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Speical Ed. Presentation (Ed) Speical Ed. Presentation (Ed) Presentation Transcript

  • Emotional Disorders
  • Emotional Disorders Anxiety Disorder Mood Disorder Oppositional Defiant Disorder Conduct Disorder Schizophrenia
  • Emotional Disorders Anxiety Disorder Mood Disorder Oppositional Defiant Disorder Conduct Disorder Schizophrenia L aura, Ali , Jo ey, K a it ly n, An th ony View slide
  • Emotional Disorders, as defined by IDEA include the following characteristics over a long period of time that directly effect a students educational performance: View slide
  • Emotional Disorders, as defined by IDEA include the following characteristics over a long period of time that directly effect a students educational performance: An inability to learn that can’t be explained by intellectual, sensory, or health factors
  • Emotional Disorders, as defined by IDEA include the following characteristics over a long period of time that directly effect a students educational performance: An inability to learn that can’t be explained by intellectual, sensory, or health factors Inability to build or maintain quality, healthy relationships with peers and educators.
  • Emotional Disorders, as defined by IDEA include the following characteristics over a long period of time that directly effect a students educational performance: An inability to learn that can’t be explained by intellectual, sensory, or health factors Inability to build or maintain quality, healthy relationships with peers and educators. Inappropriate types of behavior or feelings under normal circumstances
  • Emotional Disorders, as defined by IDEA include the following characteristics over a long period of time that directly effect a students educational performance: An inability to learn that can’t be explained by intellectual, sensory, or health factors Inability to build or maintain quality, healthy relationships with peers and educators. Inappropriate types of behavior or feelings under normal circumstances Generally unhappy or depressed
  • Emotional Disorders, as defined by IDEA include the following characteristics over a long period of time that directly effect a students educational performance: An inability to learn that can’t be explained by intellectual, sensory, or health factors Inability to build or maintain quality, healthy relationships with peers and educators. Inappropriate types of behavior or feelings under normal circumstances Generally unhappy or depressed Often develop physical symptoms or fears associated with school or personal problems
  • Anxiety Disorder
  • Anxiety Disorder Defined as: excessive fear, worry, or uneasiness
  • Anxiety Disorder Defined as: excessive fear, worry, or uneasiness Is the most common childhood disorder
  • Anxiety Disorder Defined as: excessive fear, worry, or uneasiness Is the most common childhood disorder Tend to worry a lot about school and assignments
  • Anxiety Disorder Defined as: excessive fear, worry, or uneasiness Is the most common childhood disorder Tend to worry a lot about school and assignments Often isolated from their peers and tend to avoid majority of social situations
  • Examples of Anxiety Disorders
  • Examples of Anxiety Disorders Anxiety Disorder- excessive and intense fear associated with separating from home, family and others
  • Examples of Anxiety Disorders Anxiety Disorder- excessive and intense fear associated with separating from home, family and others Generalized anxiety-overwhelming worry not caused by any recent experience
  • Examples of Anxiety Disorders Anxiety Disorder- excessive and intense fear associated with separating from home, family and others Generalized anxiety-overwhelming worry not caused by any recent experience Phobia-unrealistic, overwhelming worry not caused by a recent experience
  • Anxiety Disorders Cont.
