement Gap Fact: Cost per Student to Prison Inmate 9, 644 22, 600 Source: Education Equality Project www.edequality.com/fast_facts STUDENTS PRISONERS
    • 19. Know the Facts Every 26 seconds, a student drops out of high school in America. 33% high school students will drop out before graduation. 1.1 million students each year 7,000 students drop out each day. Source: Education Equality Project www.edequality.com/fast_facts
    • 20. Top 10 Fast Fact: By 4 th Grade Source: Education Equality Project www.edequality.com/fast_facts
    • 21. Top 10 Fact: Low-Income Achievement Levels On average students eligible for free or reduced lunch are approximately two years of learning behind the average ineligible student. Source: Education Equality Project www.edequality.com/fast_facts
    • 22. America’s High School Students
      • Only about 33% of students entering the 9 th grade each fall graduate 4 years later prepared for college or the contemporary workplace.
      • Another 33% will leave high school with a diploma but without the skills and knowledge needed to succeed in college or the contemporary workplace.
      • Another 33% will not graduate from high school within four years, if at all.
      • In this country, there are about 2,000 high schools that produce the majority of dropouts.
      Source: Alliance for Excellent Education: “The Graduation Promise Act One: Page Summary”
    • 23. Top 10 Fast Fact: (2004) Students Requiring College Remediation Source: Education Equality Project www.edequality.com/fast_facts
    • 24. Why Be Involved “ Overcoming this lack of skilled workers will increasingly become the responsibility of companies themselves.” Helen Hankin, The New Workforce “ If we don’t get the people thing right, we lose; it is the most important thing in all our businesses.” Jack Welsh, Former CEO General Electric “ Student performance is not just an education issue. It’s an economic issue, a civic issue, a social issue, and a national security issue.” U. S. Department of Education
    • 25. Costs of Education Gap
      • Wars in Iraq & Afghanistan
      • +
      • Stimulus Package
      • ($1.3 to $2.3 Trillion Annually)
      Source: Kevin Huffman, The Washington Post January 4, 2010
    • 26. Economic Impact
      • These educational gaps impose on the United States’ economy is equivalent
      • Permanent National Recession
      McKinsey & Company: “The Economic Impact of the Achievement Gap in America’s Schools” (April 2009)
    • 27. Why is education important? The Engine for Jobs
        • Positive relationship between an investment in education and a strong economy.
        • An educated citizenry leads to increased productivity, economic growth and good jobs.
    • 28. Achievement Gap Fact: 70% Top Income Earners Source: Education Equality Project www.edequality.com/fast_facts
    • 29. Achievement Gap Fact: Top College Talent Pool Source: Education Equality Project www.edequality.com/fast_facts
    • 30. Top 10 Fast Fact: U. S. Lost Wages Class of 2008 high school dropouts will cost the United States almost $319 billion in lost wages over their lifetimes. Source: Education Equality Project www.edequality.com/fast_facts
    • 31. Achievement Fast Fact: Parental involvement is associated with higher student achievement outcomes. Source: Education Equality Project www.edequality.com/fast_facts 77 Studies 300,000 Students
    • 32. “ As we enter our second century of statehood, the test will be whether we rise to the moment and transform our state into a global winner based on workforce skills and talent, or passively let our competitive edge slip away.” Governor Brad Henry
    • 33. What’s at Stake?
      • For Business
        • Expansion
        • Quality workforce
      • For Oklahomans
        • Higher wages
        • Quality Jobs
        • Better standard of living
      • For Communities
        • Population growth
        • Economic vitality
        • Oklahoma’s reputation
      Source: http://www.okcommerce.gov/workforce
    • 34. A Generation Slipping Away
      • Every day in Oklahoma, 30 students leave their place in common education.
      • In the last 5 minutes, about 14 more students in Oklahoma have left high school without diplomas.
      • Oklahoma’s dropout rate 33%
    • 35. 2006-08 American Community Survey Population: 3.6 Million 18 – 24 year olds 19.1% Less than High School 35.2% High School/GED attainment 25 years and over 15.1% Less than High School 84.9% High School or above 22.4% Bachelor’s or above
    • 36. The Impact to Our State
      • How does the current high school drop out rate impact our state?
    • 37. A Look at Oklahoma
      • 70% High School Graduation Rate (2005)
      • 67% College Readiness Rate (ACT Report, 2009)
      • 58.4% College Enrollment Rate directly from H.S. (2007)
      • 44% College graduation rate within 6 years (2008)
      • OK High School Dropouts for Class of 2008:
      • 14,653
      Source: www.edequality.com www.highereducation.org “Measuring Up 2008 The State Report Card on Higher Education” www.okhighered.org
    • 38. A Look at Oklahoma
      • ACT Score 2009 Average
      • Average Composite Score = 20.7
      • English = 20.5 [ 18 ]
      • Math = 19.9 [ 22 ]
      • Reading = 21.4 [ 21 ]
      • Science = 20.5 [ 24 ]
      • 50% chance of obtaining B or higher.
      • 75% chance of obtaining C or higher.
      Source: ACT Profile Report: Oklahoma (2009) www.act.org/news/data/09/pdf/states/oklahoma.pdf 71%
    • 39. Economic Impact: Tulsa & Oklahoma City
      • Class of 2008:
        • 4,153 Tulsa students dropped out from the class.
        • 4,777 Oklahoma City students dropped out from the class.
