Doable Debate in the ESL/EFL Classroom

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This workshop invites educators to participate in and learn more about debates that can be adapted to their own home educational circumstances.

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  • Learn vocabulary, etc.; learn to evaluate what read and hear; learn self-control; learn to work with others; learn to access and select info
  • OVERGENERALIZATION: going from a general case to specific
  • Students bring this for accountability.
  • With students with better English skills, these can be extended.
  • Doable Debate in the ESL/EFL Classroom

    1. 1. Doable Debate in the ESL/EFL Classroom TESOL Boston March 25, 2010 WORKSHOP Harry Harris Hakuoh University
    2. 2. Outline <ul><li>Why debate? </li></ul><ul><li>Issues </li></ul><ul><li>Judging Criteria </li></ul><ul><li>Score Sheet </li></ul><ul><li>Debate Fallacies </li></ul><ul><li>Student Reminders </li></ul><ul><li>Sample Student worksheet </li></ul><ul><li>Debate Schedule </li></ul><ul><li>Suggested Reading </li></ul>
    3. 3. WHY DEBATE? <ul><li>Language usage: improve vocabulary/language skills </li></ul><ul><li>Critical thinking: evaluate what read and hear </li></ul><ul><li>Reasoned discourse: speak logically & control emotions </li></ul><ul><li>Cooperative efforts: improve social skills </li></ul><ul><li>Research: access/select information </li></ul>
    4. 4. Issues <ul><li>Debate structure </li></ul><ul><li>Knowledge of topic </li></ul><ul><li>Language fluency </li></ul>
    5. 5. Judging Criteria Opponent ideas are used well in refutation. Effectiveness Support provided and/or serious thought done on proposition Example, Facts, Statistics, Sources Debaters speak clearly/audibly. Voice Debaters sit up, use gestures, and make eye contact. Body Language Arguments consistent/related to the proposition Consistency, Relevance “ Difficult” words defined Definitions Info presented clearly with transitions Organization
    6. 6. Score Sheet <ul><li>PROPOSITION: </li></ul>TOTAL Effective. Effective. Ex., etc. Ex., etc. Voice Voice Body Lang. Body Lang. Cons./Rel. Cons./Rel. Def. Def. Org. Org. CON 0-5 NOTES NOTES 0-5 PRO
    7. 7. DEBATE FALLACIES <ul><li>OVERGENERALIZATION </li></ul><ul><li>Ex. Cell phones are useless and should be banned. </li></ul><ul><li>IGNORING THE ISSUE </li></ul><ul><ul><li>AD HOMINEM </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>FALSE APPEALS TO AUTHORITY (Momma said…) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>APPEALS TO IGNORANCE </li></ul></ul><ul><li>FALSE CAUSES </li></ul><ul><ul><li>AFTER THIS, THEREFORE, BECAUSE OF THIS </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>EITHER/OR </li></ul></ul>
    8. 8. Student Reminders <ul><li>1. Team members take turns. </li></ul><ul><li>2. Debates are timed. </li></ul><ul><li>3. During argument periods, opponents listen & take notes. </li></ul><ul><li>4. During question prep period, prepare requests for explanations etc. </li></ul><ul><li>5. During question period, go on to next request if opponents are slow to respond. </li></ul><ul><li>6. During refutation prep, teams work alone or with other PRO/CON teams. </li></ul><ul><li>7. During refutation period, opponents listen & take notes. </li></ul><ul><li>8. During final appeal period, review notes in prep for final speech to judge. </li></ul><ul><li>9. Final appeal points out own strengths and opponent weaknesses. </li></ul><ul><li>10. After debate, judge evaluates and determines winner. </li></ul>
    9. 9. SAMPLE STUDENT WORKSHEET 1. Dogs can guard homes. 2. Dogs offer closer companionship. 3. Dogs can be taught tricks. 1. Cats are more independent. 2. Cats are generally quieter. 3. Cats are cleaner and easier to take care of. CON PRO Cats make betters pets than dogs. Proposition: Date: March 25, 2010 Name: Taro Kondo
    10. 10. DEBATE SCHEDULE 1 1 st Negative argument 1 minute 2 nd Negative argument 1 minute 3 rd Negative argument 1 minute 1 st Affirmative argument 1 minute 2 nd Affirmative argument 1 minute 3 rd Affirmative argument 1 minute CON PRO
    11. 11. DEBATE SCHEDULE 2 PREPARE REFUTATIONS 5-MINUTE BREAK TO 3-MINUTE QUESTION PERIOD 3-MINUTE QUESTION PERIOD PREPARE QUESTIONS 5-MINUTE BREAK TO CON PRO
    12. 12. DEBATE SCHEDULE 3 Refutation of Pro’s 1 st argument 1 minute Refutation of Pro’s 2 nd argument 1 minute Refutation of Pro’s 3 rd argument 1 minute Refutation of Con’s 1 st argument 1 minute Refutation of Con’s 2 nd argument 1 minute Refutation of Con’s 3 rd argument 1 minute CON PRO
    13. 13. DEBATE SCHEDULE 4 OF WINNERS JUDGE ANNOUNCEMENT FINAL SPEECH 1 minute FINAL SPEECH 1 minute PREPARE FINAL SPEECH 2-MINUTE BREAK TO CON PRO
    14. 14. Suggested Reading <ul><li>Hansen, J. (2007). Teaching Debate in Japan: A Review of Resources and Materials to Meet the Demands of Teaching Japanese English Learners . </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.wilmina.ac.jp/ojc/edu/kiyo_2007/kiyo_37_PDF/05.pdf </li></ul><ul><li>Harris, H. (2006). English Debate in the Japanese Classroom: An Introductory Outline. Hakuoh University Ronshu, 21 (1), 47-74. http://ci.nii.ac.jp/vol_issue/nels/AN10016387/ISS0000365365_en.html </li></ul><ul><li>IDEA: International Debate Education Association. (n.d.). http://www.idebate.org/debatabase/topic_index.php </li></ul><ul><li>Whitman, G. (2005). Debate . (n.d.). </li></ul><ul><li> http://www.csun.edu/~dgw61315/dgwdebate.html </li></ul>
    15. 15. Thank you for your participation

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