  • Anxiety Disorders Cont. Panic-Overwhelming panic attacks resulting in rapid heartbeat, dizziness, and/or other physical problems
  • Anxiety Disorders Cont. Panic-Overwhelming panic attacks resulting in rapid heartbeat, dizziness, and/or other physical problems Post Traumatic Stress- flashbacks and other recurrent symptoms following exposure to an extremely distressing or dangerous event such as witnessing violence or a hurricane
  • Anxiety Disorders Cont. Panic-Overwhelming panic attacks resulting in rapid heartbeat, dizziness, and/or other physical problems Post Traumatic Stress- flashbacks and other recurrent symptoms following exposure to an extremely distressing or dangerous event such as witnessing violence or a hurricane Obsessive Compulsive Disorder- obsessions manifesting as repetitive, persistent, and intrusive impulses, images, or thoughts and/of compulsions manifesting as repetitive, stereotypical behaviors
  • Mood Disorders
  • Mood Disorders Defined as: extreme deviation in either a depressed or an elevated direction or sometimes both directions at the same time
  • Mood Disorders Defined as: extreme deviation in either a depressed or an elevated direction or sometimes both directions at the same time Can occur at any age
  • Mood Disorders Defined as: extreme deviation in either a depressed or an elevated direction or sometimes both directions at the same time Can occur at any age Includes depression and bipolar disorder
  • Mood Disorders Defined as: extreme deviation in either a depressed or an elevated direction or sometimes both directions at the same time Can occur at any age Includes depression and bipolar disorder Both disorders effect students school success and their interactions with peers
  • Mood Disorders Defined as: extreme deviation in either a depressed or an elevated direction or sometimes both directions at the same time Can occur at any age Includes depression and bipolar disorder Both disorders effect students school success and their interactions with peers Depression is most frequent in Adolescent Females
  • Mood Disorders Defined as: extreme deviation in either a depressed or an elevated direction or sometimes both directions at the same time Can occur at any age Includes depression and bipolar disorder Both disorders effect students school success and their interactions with peers Depression is most frequent in Adolescent Females Tend to have lower academic scores and score lower on intelligence tests during an episode
  • Students with depression may experience these symptoms
  • Students with depression may experience these symptoms Depression is most frequent in Adolescent Females
  • Students with depression may experience these symptoms Depression is most frequent in Adolescent Females Motivation- losing interest in play, friends, and schoolwork, with a resulting decline in grades
  • Students with depression may experience these symptoms Depression is most frequent in Adolescent Females Motivation- losing interest in play, friends, and schoolwork, with a resulting decline in grades Physical Well-being: eating or sleeping too much or too little, disregarding hygiene, or making vague physical complaints
  • Students with depression may experience these symptoms Depression is most frequent in Adolescent Females Motivation- losing interest in play, friends, and schoolwork, with a resulting decline in grades Physical Well-being: eating or sleeping too much or too little, disregarding hygiene, or making vague physical complaints Thoughts- perhaps believing he or she is ugly and unable to to anything right and that life is hopeless
  • Oppositional Defiant Disorder
  • Oppositional Defiant Disorder Definition- causes a pattern of negativistic, hostile, disobedient, and defiant behaviors
  • Oppositional Defiant Disorder Definition- causes a pattern of negativistic, hostile, disobedient, and defiant behaviors Students must have some of the following
  • Oppositional Defiant Disorder Definition- causes a pattern of negativistic, hostile, disobedient, and defiant behaviors Students must have some of the following loss of temper arguments with adults Refusal to cooperate with adult requests frequent rule-breaking expressed resentfulness and angered
  • Oppositional Defiant Disorder Definition- causes a pattern of negativistic, hostile, disobedient, and defiant behaviors Students must have some of the following loss of temper deliberate annoyance of others arguments with adults tendency for vindictiveness Refusal to cooperate with adult blaming others for mistakes requests misbehavior frequent rule-breaking low self-esteem expressed resentfulness and angered easily annoyed
  • Conduct Disorder
  • Conduct Disorder Definition-A persistent pattern of antisocial behavior that significantly interferes with other’s rights or with schools’ and communities’ behavioral expectations.
  • Conduct Disorder Definition-A persistent pattern of antisocial behavior that significantly interferes with other’s rights or with schools’ and communities’ behavioral expectations. Usually have very little empathy for others
  • Conduct Disorder Definition-A persistent pattern of antisocial behavior that significantly interferes with other’s rights or with schools’ and communities’ behavioral expectations. Usually have very little empathy for others Extremely high self esteem or extremely low.
