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  • http://www.indochinalegend.com/images/Tintuc/Italian_photos.jpg_511052008_2_S_1.jpg
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/davekellam/482815089/
  • Most people who are not of Italian dissent most commonly know foods such as pizza and spaghetti as Italian food. Every region of Italy has its own style of cooking each food and their own eating habits. Even towns just miles apart.http://www.flickr.com/photos/justbecause/292762731/Volpi, Anna Marie. “A Passion for Cooking.” www.annamarievolpi.com. Anna Marie Volpi, Fall 2004. Web. 9 Feb. 2010. .
  • The Roman Empire traditionally dined by leaning on the left elbow while the right arm wasfree. The Romans did not eat the traditional Italian foods such as spaghetti and meatballs, sausage and peppers, or pizza. They imported all different kinds of food, wines and spices from all around the world. Once the Roman Empire fell the structure of Italian cuisine came into play by the Medieval times. http://www.annamariavolpi.com/what_is_italian_cooking.html
  • During the Medieval times the Italian cuisine starting coming into play. Since there was no central authority of power many fierce independent cities were created. When Austria and France would occasionally occupy the northern territories of Italy, they left behind new culinary influences. Cities in northern Italy developed through tradingMainly spices and fabricshttp://www.channel4learning.com/support/programmenotes/netnotes/images/normans/48.GIF http://www.annamariavolpi.com/what_is_italian_cooking.html
  • Each town in Italy has its own distinct way of making meats, cheese, wine and different types of bread. Every person has their own different type of way to make pasta sauce as well. There are also different words for pasta. Pasta is known as egg noodles in the north, and hard-boiled spaghetti in the south. Also, there are different shapes and sizes of pasta.SpicesFruitsVegetablesSeadas is a cheese ravioli drizzled with honey http://www.lifeinitaly.com/files/imagecache/medium/dreamstime_9167862.jpghttp://www.annamariavolpi.com/what_is_italian_cooking.html
  • In the country of Italy different towns and different regions have different types of food and different techniques of how they cook their food. In the top left picture there are a variety of different pastas but only a few. The bottom left picture shows a variety of cheeses consisting of sharp provolone, mozzarella, parmesan, locatelli, and Romano. The meats in the picture to the bottom right consist of bologna, prosciutto, veal, salami, sausage and pepperoni. The wines in the top right picture are just the basic red and white wines but there are many more. Smith, Jeff. The Frugal Gourmet Cooks Italian. New York, NY: William Morrow and Company Inc. , 1993. Print.http://media-2.web.britannica.com/eb-media/23/623-004-1C568E49.gifhttp://www.reillydairy.com/pics/italian_style_cheese.jpghttp://s3.amazonaws.com/hgl/assets/2456/italian_wine_blog.jpg
  • This picture is on the border of Switzerland and Italy. In Northern Italy there is less use of olive oil and more use of butter. Pasta is used but the because of the countryside where grains and rice are grown there is more use of risotto and polenta. Also, game or fowl are used as main courses. Such as rabbit, or quail. Seafood is also used a lot around the coasts and rivers. http://www.flickr.com/photos/babyboomers/2885619847/http://www.lifeinitaly.com/food/italian-regional-food.asp
  • An undermined traditional food of Italy. For Southern Italy pasta is the popular dish but in Northern Italy the key component of a meal is polenta. Known to some as Italian grits. Made from grains and was easy to make so it was common link to the food of poverty. Eaten in the roman times.Smith, Jeff. The Frugal Gourmet Cooks Italian. New York, NY: William Morrow and Company Inc. , 1993. Print.http://www.gourmet.com/images/food/2009/03/fo-polenta608.jpg
  • The cities of northern Italy became rich off of the creation of a culture of fresh pasta. In northern Italy dry macaroni was and item of mass production but the production of fresh pasta was considered a luxury item. Fresh pasta was associated with eggs, cheese, sugar, cream and other expensive items which made it such a high class item in northern Italy. Even though pasta is a long tradition in Italy it was not originated there but it was perfected there. Spaghetti was first brought over to Europe in the late 13th century by Marco Polo. Fresh pasta becomes a luxury item.Most spectacular recipes found in northern ItalyVolpi, Anna Marie. “A Passion for Cooking.” www.annamarievolpi.com. Anna Marie Volpi, Fall 2004. Web. 9 Feb. 2010. .
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/moonjazz/Town near the city of Naples.
