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The Arctic Peoples
The Arctic Peoples
The Arctic Peoples
The Arctic Peoples
The Arctic Peoples
The Arctic Peoples
The Arctic Peoples
The Arctic Peoples
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The Arctic Peoples

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  • 1. BRRRRR !<br />The Arctic Peoples<br />
  • 2. The marital customs among the Arctic People were not strictly monogamous and, in fact, many Inuit relationships were solely for sexual purpose. Open marriages, polygamy, divorce, and remarriage were known and practiced. Among some Inuit groups, if there were children, divorce required the approval of the community and particularly the agreement of the elders. Marriages were often arranged, sometimes in infancy, and occasionally forced on the couple by the community. The division in labour in traditional Inuit societies had a strong gender component, but it was not concrete. The men were traditionally hunters and fishermen and the women took care of the children, cleaned huts, sewed, processed food, and cooked. However, there are numerous examples of women who hunted, out of necessity or as a personal choice. At the same time men, who could be away from camp for several days at a time, would be expected to know how to sew and cook.<br />Society<br />
  • 3. The Arctic Peoples, specifically the Inuit, did not have a tangible legal system, and most governance was done by families and community decision. Shamans were considered to have the most power and were usually elders or strong men who assumed a &quot;leader&quot; status. Inuit traditional laws are anthropologically different from Western Law concepts. Many laws that were cencrete were not even written. ‘Customary Law’ was thought non-existent in Inuit society before the introduction of the Canadian legal system. Prior to about 1970, it is impossible to find even one reference to a Western observer who was aware that any form of governance existed among any Inuit people, however, there was a set way of doing things that had to be followed. These customs were assumed and could be met with punishment if abused.<br />Politics<br />
  • 4. All Inuit people lived a migratory lifestyle with small family groups wandering widely across the tundra, hunting caribou and fishing throughout the summer and fall. During the winter, they hunted seal on the ice, and when the warmer sun of spring began to melt their snow houses, they moved back to the shore where sleds and other winter gear was cached under piles of large rocks to protect them from marauding animals<br />Their revolutionary forms of technology enables the Inuit to live in the harshest conditions on Earth. Through resourcefulness, inner strength and their complex forms of technology they lived independently and often comfortably on the arctic tundra. When the warming trend became an issue between 900-1200 CE sea ice was reduced and opened up large areas of Arctic ice for bow-head whales and other large sea mammals. This also allowed Inuit, who experienced population pressure in Alaska, to range further east in their Kayaks and Unimaks.<br />Technology<br />
  • 5. The Inuit used a basic archaic barter system, where they would trade pelts, tools, and food for other necessities. In the arctic, all food, tools and water resources are highly valued, so rather than utilising a currency, they would simply trade items. This trade system is rather similar to what the basic Europeans used before they started using various currencies, so the concept that the Inuit had no economy is invalid.<br />Economy<br />
  • 6. Arctic Native Americans, or the Inuit, inhabited most northern parts of North America, reaching from Northern Alaska all the way across to Labrador, and even Greenland. The majority of their population, though, lived in what is now the North-West Territories and amongst the islands of the territories. There are many types of languages spoken; approximately twelve different languages with a near infinite amount of localized variations. That means inter-tribe communications was relatively difficult, although due to the sheer distance between tribes, was rarely a problem <br />Geography<br />
  • 7. The Inuit often had minor battles with other Native tribes. These were fought over food, or their tribe’s border. The Inuit who lived off of the Mackenzie River were often engaging in battle due to the fact that they had a very high population density. They fought with each other for supremacy but more often with other tribes for control of the waterfront. Other Inuit tribes were very segregated from other tribes and had no need to fight over food or land. The Inuit often fought with blunt objects such as clubs or other wooden or bone objects. They also used slightly more sophisticated weapons such as spears, harpoons and sometimes knives. Their knives served more of a culinary and non-warfare tool but they were also used when other weapons were not available. They often made their knives and spear heads out of jade because it was easier to find than other easily flinted rocks.<br />Warfare<br />
  • 8. The End<br /> Costa Chatzis, Candace Lickers,<br />Harrison Dickson, Brennan Abbott<br />

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