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Responder Edition12

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The Responder is a bi-weekly command information publication for the servicemembers and civilians of Joint Task Force Haiti

The Responder is a bi-weekly command information publication for the servicemembers and civilians of Joint Task Force Haiti

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  • 1. THE RESPONDER Vol. I, Issue 12 Telling the Joint Task Force-Haiti story ac al l to du ty March 24, 2010 JTF-Bravo hits ground running by Staff Sgt. Bryan Franks Joint Task Force-Bravo Public Affairs PORT AU PRINCE, Haiti - Members of Joint Task Force-Bravo, Soto Cano Air Base, Honduras, worked all afternoon and into the evening to ready two of their UH- 60 Blackhawks for rotary airlift operations March 21 in support of Joint Task Force- Haiti. Maintainers and aircrew from 1st Battalion, 228th Aviation Regiment worked side by side to accomplish the unloading and reassembling of UH-60s so they could begin the transition process with the Navy rotary assets that have been serving JTF-Haiti for the past couple months. Deployed members from 1st Battalion, 228th Aviation Regiment race against the sun “I’m very pleased with our team…at to get their UH-60s unfolded and operationally ready March 21. The 1-228th along with other members of Joint Task Force-Bravo from Soto Cano Air Base, Honduras deployed this point we’re ahead of schedule,” said in support of Joint task Force-Haiti March 21 and 22. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Lt. Col. Salome Herrera, commander, Bryan Franks/Joint Task Force-Bravo Public Affairs) 1-228th. “The advance team did a really great job of laying the ground work “It’s because of the teamwork and attitude control within the week. which allowed us to come right off the of our personnel that enable us to get this “We are excited about our opportunity plane and begin working on our aircraft.” far,” said Herrera. “We have been well to contribute to this global effort here in The more than 40-member team planned received by JTF-Haiti, specifically the 24th Haiti,” said Herrera. to have at least one aircraft operationally Air Expeditionary Group. They have really JTF-Haiti is the U.S. military’s task force ready by the end of their first day in Haiti. gone above and beyond to support us.” providing disaster relief assistance, to Haiti However, they were able to get a second Aircrew members began a change over following the Jan. 12 earthquake. aircraft operational as well. with the Navy March 22 and will take full Clinton, Bush visit Haiti by Pvt. Samantha D. Hall 11th PAD PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti- troops on the ground, embassy workers, Former Presidents George W. Bush and Bill and Haitian nationals. Clinton visited Haiti March 22 on behalf of “Thank you for your service, members of the Clinton-Bush Haiti Fund which was the embassy, fellow agencies and military established to raise money for long-term people here and the Haitian nationals for recovery efforts. They wanted to remind what you do here, day in and day out,” donors of the long road ahead and the Clinton said. Former President George W. Bush ad- immense need for help during the recovery Troops from LSA Dragon were able dresses members of Joint Task Force Haiti, process. to take some time off work to hear both U.S. Embassy staff, and USAID staff mem- bers in the center of the U.S. Embassy in Bush and Clinton visited internally former presidents speak. Haiti. Both Presidents Clinton and Bush displaced persons camps and even made are in Haiti to show their support. (U.S. a stop at the U.S. Embassy to thank the see VISIT on p. 4 Navy photo by Senior Chief Mass Commu- nication Specialist Spike Call)
  • 2. March 24, 2010 Page 2 407th returns to Ft. Bragg Not far from the UN Headquarters, a UN soldier directs and monitors traffic Maj. Gen. Simeon Trombitas, deputy commanding general, JTF-Haiti, stops near the Toussaint Louverture Interna- to talk with several Soldiers from Alpha Company, 407th Brigade Support tional Airport in Port-au-Prince. UN Sol- Battalion, 82nd Airborne Corps, while they play a game of hearts at the air- diers perform security operations daily, field March 21. After arriving two months ago to support Operation Unified ensuring the safety of the people of Haiti. Response, Soldiers are returning home to Fort Bragg, N.C. (U.S. Army photo (Photo by PFC Jasmine Slaton /11th PAD) by Pvt. Samantha D. Hall/11th PAD) Haitians work together to rebuild nation by Pvt. Cody Barber 11th PAD These shirts symbolize the cooperative PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI – The effort of the people and the start of getting earthquake on Jan. 12 left countless people this nation back on its feet. victim to a disaster that would leave a “We see great examples of that every mark in the history books as well as in day and it’s absolutely essential to their their lives. Where their homes once stood, recovery process,” said Lt. Gen. Ken Keen, is nothing more but a pile of memories. commander, Joint Task Force Haiti. The foundation of Haiti was ripped from There is also a new program called the roots but is now being rebuilt