      Combined Additional Earnings Tulsa: $18 Million Annually Oklahoma City: $24 Million Annually Source: www.edequality.com
    • 40. Economic Impact: Tulsa & Oklahoma City Increased Human Capital 54% Tulsa 55% OKC Students would likely continue their education, some earning as high as PhD or other Professional degree. Source: www.edequality.com
    • 41. Economic Impact: Tulsa & Oklahoma City
        • Additional Tax Revenue
        • As these graduates’ incomes grow, local, state, property, income & sales tax revenues will also increase.
        • Each City would have increased revenue by
        • $3 Million Annually
        • increased spending and higher salaries
      Source: www.edequality.com
    • 42. Economic Impact: Tulsa & Oklahoma City
        • Increased Home Sales
        • (Mid-point of career)
        • $26 Million (Tulsa)
        • $32 Million (OKC)
      Source: www.edequality.com
    • 43. Economic Impact: Tulsa & Oklahoma City
        • Each City i ncreased Auto Sales by
        • $2 Million
        • Annual increase in auto sales
      Source: www.edequality.com
    • 44. Economic Impact: Tulsa & Oklahoma City
        • Additional Jobs Supported (by Mid-Career)
        • Tulsa: 150 New Jobs
        • Oklahoma City: 200 New Jobs
      Source: www.edequality.com
    • 45. Economic Impact: Tulsa* & Oklahoma City**
        • Increase in Gross Regional Products
        • (by Mid-Career)
      Source: www.edequality.com $23 Million* $29 Million**
    • 46. Economic Impact: Tulsa* & Oklahoma City
        • Additional Spending
        • $13 Million*
        • $17 Million
        • Additional Investment
        • $4 Million*
        • $5 Million
      Source: www.edequality.com
    • 47. Economic Impact: Tulsa
      • The MSA that includes Tulsa also includes 7 counties in Oklahoma. The 62 high schools located within this region have an average graduation rate of 66.9%. Nine of these are considered to be with schools fewer than 60% of freshman progress to their senior year on time.
      http://www.all4ed.org/publication_material/EconMSA
    • 48. Economic Impact: Oklahoma City
      • The MSA that includes Oklahoma City also includes 7 counties in Oklahoma. The 71 high schools located within this region have an average graduation rate of 66.9%. Eleven of these are considered to be with schools fewer than 60% of freshman progress to their senior year on time.
      http://www.all4ed.org/publication_material/EconMSA
    • 49. Ways You Can Become Involved
      • Look for programs that are already in place.
      • Start small, pilot programs.
      • Speak in local middle/high school classes.
      • Provide tours at your business.
      • Implement ideas that directly relate to your business goals.
      • Be willing to be the glue.
    • 50. Public/Private Partnership Examples
      • Educator externships
      • Career Awareness
      • Career Day or Career Fairs
      • Job Shadowing
      • Take Our Daughters & Sons to Work Day®
      • Mentor Relationships
      • School-based enterprise
      • Work Experience
        • DHS; DRS; WIA
      • Curriculum Development
      • Education/Business Exchange
    • 51. Employee Support Examples
      • Allow employees volunteer time—tutoring/mentoring.
      • Support/educate employee involvement in schools.
      • Solicit parents of children.
      • Solicit businesses of parents.
      • Match contributions for educational programs and scholarships.
        • Direct payment to educational institution
        • Cash bonus for GED attainment
        • Cash bonus for college completion
    • 52. Private/Public Involvement
      • Integris Health
      • Oklahoma Christian University
      • Local Fire Station
      • Local Churches
      • Over 300 Mentors
      • Parental Support
      • Test Scores risen from 10 – 20s to 60 – 70s.
      • Increase enrollment from 150 to 320, with a waiting list.
      • 23% to 69% student involvement in sports.
      • Teacher retention from 76% to 98%
      • Decrease in conduct referrals from 37% to 11%
      • Oklahoma A+ school
    • 53. Results:
      • Business Benefits
      • Improved interpersonal and entry-level skills
      • Reduced training and remediation costs
      • Increased productivity
      • Reduced employee turnover
      • Effect a better match between current and future job market needs and the career awareness and workforce skills of high school graduates
      • Benefits for HR Professionals
      • More talented/skilled employees recruited.
      • Better prepared workforce.
      • Skills for future learning/development.
      • Educators more in tune with employer needs.
      • Reduced training cost : 25% - 50%
        • Lower initial training
        • Lower turnover & re-training
    • 54. Results:
      • Benefits for Education:
      • Opportunity to share education successes.
      • Shared Community and Industry involvement in Education Reform.
      • Greater access to valuable teaching resources.
      • Development of curriculum that is directly relevant to career placement and employment success.
      • Benefits for the Student:
      • Connects students to the “real” world of work.
      • Promotes independent learning and higher-level skills such as interpersonal and team communications.
      • Offers students the opportunity to find employment in industry and service fields that require higher-level skills.
    • 55. Benefits for the Community
      • Increase the quality of community life through school system improvement.
      • Higher standard of living
      • Stronger economic and tax base
      • Greater ability to attract and sustain industry and business.
      • Stronger community - education - industry relationships
      Results:
    • 56. Any Questions?
      • Glenda Owen
      • LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/GlendaOwen
      • Facebook: www.facebook.com/GlendaSOwen
      • E-mail: [email_address]
      • Mailing Address:
      • Oklahoma Employment Security Commission PO Box 52003 Oklahoma City, OK 73152-2003
      • Voice: (405) 557-5316
      • Cell: (405) 203-2727
      • Fax: (405) 557-7205