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Social Networking In Education

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  • 1. Social Networking in Education Amber Bingham
  • 2.
    • Beyond Social Networking: Building Toward Learning Communities
    • Social Networking in Schools: Incentives for Participation
    • Educator Use of Social Networking Lags Behind Interest
    Summary 1 Summary 2 Thoughts Summary 1 Summary 2 Thoughts Summary 1 Summary 2 Thoughts To Conclusion
  • 3. Beyond Social Networking: Building Toward Learning Communities Summary Part One
    • Social interactions and relationships can be used to help students learn
    • Provides students with an instant connection to the teacher and other students
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  • 4. Beyond Social Networking: Building Toward Learning Communities Summary Part Two
    • If used correctly can help students build important skills for their future
      • Simulation
      • Collective intelligence
      • Negotiation
    • If used with other types of online tools it can fully help students show their talents and gain knowledge
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  • 5. Beyond Social Networking: Building Toward Learning Communities My Thoughts
    • This article offers some good insights into using social networking in the classroom. I found some interesting and useful information:
      • Older people like social networking for connection and community building among professional and casual peers and friends.
      • If educators only integrate the ability of students to connect and socialize, deeper points of learning will be missed.
      • Specific instructional use is more effective and acceptable for students to understand why the teacher has created the space than if the teacher is just online for a social nature.
    • “ Use a variety of supporting tools to process information. Also understand that younger students are used to the whole multitasking idea and can, therefore, utilize a variety of tools at once (blogs, wikis, microblogs, etc.). This maximizes variety in how information is processed and applied.”
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  • 6. Social Networking In Schools: Incentives for Participation Summary Part 1
    • Before schools agree to use networking sites they must
      • emphasis on collaborative and planned activities
      • strong tools for students to express themselves
      • emphasis on bringing different kinds of students together
      • go along with how achievement is measured by the No Child Left Behind accountability system
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  • 7. Social Networking In Schools: Incentives for Participation Summary Part 2
    • ePals
      • Links together 200 counties
      • Focuses on
        • Biodiversity
        • Black history
        • Geography
        • Human rights
      • Useful tools for educators
      • Students gained skilled
        • computer literacy
        • critical-thinking abilities
        • global awareness
        • collaborative skills
        • multicultural friendships
        • writing skills
    • CultureQuest
      • Explore aspects of different cultures while doing projects
      • Work becomes part of a class website
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  • 8. Social Networking In Schools: Incentives for Participation My Thoughts
    • This article was informative and gave examples of many types of social networking sites. I found a lot of useful information and thought that the article was very positive in its portrayal of social networking and its benefits in the classroom and the accountability of using these sites.
      • 52 percent of all districts interviewed prohibited any use of social networking sites in school, yet 60 percent of students who use social networking talk about education topics online and more than 50 percent talk specifically about schoolwork.
      • Social networking activities have not been promoted in schools, in part, owing to how student achievement has been measured as mandated by the No Child Left Behind accountability system.
      • Everything that teachers do in their classrooms, beyond preparing youth for state standardized tests, would matter greatly and be taken into consideration in accountability, including their innovative teaching practices.
    • “ There are many ways to be social; there's more than one way to learn, and definitely a nearly infinite number of ways to form a network. But, you have a winner if you can put all three together in a social learning network in schools.”
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  • 9. Educator Use of Social Networking Lags Behind Interest Summary Part 1 Back to Menu
  • 10. Educator Use of Social Networking Lags Behind Interest Summary Part 2
    • A survey of 83,000 shows that teachers, librarians, and administers have interest in using social networking in education
    • Most of those surveyed are already on some sort of networking site
    • Those surveyed worried about using networking sites within education but would if the site was geared toward education
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  • 11. Educator Use of Social Networking Lags Behind Interest My Thoughts
    • The article was interesting and showed the interest that many educators have in using social networking in their class. It offered some insightful statistics from a survey.
      • Preliminary results released in September showed a majority of those surveyed who joined a social networking had, in fact, only joined Facebook.
      • A substantial number of those who expressed interest in social networking as a tool for education and educational community building said they would eagerly embrace the idea of a social networking site primarily geared toward educators.
      • Some of the teachers had the best of intentions to use the site(s) they joined to meet other teachers, discuss and share ideas, and communicate with students and parents, yet a relatively small number actually followed through.
    • “ A spokesperson for the research team explained that educators who offered anecdotal insights into the situation suggested that factors inhibiting the growth of this technology in educational settings, including major privacy concerns, schools/districts that block access to these Web sites, and time pressure.”
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  • 12. Conclusion
    • Social networking could be a useful tool in education if schools allowed the use of the sites
    • Students can benefit from social networking sites in many ways
    • Students can build skills that they may need one day once finished with school
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  • 13. References
    • Aronowitz, S. (2009). Educator Use of Social Networking Lags Behind Interest THE Journal . Retrieved from http://thejournal.com/articles/2009/11/13/educator-use-of-social-networking-lags-behind-interest.aspx?sc_lang=en
    • Deubel, P. (2009). Social Networking in Schools: Incentives for Participation. THE Journal . Retrieved from http://thejournal.com/articles/2009/09/16/social-networking-in-schools-incentives-for-participation.aspx?sc_lang=en
    • Reynard, R. (2009). Beyond Social Networking: Building Toward Learning Communities. THE Journal . Retrieved from http://thejournal.com/articles/2009/07/15/beyond-social-networking-building-toward-learning-communities.aspx?sc_lang=en