brick by Sponsor a Family. This program focuses on brick and day by day. That would not have the idea that Haitians whose homes were been possible if it was not for the help of not damaged by the earthquake could invite one Haitian to another. displaced families into their homes to live If you walk down the streets of Haiti, you with them. Lt. Gen. Ken Keen, commander, Joint Task will see a group of Haitians wearing bright With the Haitians working hand in hand Force-Haiti, talks with military and a lo- yellow shirts picking up trash and clearing cal resident in downtown Haiti on Mar. 23, with international organizations and each about relocating those displaced by the rubble. This is a program called Cash for other, the spirit of Haiti will rise from the earthquake. (U.S. Army photo by Pvt. Cody Work, which gives Haitians the chance to rubble, building new memories and a hope Barber/11th PAD) help their country while also being paid. for a brighter future. THE RESPONDER Telling the Joint Task Force-Haiti story ac all to du ty The Responder is an electronic newsletter published every Wednesday and Saturday for the Soldiers, Sailors, Coast Guardsmen, Airmen and Marines of JTF-Haiti. Commander JTF-Haiti Lt. Gen. P. K. (Ken) Keen Responder Staff: The editor can be reached at The Responder Command Senior Enlisted Advisor JTF-Haiti Sgt. Maj. Louis M. Espinal Editor Sgt. 1st. Class Debra Thompson office located in the LSA Dragon sustainment JTF-Haiti Public Affairs Officer Col. David Johnson Layout/Design Pvt. Samantha Hall tent, by DSN phone: 413-254-8007 or JTF-Haiti Public Affairs Senior Enlisted Advisor Sgt. Maj. Rick Black by email: JTFHPAOCI@CORE1.DJC2.MIL This newspaper is an authorized publication for the members of Joint Task Force-Haiti. Content of The Responder are not necessarily the official views of, or endorsed by the U.S. Government. or the Department of Defense. The Responder is an unofficial publication authorized by Army Regulation 360-1. Editorial content is prepared, edited and provided by the Public Affairs office of Joint Task Force-Haiti. The Responder is an electronic newsletter distributed by the JTF-H PAO. All photos are Department of Defense unless otherwise credited.
  • 3. March 24, 2010 Page 3 CT Guardsmen reflect on mission at Hotel Montana by Staff Sgt. Jon Soucy National Guard Bureau Unit members also relied on each other for support PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti – during the recovery operations. The earthquake that rocked this “We kept an open door policy city left many of its structures and set rank aside if anybody damaged or destroyed, needed to talk or had any including one landmark that questions,” said Jones, who many say represented a sense added that there were briefings of stability within the city. and other opportunities for The Hotel Montana, a four- those at the site to discuss star hotel where diplomats, or work through any issues. dignitaries and other “We’re a pretty strong group world leaders often stayed, to begin with,” said Putinas. collapsed during the Jan. 12 “I think it was a great team earthquake trapping many that we put together, and we of its guests in the rubble. were there for each other.” A few made it out alive, Jones recalled the day the and the task of finding remains of Air Force Lt. Col. and identifying those who Ken Bourland were recovered. didn’t fell to a variety of “They said he was still in organizations, including search his uniform,” said Jones. “His and recovery teams from body was covered, and he France, Mexico, Canada and As members of the services flight for the Connecticut Air Na- was moved out of the rubble members of the U.S. military. tional Guard’s 103rd Airlift Wing, Tech. Sgt. Chris Jones (left) and all of us stopped working As a member of the services and Tech. Sgt. Bambi Putinas volunteered to do search and re- and we went to attention and covery at the destroyed Hotel Montana in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. flight for the Connecticut Air saluted as he was moved The four-star hotel collapsed during the Jan. 12 earthquake National Guard’s 103rd Airlift trapping many of its guests in the rubble. The two worked with past us. It was our way of Wing, Tech Sgt. Bambi Putinas search and recovery teams from France, Mexico, Canada and paying final respects to him.” said her job encompasses other branches of the U.S. military. (U.S. photo by Staff Sgt. Jon Soucy/National Guard Bureau) For those at the site, doing not only personnel issues, the job was something food services and lodging, an important job to do, “Some people wanted to they took great pride in. but also mortuary affairs. but also a difficult one. go out every day, no matter “We received a great sense of “We all volunteered to come “It was hard,” she said. what,” said Putinas. “You fulfillment in the job we were here, but we had no idea “Sometimes you could think that you’re going to doing,” said Jones. “We had what we would be doing,” actually put a face with a name find somebody one day and an extreme amount of pride she said. “In the back of or an article or something you just keep on searching, in the job that we had done.” our minds, we all thought that was inscribed.” hoping to find someone.” And