Ambient Social TV (CHI 2008)

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Slides from CHI 2008 Presentation of the paper \"Ambient Social TV: Drawing People into a Shared Experience\" by Gunnar Harboe, Crysta Metcalf, Frank Bentley, Joe Tullio, Noel Massey and Guy Romano

Slides from CHI 2008 Presentation of the paper \"Ambient Social TV: Drawing People into a Shared Experience\" by Gunnar Harboe, Crysta Metcalf, Frank Bentley, Joe Tullio, Noel Massey and Guy Romano

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  • 1. Ambient Social TV Gunnar Harboe, Crysta Metcalf, Frank Bentley, Joe Tullio, Noel Massey, Guy Romano Drawing People into a Shared Experience
  • 2. Introduction
  • 3. Summary
    • Social Television: creating a remote shared experience around watching TV
    • Ambient devices for social awareness
    • Two-week user-study in 2x5 households
    • Ambient devices helped put people in touch
    • Social TV demands interaction options for multiple levels of engagement
  • 4.
    • Remotely shared TV-watching experience
    • “Like watching TV together”
    • Presence + communication (+ sharing content)
    Social Television
  • 5.
    • Buddy list with channel/program context
    • Program recommendations
    • Text chats
    • Voice calls
    • Video chats
    • Emoticons
    • Multiplayer quiz games
    Social TV Features
  • 6. Social TV Systems
    • AmigoTV (Coppens et al. 2004)
    • Telebuddies (Luyten et al. 2006)
    • Media Center Buddies (Regan & Todd 2004)
    • PARC Social TV (Oehlberg et al. 2006)
    • Reflexion (Cullinan & Agamanolis 2006)
    • ConnecTV (Boertjes 2007)
    • CollaboraTV (Harrison & Amento 2007)
    • 2BeOn (Abreu et al. 2001)
  • 7. Motorola Labs’ Social TV Project
  • 8. Social TV 1
    • Investigated live voice sessions
      • Provided social and practical benefits
      • Some indications of potential problems
    1 2 3 4 Harboe et al. (2008) “The Uses of Social Television” in ACM Computers in Entertainment
  • 9. Social TV 2
    • Investigate naturally occurring instances of interaction, not-pre arranged sessions
    • Investigate behaviors leading up to a communication session
    • Introduce ambient displays as extension of presence
  • 10. Social TV 2
    • Test an experience without freeform communication (no voice, just presence)
    • Primarily a research probe: design priority to gather data, not provide the best possible experience
  • 11. System Description
  • 12. System Components
  • 13. System Components
  • 14. Features
    • Ambient devices
    • Presence
    • Communication
  • 15. Ambient Devices
    • Ambient Orb (Ambient Devices, Inc.)
    • Virtual Orb (Chumby) (www.chumby.com)
  • 16. Ambient Devices
    • Social Awareness (even when TV off)
      • Changing colors
      • (Pulsing)
    • Number of buddies watching Social TV:
      • None One Multiple
  • 17. Presence
  • 18. Presence
    • Buddy list
  • 19. Presence
    • Buddy list
  • 20. Presence
    • Buddy list
    Channel banner
  • 21. Presence
    • Buddy list Channel banner
  • 22. Presence
    • Buddy list Channel banner
    Pop-ups
  • 23. Presence
    • Buddy list Channel banner Pop-ups
  • 24. Communication
  • 25. Communication Suggestions
  • 26. Communication
    • Suggestions
  • 27.
    • Suggestions
    Communication Emoticons
  • 28. Communication
    • Suggestions Emoticons
  • 29. Communication
    • Suggestions Emoticons
    Canned text messages
  • 30. Communication
    • Suggestions Emoticons Canned text messages
    Metcalf et al. (2008): “Examining Presence and Lightweight Messaging in a Social Television Experience” – forthcoming
  • 31. Study Description
  • 32. Study Design
    • 2 groups of 5 households
      • 1 system/household, all 5 connected
      • 2 weeks per group
  • 33. Participants
    • Group A
      • Female (+families)
      • 26-33
      • 4 married, 1 engaged
      • 3 with (small) children
      • Friends and family members
    • Group B
      • Female (+families)
      • 46-53
      • 4 married, 1 divorced
      • All with teenagers
      • Friends and family members
  • 34. Data and Analysis
    • Interviews, voice mail diaries, system logs
    • Qualitative analysis: Affinity method
  • 35. Usage
  • 36. Measurable Use 185 N/A Canned text messages sent 120 59 Emoticons sent 160 62 Buddy’s show joined via buddy list 390 185 Buddy list views 181 154 Social TV watched (hrs) B A Activity
  • 37. Reported Use
    • “ Every time I walked back and forth, I’d see [the orb]” (B3)
    • “ Every time I passed by, a thousand times a day, I would look to see what color it was.” (B1)