  • Conduct Disorder Definition-A persistent pattern of antisocial behavior that significantly interferes with other’s rights or with schools’ and communities’ behavioral expectations. Usually have very little empathy for others Extremely high self esteem or extremely low. 50% of students with conduct disorder are diagnosed with ADHD.
  • Conduct Disorder Definition-A persistent pattern of antisocial behavior that significantly interferes with other’s rights or with schools’ and communities’ behavioral expectations. Usually have very little empathy for others Extremely high self esteem or extremely low. 50% of students with conduct disorder are diagnosed with ADHD. Conflictual relationships with adults.
  • Conduct Disorder Definition-A persistent pattern of antisocial behavior that significantly interferes with other’s rights or with schools’ and communities’ behavioral expectations. Usually have very little empathy for others Extremely high self esteem or extremely low. 50% of students with conduct disorder are diagnosed with ADHD. Conflictual relationships with adults. Linked with psycho-social factors such as childhood abuse or living in a rough neighborhood/poverty.
  • Four categories of Conduct Disorder include:
  • Four categories of Conduct Disorder include: Aggressive conduct that results in harm to people or animals
  • Four categories of Conduct Disorder include: Aggressive conduct that results in harm to people or animals Property destruction
  • Four categories of Conduct Disorder include: Aggressive conduct that results in harm to people or animals Property destruction Deceitfulness and theft
  • Four categories of Conduct Disorder include: Aggressive conduct that results in harm to people or animals Property destruction Deceitfulness and theft Serious rule violations
  • Schizophrenia
  • Schizophrenia Schizophrenia is commonly misdiagnosed as a mood disorder, and often begins in late adolescence and is rarer than most other common emotional disorders.
  • Schizophrenia Schizophrenia is commonly misdiagnosed as a mood disorder, and often begins in late adolescence and is rarer than most other common emotional disorders. Treated with medication and psychosocial interventions. The drugs are antipsychotics that include anti-depressants and mood stabilizers.
  • Characteristics of Schizophrenia
  • Characteristics of Schizophrenia Hallucinations Withdrawal Delusions Inability to experience pleasure Loss of contact with reality Disorganized speech
  • External Behaviors of All ED
  • External Behaviors of All ED External behaviors: Exhibit high intensity but low frequency, and are often referred to special education classroom because their classroom behavior is so disruptive. Externalizing behaviors could include lighting fires, assaulting someone, or exhibiting cruelty.
  • External Behaviors of All ED External behaviors: Exhibit high intensity but low frequency, and are often referred to special education classroom because their classroom behavior is so disruptive. Externalizing behaviors could include lighting fires, assaulting someone, or exhibiting cruelty. Subject to zero-tolerance, but if evaluated and diagnosed and receiving special education service, they are protected from total cessation under IDEA.
  • Internal behavior
  • Internal behavior Internal behaviors: Withdrawal, depression, anxiety, obsessions or compulsions.
  • Internal behavior Internal behaviors: Withdrawal, depression, anxiety, obsessions or compulsions. Poor social skills and less accepted by peers.
  • Internal behavior Internal behaviors: Withdrawal, depression, anxiety, obsessions or compulsions. Poor social skills and less accepted by peers. Try to blend into the background, not be noticed.
  • Internal behavior Internal behaviors: Withdrawal, depression, anxiety, obsessions or compulsions. Poor social skills and less accepted by peers. Try to blend into the background, not be noticed. Because their behavior is not as disruptive, they’re disorder is often overlooked or misidentified.
  • NAME THAT EMOTIONAL DISORDER
  • If you guessed YOUR RIGHT!!!
  • If you guessed Oppositional Defiant Disorder YOUR RIGHT!!!
  • If You Guessed YOUR RIGHT!!!
  • If You Guessed Schizophrenia YOUR RIGHT!!!
  • If you guessed YOUR RIGHT!!!