that is something possibly mortuary affairs.” For many who worked at the Though it is part of that will stay with them When a call for volunteers site, it was an opportunity to the services mission set, long after they return home. to assist at the Hotel Montana provide a sense of closure to mortuary affairs is not a “I think I’ll be telling my site was put out, Putinas was the grieving family members skill that unit members family members about the team one of many from her unit of those who died in the hotel. use on a regular basis. I worked with,” said Putinas. to volunteer for the mission. “...we were recovering those “It was a lot of nerves “And how great it was to work “We would help with the that had fallen at the (Hotel) the first time we went out with the Army, the Navy, the preliminary identification of Montana, so that they could there,” said Jones. “We do French, the Canadians, and remains and make sure they be returned to their loved a lot of training, but this how people from all aspects of got back home safely and ones and bring closure,” said was our first real-world life could come together for one also any articles, luggage, Tech Sgt. Chris Jones, also experience handling this mission, in a country that none personal effects,” she said. with the 103rd AW. “We aspect of our career field. It of us ever thought we would “We helped to document were sending them home.” was a lot of nerves, a lot of come to, and pull together and what we found, and those That was part of what made anxiety, but everyone got do a mission that needed to be also would be shipped home.” many who worked at the out there and did their job done.” Putinas said it was site go back day after day. and handled it very well.
  • 4. March 24, 2010 Page 4 Naval officer to assist with rainy season preparation by Spec. William Begley 11th PAD PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti- Lt. Cmdr. John said Jeffrey. “We are working on getting Jeffrey, a Civil Engineering Corps officer these canals cleaned up before the rainy for the U.S. Navy, is a leader, a husband, a season.” father, as well as a Sailor. Jeffrey and NAVFAC are working closely On top of all of this, Jeffrey is the with the government of Haiti and USAID to director of the Facilities Engineering and tackle this huge task. Once a priority project Acquisition Division (FEAD) at Public is identified and assessed, then appropriate Works Department in Pensacola, Fla., and action is determined, and the project is sub- is deployed to Haiti from Naval Air Station contracted out to American firms with the Pensacola in support of Operation Unified requirement that they hire local Haitians as Response. employees to do the work. This is just one Jeffrey deployed to be part of the of the ways the joint task force is working Naval Facilities Engineering Command together with organizations helping Lt. Cmdr. John Jeffrey just recently per- formed a site assessment at a canal near (NAVFAC) team. The NAVFAC team has Haitians to help themselves. some internally displaced persons camps. taken on a very important mission here in Jeffrey has been married to his wife for The canals are full of garbage and need to Haiti. The team does structural assessments 12 years and they have two children, an be cleared before the rainy season hits to and has been training engineers to help 11-year-old daughter and a 6-year-old prevent flooding in the camps. (U.S. Army photo by Spc. William R. Begley/11th PAD) with these assessments. Another member son. As a father, Jeffrey was moved by the of the NAVFAC team is Dennis Smith, an hardships of the displaced families that he on his experience. engineer from Carson City, Nev. Smith is encountered. “It’s a great experience to work with all of glad to have Jeffrey as a part of the team. “Seeing these young children in this the different services,” said Jeffrey. “Seeing “It’s good to have an engineer that has environment, no shelter, inadequate us come together to provide humanitarian experience,” said Smith. supplies of food and water, poor sanitation, assistance to the Haitian people is very While in Haiti, Jeffrey has been tasked your heart goes out to them,” said Jeffrey. rewarding.” to assist in the coordination of cleaning out “I think what we are doing here is much When Jeffrey arrived in Haiti it had been several drainage canals in Port-Au-Prince needed and I’m glad I get to contribute to raining hard for two days. This increased to prevent flooding in the lower-lying that,” Jeffrey said. the sense of urgency and importance of internally displaced persons (IDP) camps. Jeffrey has been in the military for a the mission that Jeffrey and the team at These canals have become a dumping total of 13 years, with 10 of those years NAVFAC share. ground for the locals to put garbage and spent in the Navy, and the other three as While it’s a race against time for Jeffrey other waste in. an infantryman in the Army. As a service and the team, rain or shine they will do “I just came back from doing a site member who has served in two different everything in their power to complete this assessment at a canal near an IDP camp,” branches of the military, Jeffrey reflected mission in time. VISIT continued from p. 1 “We really