  • While northern Italy had many small independent cities, southern Italy was mostly a unified region for a long time. Since southern Italy was cut off from the main trading routes in northern Europe, the southern Italians had to make the best with what they had. Moreover, southern Italy created the spectacular well known dishes such as spaghetti and pizza. The poor people of southern Italy exported these types of foods around different origins and regions in Europe. These dishes became very popular everywhere.Smith, Jeff. The Frugal Gourmet Cooks Italian. New York, NY: William Morrow and Company Inc. , 1993. Print.
  • Dry macaroni was special because it was very easily stored, traded and transported throughout many regions of Italy and even the world. Macaroni became present in Sicily as typical item to be cooked almost every evening. When the demand for dry macaroni became higher it was traded all throughout Italy and it was a big hit in Naples, Italy.Present in Sicily then moved to Naples in the 1700’sDry pasta started its journey across the worldhttp://www.flickr.com/photos/smitten/2456084918/Volpi, Anna Marie. “A Passion for Cooking.” www.annamarievolpi.com. Anna Marie Volpi, Fall 2004. Web. 9 Feb. 2010. .
  • Making homemade pasta is not as hard as people think it may be. This task does require some effort but it is indeed a fun process. When you go to stores to buy pasta there are only certain types and shapes of pasta to purchase but when you make your own pasta you can differentiate the size and the shape of the pasta. You can also make different flavored pasta. Traditional Italian homes make their own pasta usually unless there are complications. Boni, Ada, Matilde La Rosa, and Mario A. Pei. The Talisman Italian Cook Book . New York, NY: Crown Publishers Inc. , 1970. Print.http://www.flickr.com/photos/97928958@N00/344024244
  • To make homemade pasta, you must first take a few cups of flour and make into a mound. Scoop out the middle of the mound and add eggs. Whisk the eggs in the hole and then incorporate the flour into the egg. Once the egg and flour are mixed together then you kneed the dough and once finished, roll into a ball. Finally, cut the bal into three even pieces.
  • Once the dough is ready to be transformed into pasta you must take a pasta make and set it up on a table or counter. Take the three pieces of dough separately and roll through the rollers starting at the number 7 and working your down to 1. Once all the dough has been rolled through each number several times flour the dough and now you are ready to start your pasta.
  • Once each piece of dough is completely flat and smooth, select the type of pasta you want to make and connect it to the pasta roller. Take each individual piece of dough and roll it through the specific cutter. Once you have your desired pasta shapes then lay out on to a table and flour to make sure that they do not stick together.
  • Pizza napoletena in Naples is known as a disc of dough on which tomato is spread. Once Christopher Columbus returned from the newly discovered world one of the many thing he brought to Europe with him was the tomato plant. Not until 1733 was the new discover of tomatoes used. In Naples in 1733 Vincenzo Corrado Oritano who was head chef at Emanuel of Francavilla finally used the tomatoes and turned them into sauces which was used on pasta and pizza. “A disc of dough on which tomato is spread.”http://www.flickr.com/photos/secretsamba/847511941/Middione, Carlo. “The Food of Southern Italy.” http://www.epicurean.com. Fezzwig Publishing Co. , 2008. Web. 22 Nov. 2009. .
  • Pizzerias were first started in the city of Naples and soon became known all over Italy. The most popular types of pizza in Naples were the “marinara” and the “Margherita.” The Margherita pizza was offered to the queen of Italy when she visited the city of Naples. Pizzerias were established all throughout Italy.Sailhac, Arlene Feltman. Rustic Italian Cooking. New Yro, New York: Black Dog and Leventhal Publishers, Inc., 1995. Print.