  • If you guessed Anxiety Disorder/ Obsessive Compulsive Disorder YOUR RIGHT!!!
  • If you guessed YOUR RIGHT!!!
  • If you guessed Conduct Disorder YOUR RIGHT!!!
  • If you guessed YOUR RIGHT!!!
  • If you guessed Mood Disorder/ Depression YOUR RIGHT!!!
  • Prevelance
  • 1% of students served for ED during the 1999-200 School Year
  • 1% of students served for ED during the 1999-200 School Year A more accurate percentage is 9-10%
  • 1% of students served for ED during the 1999-200 School Year A more accurate percentage is 9-10% Why are ED’s so under-identified?
  • Causes of Emotional Disorders
  • Biological
  • Biological Environmental
  • Biological Environmental School Related
  • Diagnosis
  • Based on criteria in observations and interactions
  • Evaluating Students with Emotional Disorders
  • Step 1: Observation
  • Step 1: Observation Teacher and parents observe and look for the 5 elements of emotional or behavioral disorders.
  • Step 1: Observation Teacher and parents observe and look for the 5 elements of emotional or behavioral disorders. The 5 elements: (1)Inability to learn, (2)Inability to build or maintain satisfactory relationships, (3) Inappropriate behavior, (4) unhappiness or depression, and (5) physical symptoms or fears.
  • Step 2: Screening
  • Step 2: Screening Classroom work products are looked at along with group intelligence tests, group achievement tests, and even vision and hearing screenings.
  • Step 3: Pre-referral/Referral
  • Step 3: Pre-referral/Referral The teacher implements suggestions from school based team. If the student is not responsive he or she will be referred.
  • Step 4: Nondiscriminatory Evaluation
  • Step 4: Nondiscriminatory Evaluation Many things are taken into account like the individualized intelligence test and achievement test, their behavior rating scale, and assessments of strength and social skills/personality. The Scale for Assessing Emotional Disturbance is used.
  • Step 5: Determination
  • Step 5: Determination The nondiscriminatory evaluation team determines that the student has emotional or behavioral disorders and needs special education and related services.
  • Observation of “Ali”
  • Observation of “Ali” Teacher observes physical signs such as: bruising, cuts, malnourishment, or noticeable pain Teacher observes socials signs such as: withdrawn behavior, distrust, depression, or moods of unhappiness
  • Screening of “Ali”
  • Screening of “Ali” Teacher encourages child to participate in group or social activities Teacher tries to build confidence by encouraging the child
  • Pre-referral/Referral of “Ali”
  • Pre-referral/Referral of “Ali” “Ali” does not respond to the teachers attempts to be involved in social and group activities, and continues to seclude herself, and show signs of depression
  • Nondiscriminatory Evaluation of “Ali”
  • Nondiscriminatory Evaluation of “Ali” In the scale for assessing Emotional Disturbances “Ali” scored on the five elements in the IDEA definition:
  • Nondiscriminatory Evaluation of “Ali” In the scale for assessing Emotional Disturbances “Ali” scored on the five elements in the IDEA definition: (1)Inability to learn (0-3)
  • Nondiscriminatory Evaluation of “Ali” In the scale for assessing Emotional Disturbances “Ali” scored on the five elements in the IDEA definition: (1)Inability to learn (0-3) Score of 1
  • Nondiscriminatory Evaluation of “Ali” In the scale for assessing Emotional Disturbances “Ali” scored on the five elements in the IDEA definition: (1)Inability to learn (0-3) Score of 1 (2)Inability to build or maintain satisfactory relationships