appreciated actually coming to the spot them taking time to come where it happened. It reassured out and support what we’re me that we’re doing all that doing,” Spc. Sarah Lystra, we can to help the people of administration specialist, Haiti and that we are making a U.S. Army South, deployed difference.” from San Antonio, Texas. Senior Airmen Joseph D. Clinton also said he Meade, communications wanted to thank people for technician, 49th their services rendered in the Communications Squadron, immediate aftermath of the 49th Fighter Wing, Holloman earthquake. Air Force Base, deployed from “It showed that they believed New Mexico, also attended the in what they stand for,” said visit. Spc. David Reed, mechanic, “Hearing them speak showed U.S. Army South, deployed they were behind what they from San Antonio, Texas. were talking about,” Meade Sgt. Maj. Luis Gonzalez smiles as he gets his picture taken with “They’re not just on TV said. “They were showing former President George W. Bush inside the Embassy of The talking about the earthquake continuing support for the Haiti United States, Port-au-Prince, Haiti Mar. 22. (U.S. Army photo and devastation; they’re relief effort.” by Pvt. Cody Barber/11th PAD)
  • 5. March 24, 2010 Page 5 Civilian workers Maj. Gen. Trombitas visits camps help military by Pvt. Cody Barber 11th PAD PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI – Not all of JTF-Haiti is made up of those in uniform. Some of the work here is done by civilians assigned to the task force. Katharyne Gallagher is a Department of Defense civilian employee, assigned to Navy Facility Engineer and Command, NAVFAC. Gallagher volunteered to go to Haiti and has been here since Feb. 9. She travels around Haiti and performs damage assessments of buildings that were either destroyed or damaged by the massive earthquake that battered Haiti on Jan. 12. Gallagher works with a crew of 50 personnel, and together they have checked numerous structures. “For 15 days we would send out a group of 4,” said Gallagher. “In those 15 days we checked approximately 1,400 buildings.” Each building they check has to be Maj. Gen. Simeon Trombitas, deputy commanding general, JTF-Haiti, takes a min- marked accordingly to how much damage ute to talk with a group of children March 21. Trombitas took the morning to walk it received during the earthquake. through several internally displaced persons camps and see how the conditions were “There are three different colors, red, for people living there. He also spoke with local nationals and got feedback on how yellow and green,” said Gallagher. “Red they were living. (U.S. Army photo by Pvt. Samantha D. Hall/11th PAD) basically means that the building has either collapsed or is so severely damaged that it can’t be repaired. Yellow means the building is damaged to the point that you shouldn’t be in there but you can repair it and green is superficial and very minor damage.” In efforts of coordination and collaboration, the team trained a group of Haitian engineers on how to assess building damages. “We need them to start doing things on their own so when we leave, they will have the resources they need to complete the job,” Gallagher said. The Haitians in training went through an in-class situation where they were shown how to do an ACT 20, which is a detailed evaluation safety assessment form. After that, a few of the Haitian engineers went out and completed field training exercises. “We went through buildings with them and we asked for their opinion on the status of the building and decided if we agreed with them,” Gallagher said. “We wanted to make sure they looked at things the way we thought they should.” Maj. Gen. Simeon Trombitas, deputy commanding general, JTF-Haiti, sat down at Gallagher said by the end of February an internally displaced persons camp and spoke with the locals in charge. Trombitas the Haitian engineers finished training wanted to see what help the locals were getting and how they were preparing for and took control of the job and are doing the rainy season. The general also stopped by several other camps to see how the living conditions were. (U.S. Army photo by Pvt. Samantha D. Hall/11th PAD) approximately 1,500 buildings assessments each day.
  • 6. March 24, 2010 Page 6 POSTCARDS FROM HAITI At an internally displaced persons camp, a A Haitian woman sells produce at a market right outside a riverbed camp. She was young girl gets camera shy. She is one of one of many Haitians selling things likes squash, carrots and potatoes. Other vendors many children who run around camps, pos- sold canned goods and grain. (U.S. Army photo by Pvt. Samantha D. Hall/11th PAD) ing for photos when units pass through. (U.S. Army photo by Pvt. Cody Barber/11th PAD) Two local Haitian children play hide-and-seek be- Billy goats run around a destroyed building at a riverbed camp. Many ani- tween tents at a riverbed camp. The children are mals now run around Port-au-Prince because the fencing that penned them only two of many locals who were displaced by Jan. was destroyed in the earthquake. (U.S. Army photo by Pvt. Samantha D. 12th’s earthquake. (U.S. Army photo by Pvt. Sa- Hall/11th PAD) mantha D. Hall/11th PAD)

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