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Tolkien Power Point

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  • Read the informative promo of the novel “Indians in Pakistan” written by Vivek Pereira, which can be viewed at http://www.slideshare.net/VivekPereira1/indians-in-pakistan-26749249 - This book is available on Pothi.com & Amazon.in at http://www.amazon.in/Indians-Pakistan-Vivek-Pereira/dp/9351261573/ref=pd_ybh_1
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    • 1. TOLKIEN AND THE GREAT WAR The Remnants of Tragedy
    • 2. EVADING THE WAR
    • 3. THE YEAR BEFORE THE WAR Edith Bratt J. R. R. Tolkien
    • 4. TOLKIEN’S TIME AT WAR The devastation of Delville Wood, September, 1916 Foot traffic on a sunken road outside La Boiselle, 1916 Late on Sunday, June 4, 1916, Tolkien set off for the war. He did not expect to survive. ‘Junior officers were being killed off, a dozen a minute,’ he later recalled. ‘Parting from my wife then . . . it was like a death.” - J. R. R. Tolkien, cited by J. Garth in Tolkien and the Great War
    • 5. 11TH BATTALION BATTLES The Attack on Oivillers The Attack on Schwaben Redoubt
    • 6. RETURNING HOME “One has indeed personally to come under the shadow of war to feel fully its oppression; but as the years go by it seems now often forgotten that to be caught in youth by 1914 was no less hideous an experience than to be involved in 1939 and the following years. By 1918, all but one of my close friends were dead.” - J.R.R. Tolkien, forward to The Lord of the Rings
    • 7. EFFECT ON TOLKIEN’S WRITING when considering all of Tolkien’s writings, none of his publications were affected by WWI as much as The Lord of the Rings
    • 8. A MATURING MASTERPIECE "One writes such a story not out of the leaves of trees still to be observed, nor by means of botany and soil-science; but it grows like a seed in the dark out of the leaf-mould of mind: out of all that has been seen or thought or read, that has long ago been forgotten, descending into the deeps. No doubt there is much selection, as with a gardener: what one throws on one's personal compost-heap; and my mould is evidently made largely of linguistic matter." - J. R. R. Tolkien, on the creation of Lord of the Rings
    • 9. THE TRENCHES AND THE MARSHES "They lie in all the pools, pale faces, deep deep under the dark water. I saw them: grim faces and evil, noble faces and sad. Many faces proud and fair, with weeds in their silver hair. But all foul, all rotting, all dead." -J. R. R. Tolkien, "The Passage of the Marshes", The Two Towers
    • 10. SAM AS A SOLDIER "My 'Sam Gamgee' is indeed a reflection of the English soldier, of the privates and batmen I knew in the 1914 war, and recognized as so far superior to myself." - J. R. R. Tolkien
    • 11. BEAUTY AMIDST DEVASTATION Far above the Ephel Duath in the West the night-sky was still dim and pale. There, peeping among the cloud-wrack above a dark tor high in the mountains, Sam saw a white star twinkle for a while. The beauty of it smote his heart, as he looked up out of the forsaken land, and courage returned to him. For like a shaft, clear and cold, the thought pierced him that in the end, the Shadow was only a small and passing thing; there was light and high beauty forever beyond its reach. - J. R. R. Tolkien, "The Land of Shadow," The Return of the King
    • 12. BEAUTY AMIDST DEVASTATION The stars shine brilliantly and (these trenches facing north) I gaze at The Plough dipping towards High Wood. What joy it is to know that you in England and I out here at least can look upon the same beauty in the sky! … They have become seers – images of divine stability – guardians of a peace and order beyond the power of weak and petty madness. … They, at least, will outlast the war and still be beautiful. - Max Plowman, "Night in the Trenches," A Subaltern on the Somme
    • 13. A LASTING IMPACT "… I have been too deeply hurt, Sam. I tried to save the Shire, and it has been saved, but not for me. It must often be so, Sam, when things are in danger: someone has to give them up, lose them so that others may keep them." -J. R. R. Tolkien "The Grey Havens," The Return of the King