  • Nondiscriminatory Evaluation of “Ali” In the scale for assessing Emotional Disturbances “Ali” scored on the five elements in the IDEA definition: (1)Inability to learn (0-3) Score of 1 (2)Inability to build or maintain satisfactory relationships score of 0
  • Nondiscriminatory Evaluation of “Ali” In the scale for assessing Emotional Disturbances “Ali” scored on the five elements in the IDEA definition: (1)Inability to learn (0-3) Score of 1 (2)Inability to build or maintain satisfactory relationships score of 0 (3) Inappropriate behavior
  • Nondiscriminatory Evaluation of “Ali” In the scale for assessing Emotional Disturbances “Ali” scored on the five elements in the IDEA definition: (1)Inability to learn (0-3) Score of 1 (2)Inability to build or maintain satisfactory relationships score of 0 (3) Inappropriate behavior score of 3
  • Nondiscriminatory Evaluation of “Ali” In the scale for assessing Emotional Disturbances “Ali” scored on the five elements in the IDEA definition: (1)Inability to learn (0-3) Score of 1 (2)Inability to build or maintain satisfactory relationships score of 0 (3) Inappropriate behavior score of 3 (4) unhappiness or depression
  • Nondiscriminatory Evaluation of “Ali” In the scale for assessing Emotional Disturbances “Ali” scored on the five elements in the IDEA definition: (1)Inability to learn (0-3) Score of 1 (2)Inability to build or maintain satisfactory relationships score of 0 (3) Inappropriate behavior score of 3 (4) unhappiness or depression score of 0
  • Nondiscriminatory Evaluation of “Ali” In the scale for assessing Emotional Disturbances “Ali” scored on the five elements in the IDEA definition: (1)Inability to learn (0-3) Score of 1 (2)Inability to build or maintain satisfactory relationships score of 0 (3) Inappropriate behavior score of 3 (4) unhappiness or depression score of 0 (5) physical symptoms or fears.
  • Nondiscriminatory Evaluation of “Ali” In the scale for assessing Emotional Disturbances “Ali” scored on the five elements in the IDEA definition: (1)Inability to learn (0-3) Score of 1 (2)Inability to build or maintain satisfactory relationships score of 0 (3) Inappropriate behavior score of 3 (4) unhappiness or depression score of 0 (5) physical symptoms or fears. score of 0
  • Determination of “Ali’s” ED
  • Determination of “Ali’s” ED “Ali” is diagnosed with an mood disorder, more specifically depression. “Ali” also shows signs of anxiety disorders such as generalized anxiety
  • Progress in General Curriculum
  • Measuring a Students Progress
  • Measuring a Students Progress Use the Social Skill Ratings System, which consists of 3 ratings from the student, teacher, and parent which allows students to report the frequency and importance of a skill and how well they learn it
  • Inclusion Tips
  • Inclusion Tips What would you do?
  • Inclusion Tips What would you do? Student refuses to follow directions and uses inappropriate language.
  • Inclusion Tips What would you do? Student refuses to follow directions and uses inappropriate language. Student fights with other students and is always on the defensive.
  • Inclusion Tips What would you do? Student refuses to follow directions and uses inappropriate language. Student fights with other students and is always on the defensive. Student is rarely on task and appears to have an inability to learn.
  • Inclusion Tips What would you do? Student refuses to follow directions and uses inappropriate language. Student fights with other students and is always on the defensive. Student is rarely on task and appears to have an inability to learn. Student is sad all of the time and does not interact with other student.