  • 38. Reported Use
    • “ Every time I walked back and forth, I’d see [the orb]” (B3)
    • “ Every time I passed by, a thousand times a day, I would look to see what color it was.” (B1)
    • “ Just about every time I turned it on, if I saw someone was on, I called their house.” (B1)
  • 39. Use-Cases
    • “ The first thing I’ll do is I’ll look at the orb. […] Then I’ll turn on the TV.” (A2)
  • 40. Use-Cases
    • “ I’ll quickly turn it on and see who’s on and what they’re watching.” (A1)
  • 41. Use-Cases
    • “ Something they were watching might grab my attention more than what I thought I was going to watch.” (A3)
  • 42. Use-Cases
    • “ I’ll see what they are watching and I’ll usually send out shout-outs based on what they are watching, or the thumbs down or whatever.” (A2)
  • 43. Use-Cases
    • “ I do thumbs up [or] thumbs down, wait to see if there’s a reaction, and if there is I’ll send a message.” (B3)
  • 44. Use-Cases
    • “ I’ll say, ‘Who’s there?’ and if it comes back that it’s not one of their kids and it’s my girlfriend or something, then I’ll pick up the phone.” (B1)
  • 45. Use-Cases
    • “ I noticed the orb was blue, so I knew somebody had their television on, and sure enough, it was [B2’s household]. And I knew that her husband’s at work and her kids were at school, so I deduced it was [B2]. And so without even saying ‘Who’s there?’ I immediately went to her channel, which was Oprah , and I sent her a thumbs-up. And then she thumbs-upped me, and then two seconds later I said [to myself], ‘This is dumb!’ And then [I called her, and] we had a whole conversation.” (B1)
  • 46. Findings
  • 47. Ambient Awareness
    • Ambient orbs provided peripheral social awareness while not watching
    • “ Since I had [the Chumby] in the kitchen, it was just while I was cooking… it was like, ‘Oh, I wonder who’s on.’” (A1)
    • “ I notice when the color’s on, whether it’s purple or blue; I know that someone else is actually on the system.” (B3)
  • 48. Feeling Connected
    • This social awareness inspired a feeling of togetherness
    • “ I liked coming into the house and saying, ‘Oh, someone’s home watching TV too now.’ […] It was like a friendly feeling; like, ‘Someone else is home and I’m not the only one home tonight.’” (B1)
  • 49. Motivation to Turn On
    • Ambient orbs provided reasons to turn on the TV
    • “ The orb was purple, so I thought, ‘Wow, that’s a lot of people on!’ and so I turned it on.” (B1)
  • 50. Providing Context
    • Situating the ambient displays within a larger system enriched the ambient information
    • “ There’d be no reason to have an orb [if] I can’t turn it on and see who it’s connected to.” (B1)
    • “ As the two weeks progressed, I kinda had a feel [about who might be on].” (A1)
  • 51. Increasing Engagement Full involvement Talking on the phone Exchanging lightweight messages Co-viewing program Viewing buddy list Peripheral awareness Noticing ambient display
  • 52. Reactions
    • “ A stupid toy” (B1)
    • “ Just kinda boring” (B5b)
    • “ I wouldn’t buy it” (A4)
    • “ It’s just no use” (B4)
    • “ So unnecessary” (B3b)
    • “ [Not] something that I would use” (A3)
  • 53. Reactions
    • “ A stupid toy” (B1)
    • “ Just kinda boring” (B5b)
    • “ I wouldn’t buy it” (A4)
    • “ It’s just no use” (B4)
    • “ So unnecessary” (B3b)
    • “ [Not] something that I would use” (A3)
    • Not their close friends
    • Not enough free communication
  • 54. Reactions
    • “ A stupid toy” (B1)
    • “ Just kinda boring” (B5b)
    • “ I wouldn’t buy it” (A4)
    • “ It’s just no use” (B4)
    • “ So unnecessary” (B3b)
    • “ [Not] something that I would use” (A3)
    • “ I love the orb” (A2, B5)
    • “ We liked the orb” (B1)
    • “ The coolest part” (A3)
    • “ Cool” (A2, A4)
    • “ That was neat” (A1b)
    • “ The orb is the interesting thing” (B4)
  • 55. Conclusion
  • 56. Takeaways: Ambient
    • Television use can be a meaningful social signal, well suited to an ambient display
    • Ambient information becomes richer when it is part of a greater system
  • 57. Takeaways: Social TV
    • Social television systems benefit from an ambient mode of interaction
    • Need to support interactions at all different levels of engagement
  • 58. Current/Future Work
    • Study communicative Social TV systems
    • Further in-home testing, longer periods
    • Explore other ambient presence modes
    • Embed ambient devices in other systems
  • 59. Thanks
    • Larry Marturano
    • Elaine Huang
    • Seonyoung Park
    • Ambient Devices, Inc.
    • chumby.com
  • 60. Questions?
    • ?