  • Sicily was occupied by many different regions and countries throughout time. The occupancy of Greeks, Romans, Normans, Arabic's and the Spanish left Sicily with many different culinary techniques, cultures and customs. The Arabic culture had a huge effect on Sicilian cuisine. The use of apricots, sugar, sweet melons, rice, saffron, nutmeg, raisins and cinnamon were only a few of the contributions to a delicious Sicilian meal."To have seen Italy without having seen Sicily, is not to have seen Italy at all." Smith, Jeff. The Frugal Gourmet Cooks Italian. New York, NY: William Morrow and Company Inc. , 1993. Print.http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/b/ba/Flag_of_Sicily_%28revised%29.svg/210px-Flag_of_Sicily_%28revised%29.svg.png
  • A luxury to the Italian people known as Sorbetto was left by the Arabic culture. Known to Americans as Sherbet, this delicious treat is contrived of fruit syrup and diluted with water. Mt. Etna provided the ice to for the Sherbet. Once the “Sorbetto” became a big hit in Italy, it soon moved to Paris, France and once it moved to other countries the name was changed to “Gelato.” A most famous desert known as SherbetSarbat is what the Arabics left in SicilySorbetto is what the Italians called itSherbet is known by Americanshttp://www.beloblog.com/ProJo_Blogs/kelsea/gelato.bmphttp://www.flickr.com/photos/34166194@N00/2866491347
  • Cheese has been around for 8 thousand years but was adopted by the Romans. They turned making cheese into a fine art. The Romans came up with new ways to make cheese. They had different kitchens for making cheese and people could also bring their own cheese to certain kitchens to get their cheese smoked. While the Roman Empire was expanding, the new techniques and secrets were formed of making cheese. Once the Empire fell, territories were separated and new styles of cheeses were created from each region. http://www.cranesdeli.com/images/ItalianCheese.JPGhttp://www.articlealley.com/article_920060_26.html
  • As the Roman Empire fell and the dark ages began cheese’s popularity fell due to the fact that people considered it unhealthy. In the 19th century the popularity of cheese began to grow across Italy. Factories were being built to produce different kinds of cheese. In Italy up until the 20th century, cheese was always thought of as a specialty food. Cheese becomes mass produced across the ItalySoon across the worldhttp://www.articlealley.com/article_920060_26.html
  • Provolone – An all purpose cheese. Appears in various shapes. Can be mild or sharp. Fontinavald’aosta – One of oldest in Italy. Dense and slightly elastic. Slight nutty flavor with hint of mild honey. Dessert cheese. Gorgonzola – Creamy but firm blue cheese. Can be mild or sharp depending on how long it has aged. Good in salads or for dips. Mozzarella – Mild, fragrant and delicate. Great summer meal when combined with tomato, fresh basil and olive oil. Made in Southern Italy from water buffalo. Introduced by India in 16th century. Now made from cows milk. http://www.e-rcps.com/pasta/inf/cheese.shtml
  • Bread is taken very seriously in the Italian culture. Good Italian bread is a mix of a few things such as it is unsweetened, yeast-leavened and baked into a think oblong loaf with tapered ends. French bread is typically long and crusty while the typical Italian loaf of bread is about 1 foot long and about 6 to 10 inches thick. This is because over several hours the yeast has this type of affect on the bread. The inside of the bread is moist and porous because this allows to absorb toppings. (olive oil, tomatoes) http://www.dianasbakery.com/img%5Cgallery%5Cbread%5Cbread_italian.jpghttp://www.bread-maker.net/Bread-Types/Italian-Bread.htm
  • Italian bread was brought to America in the 18th century by Italian immigrants. It grew very popular very quickly in the states. Many different types of regional or seasonal ingredients and herbs have been added to the breads over the years. Today in America it is commonly used for deli sandwiches, on the side of soup and topped with olive oil for an appetizer. http://www.bread-maker.net/Bread-Types/Italian-Bread.htmhttp://www.terragalleria.com/images/black-white/us-ne/usny2984-bw.jpeg
  • Italians take pride in cooking and preparing their food for themselves and other people. Over the years as people learned different ways of cooking different kinds of food, they have also created their own way of eating the food. Italian food brings families together and unites a family in just one meal. Typically in a traditional Italian home, dinner can last for a few hours. Not only are these families eating but they are conversing and having a good time. http://www.flickr.com/photos/alkol/3861145515/Smith, Jeff. The Frugal Gourmet Cooks Italian. New York, NY: William Morrow and Company Inc. , 1993. Print.
  • Food in Italy is a big part of bringing together family and friends and keeping them together. Breakfast in Italy usually consists of rolls and butter with strong coffee or espresso and or fruit and juice. Traditionally lunch was usually a large meal consisting pasta and a type of meat or fish. Dinner at home sometimes consisted of the leftovers from lunch and took place usually later that night and not early during the day. http://www.flickr.com/photos/34894709@N00/2908696Smith, Jeff. The Frugal Gourmet Cooks Italian. New York, NY: William Morrow and Company Inc. , 1993. Print.
  • Traditionally in an Italian household, during dinner time almost the whole family is invited for a long meal. The host will prepare more food than can be eaten by the guests. This is okay though because normally the host will let the guests take leftovers. Once everyone has arrived for the meal, the long dinner will begin only if all of the food is done. Traditionally an Italian dinner can last anywhere from 1 to 3 hours.Smith, Jeff. The Frugal Gourmet Cooks Italian. New York, NY: William Morrow and Company Inc. , 1993. Print.
  • An Italian dinner is not all for satisfying the hunger, but is a way for families to come together to converse and socialize with one another. In most cases a traditional Italian family will not start dinner untill later at night. This is so because one, all of the family must arrive before anyone can start eating and a lot of food must be prepared. Usually an Italian restaurant in Italy starts of the dinner with Antipasti, then a pasta dish followed by a meat or fish dish. Also, a side dish is served which usually is a vegetable. Finally there is the desert which is not mandatory but usually an espresso is ordered.Sailhac, Arlene Feltman. Rustic Italian Cooking. New Yro, New York: Black Dog and Leventhal Publishers, Inc., 1995. Print.