  • Inclusion Tips Game
  • Goals and Strategies
  • Academic/ Vocational Goals
  • Academic/ Vocational Goals Improve grades overall
  • Academic/ Vocational Goals Improve grades overall Set aside time outside of the classroom to work on schoolwork/ homework
  • Academic/ Vocational Goals Improve grades overall Set aside time outside of the classroom to work on schoolwork/ homework Be on time to class
  • Academic/ Vocational Goals Improve grades overall Set aside time outside of the classroom to work on schoolwork/ homework Be on time to class Will follow routines, instructions, and directions promptly
  • Personal Skill Goals
  • Personal Skill Goals Exhibit anger management
  • Personal Skill Goals Exhibit anger management Use acceptable voice tones as instructed
  • Personal Skill Goals Exhibit anger management Use acceptable voice tones as instructed Cope with stress in a healthy/positive manner
  • Personal Skill Goals Exhibit anger management Use acceptable voice tones as instructed Cope with stress in a healthy/positive manner Will be accountable for inappropriate actions
  • Social Skills Goals
  • Social Skills Goals Will interact with peers in a positive manner
  • Social Skills Goals Will interact with peers in a positive manner Will demonstrate respect for others and the property of others
  • Social Skills Goals Will interact with peers in a positive manner Will demonstrate respect for others and the property of others Work quietly without distracting others
  • Instructional Strategies
  • Instructional Strategies • Present materials at independent level, not frustration
  • Instructional Strategies • Present materials at independent level, not frustration level
  • Instructional Strategies • Present materials at independent level, not frustration level • Provide short, manageable tasks
  • Instructional Strategies • Present materials at independent level, not frustration level • Provide short, manageable tasks • Set short-term expectations
  • Instructional Strategies • Present materials at independent level, not frustration level • Provide short, manageable tasks • Set short-term expectations • Repeat directions frequently
  • Instructional Strategies • Present materials at independent level, not frustration level • Provide short, manageable tasks • Set short-term expectations • Repeat directions frequently • Use special education staff for problem solving
  • Instructional Strategies • Present materials at independent level, not frustration level • Provide short, manageable tasks • Set short-term expectations • Repeat directions frequently • Use special education staff for problem solving • Follow through on everything
  • Instructional Strategies • Present materials at independent level, not frustration level • Provide short, manageable tasks • Set short-term expectations • Repeat directions frequently • Use special education staff for problem solving • Follow through on everything • Be willing to modify classroom expectations and
  • Instructional Strategies • Present materials at independent level, not frustration level • Provide short, manageable tasks • Set short-term expectations • Repeat directions frequently • Use special education staff for problem solving • Follow through on everything • Be willing to modify classroom expectations and homework problems
  • Instructional Strategies Continued
  • Instructional Strategies Continued • Request students to demonstrate verbally their
  • Instructional Strategies Continued • Request students to demonstrate verbally their understanding of directions/expectations
  • Instructional Strategies Continued • Request students to demonstrate verbally their understanding of directions/expectations • Materials should be presented for all learning styles;
  • Instructional Strategies Continued • Request students to demonstrate verbally their understanding of directions/expectations • Materials should be presented for all learning styles; e.g., auditory, visual
  • Instructional Strategies Continued • Request students to demonstrate verbally their understanding of directions/expectations • Materials should be presented for all learning styles; e.g., auditory, visual • Use study skills support
  • Instructional Strategies Continued • Request students to demonstrate verbally their understanding of directions/expectations • Materials should be presented for all learning styles; e.g., auditory, visual • Use study skills support • Provide mini-breaks between lessons
  • Instructional Strategies Continued • Request students to demonstrate verbally their understanding of directions/expectations • Materials should be presented for all learning styles; e.g., auditory, visual • Use study skills support • Provide mini-breaks between lessons • Allow for peer tutoring
  • Instructional Strategies Continued • Request students to demonstrate verbally their understanding of directions/expectations • Materials should be presented for all learning styles; e.g., auditory, visual • Use study skills support • Provide mini-breaks between lessons • Allow for peer tutoring • Provide positive reinforcement
  • Instructional Strategies Continued • Request students to demonstrate verbally their understanding of directions/expectations • Materials should be presented for all learning styles; e.g., auditory, visual • Use study skills support • Provide mini-breaks between lessons • Allow for peer tutoring • Provide positive reinforcement • Individualize work assignments
  • Instructional Strategies Continued • Request students to demonstrate verbally their understanding of directions/expectations • Materials should be presented for all learning styles; e.g., auditory, visual • Use study skills support • Provide mini-breaks between lessons • Allow for peer tutoring • Provide positive reinforcement • Individualize work assignments • Structure classroom environment
  • Behavioral Strategies
  • Behavioral Strategies • Use positive reinforces
  • Behavioral Strategies • Use positive reinforces • Use behavior contracts
  • Behavioral Strategies • Use positive reinforces • Use behavior contracts • Model behavior
  • Behavioral Strategies • Use positive reinforces • Use behavior contracts • Model behavior • Do not place hands on students
  • Behavioral Strategies • Use positive reinforces • Use behavior contracts • Model behavior • Do not place hands on students • Keep a sense of humor and use it
  • Behavioral Strategies • Use positive reinforces • Use behavior contracts • Model behavior • Do not place hands on students • Keep a sense of humor and use it • Solve problems privately not publicly
  • Behavioral Strategies • Use positive reinforces • Use behavior contracts • Model behavior • Do not place hands on students • Keep a sense of humor and use it • Solve problems privately not publicly • When disciplining the student address the specific
  • Behavioral Strategies • Use positive reinforces • Use behavior contracts • Model behavior • Do not place hands on students • Keep a sense of humor and use it • Solve problems privately not publicly • When disciplining the student address the specific behavior and avoid any indication you dislike
  • Behavioral Strategies • Use positive reinforces • Use behavior contracts • Model behavior • Do not place hands on students • Keep a sense of humor and use it • Solve problems privately not publicly • When disciplining the student address the specific behavior and avoid any indication you dislike the student personally
  • Behavioral Strategies • Use positive reinforces • Use behavior contracts • Model behavior • Do not place hands on students • Keep a sense of humor and use it • Solve problems privately not publicly • When disciplining the student address the specific behavior and avoid any indication you dislike the student personally • Label exact behavior desired; do not be subtle
  • Behavioral Strategies Continued
  • Behavioral Strategies Continued • Give two choices only, either/or
  • Behavioral Strategies Continued • Give two choices only, either/or • Be firm, fair, and flexible
  • Behavioral Strategies Continued • Give two choices only, either/or • Be firm, fair, and flexible • Avoid setting the student up for failure
  • Behavioral Strategies Continued • Give two choices only, either/or • Be firm, fair, and flexible • Avoid setting the student up for failure • Do not put unrealistic expectations on the students
  • Behavioral Strategies Continued • Give two choices only, either/or • Be firm, fair, and flexible • Avoid setting the student up for failure • Do not put unrealistic expectations on the students • Define classroom expectations relating to behavior
  • Behavioral Strategies Continued • Give two choices only, either/or • Be firm, fair, and flexible • Avoid setting the student up for failure • Do not put unrealistic expectations on the students • Define classroom expectations relating to behavior and establish rules with the students
  • Behavioral Strategies Continued • Give two choices only, either/or • Be firm, fair, and flexible • Avoid setting the student up for failure • Do not put unrealistic expectations on the students • Define classroom expectations relating to behavior and establish rules with the students • Have rules posted around the room
  • Behavioral Strategies Continued • Give two choices only, either/or • Be firm, fair, and flexible • Avoid setting the student up for failure • Do not put unrealistic expectations on the students • Define classroom expectations relating to behavior and establish rules with the students • Have rules posted around the room • Make expectations clear
  • Behavioral Strategies Continued • Give two choices only, either/or • Be firm, fair, and flexible • Avoid setting the student up for failure • Do not put unrealistic expectations on the students • Define classroom expectations relating to behavior and establish rules with the students • Have rules posted around the room • Make expectations clear • Avoid power struggles
  • Behavioral Strategies Continued
  • Behavioral Strategies Continued • Individualize behavior plans
  • Behavioral Strategies Continued • Individualize behavior plans • Consistently interrelate with students
  • THE END!!!!
  • THE END!!!!
  • THE END!!!! Now you know what to look for in your students when you suspect an emotional disorder...YAY YOU!!!!