  • The traditional seven fish dinner is on Christmas eve because meat is not eaten on that day due to the birth of Christ. Some say that the seven fishes represent the number of days it took God to create the earth. In Italy there are many different beliefs and styles of celebrating the seven fish dinner. Some use only three fishes representing the three Wise Men and others use up to thirteen fishes for the thirteen apostles.Esposito, Mary Ann. Celebrations Italian Style. New York, NY: William Morrow and Company Inc. , 1995. Print.
  • In conclusion, I believe that I learned a lot about the history of where most of the traditional Italian foods come from. Little did some people know that a lot of the food actually originated from other countries and regions throughout the world. Moreover, it is amazing how food is able to have the power to bring families together to communicate and rejoice with one another.

Sgp ppt Sgp ppt Presentation Transcript

  • Italian Cuisine
  • Overview
    Thesis Statement
    Self Relevance
    What is Italian Cooking?
    The History
    Different Types and Styles
    Northern Italy
    Southern Italy
    Homemade Pasta
    Cheese and Bread
    Tradition and Culture
  • Thesis Statement
    The history of Italian food comes from a long chain of diverse cultures. In an Italian family not only does food satisfy an empty stomach but it serves as a purpose for family to come together and communicate with each other.
  • Self Relevance
    Self Relevance
  • What is Italian Cooking
    http://www.annamariavolpi.com/what_is_italian_cooking.html
  • Roman Empire
  • Medieval Banquets
  • Different Styles
  • Different Types
  • Northern Italy
  • Polenta
  • Fresh Pasta
  • Southern Italy
  • Southern Italy
    “Dry Pasta is the greatest contribution from Southern Italy.”
  • Southern Italy
  • Homemade Pasta
  • Making Pasta
  • Making Pasta
  • Making Pasta
  • The Birth of Pizza
  • Pizza in Naples
  • Sicily
    "To have seen Italy without having seen Sicily, is not to have seen Italy at all."
  • Sherbet
  • Italian Cheese
  • Specialty Food
  • 400 Cheeses
  • Italian Bread
  • Brought to America
  • The Culture
  • Food in Daily Life
  • Family Meals
  • Dinner Time
  • Seven Fishes
  • Conclusion
  • Application
  • Work Cited
    Bisignano, Alphonse. Cooking the Italian Way. Minneapolis, Minnesota : Lerner Publications Company , 2002. Print.
    Blume, Maia. “A Nose for Truffles.” Crain’s New York Business Feb. 2009: 44-47. WebFeat. Web. 5 Nov. 2009. <http://wfxsearch.webfeat.org//>.
    Boni, Ada. The Talisman Cook Book. New York, New York: Crown Publishers, Inc. , 1950. Print.
    Boni, Ada, Matilde La Rosa, and Mario A. Pei. The Talisman Italian Cook Book . New York, NY: Crown Publishers Inc. , 1970. Print.
    Demitri, Justin, and Paolo Nascimbeni. “Food and Wines.” LifeinItaly.com. N.p., May 2007. Web. 22 Nov. 2009. <http://www.lifeinitaly.com//regional-food.asp>.
  • Work Cited
    Esposito, Mary Ann. Celebrations Italian Style. New York, NY: William Morrow and Company Inc. , 1995. Print.
    Feltman-Sailhac, Arlene. Rustic Italian Cooking. New York, NY: Black Dog & Leventhal Publishers Inc. , 1995. Print.
    Middione, Carlo. “The Food of Southern Italy.” http://www.epicurean.com. Fezzwig Publishing Co. , 2008. Web. 22 Nov. 2009. <http://www.epicurean.com//of-southern-italy.html>.
    Sailhac, Arlene Feltman. Rustic Italian Cooking. New Yro, New York: Black Dog and Leventhal Publishers, Inc., 1995. Print.
  • Work Cited
    Smith, Jeff. The Frugal Gourmet Cooks Italian. New York, NY: William Morrow and Company Inc. , 1993. Print.
    Woodward, Stephanie. “From Italy, With Love.” Ladie’s Home Journal 4 Apr. 2008: 23-27. WebFeat. Web. 5 Nov. 2009. <http://wfxsearch.webfeat.org//>.
    Florence, Tyler, et al. “Recipes and Cooking.” www.foodnetwork.com. Television Food Network , Winter 2010. Web. 12 Apr. 2010. <http://www.foodnetwork.com/>.