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S Vitto And Bullying.2

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An overview on the research on Bullying by S Vitto, author of In Search of a Heart.

An overview on the research on Bullying by S Vitto, author of In Search of a Heart.

Published in: Health & Medicine, Career

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  • I have just come across your slide presentation... its relevance remains and it has been helpful to review.

    It is our view, that because students are at a time in their development where their self confidence to speak up also plays a factor in bullying at schools, student feedback in a manner that provides safety and if needed anonymity is important.

    We are keen to assist at bringing attention to this issue, but also to providing a tool to assist.
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Transcript

  • 1. BULLYING Presented by: Steven Vitto, M.A., CCII. Behavior Consultant M.A.I.S.D. Behavioral Consultant A Positive Behavioral Support Project
  • 2. What is bullying?
    • Bullying is repeated intentionally cruel actions involving the same children in the same roles, bully versus victim. Bullying occurs once every seven minutes and on average, the incidents are short lasting only 37 seconds but the scars from bullying can last a lifetime.
  • 3. Bullying can take many forms
    • Verbal taunts, name-calling, put-downs
    • Threats and intimidation
    • Stealing of money and possessions
    • Exclusion from peer group
    • Ethnic or racial slurs
    • Gender slurs and sexual harassment
  • 4. Prevalence
    • 15% of students are involved
    • 9% are victims
    • 7% bully others repeatedly
    • More students in younger grades are victimized
    • Boys are more likely to be bullies than girls
  • 5. The intent of a bully is to put the victim in distress .
  • 6. Dynamics of Bullying
    • A power difference between bully and victim
    • Bullies tend to be confident, aggressive, and lack empathy for the victim
    • Bullies come from homes where there is poor supervision, and modeling of a tolerance for aggressive behavior
    • Victims tend to be quiet, passive children with few friends
    • Victims do not respond effectively to aggressive actions.
    • Bullying often done so that adults are not aware of it.
    • Victims are ashamed, and often don’t tell an adult.
  • 7. Bully Myth
    • It is a myth that bullies are insecure underneath their bravado. Research indicates that their self-esteem is average or above average.
  • 8. Most victims do not report bullying
    • Feelings of shame
    • Fear of retaliation
    • Fear that adults can not or will not protect the child in the setting where the bullying is taking place
  • 9. Patterns of bullying and victimization are different for boys and girls.
    • Female victims are bullied by both boys and girls.
    • Male victims are usually bullied by males.
    • Boy are more like to perpetrate “direct bullying”
    • Girls are more likely to engage in “indirect bullying” (e.g. social exclusion, manipulation of friendship relationships, spreading rumors, etc.)
  • 10. What causes bullying?
    • Family Factors
    • Poor supervision
    • Lack of warmth
    • Modeling of aggression at home (parent to parent, or parent to child)
    • Older siblings who bully
    • Witnessing of spousal battering
  • 11. Individual Factors
    • Temperament
    • Active and Impulsive
    • Physical Strength
    • Superiority Complex
  • 12. School Factors
    • Lack of Supervision during unstructured times
    • Denial of the problem
    • Type of intervention
    • Climate
    • Community Building Efforts
  • 13. Who are the victims?
    • Tend to be quiet and shy
    • Tend to be passive
    • Lack confidence in physical abilities and strength
    • Poor or deviant social skills
    • A subgroup who are “provocative” (i.e., they can be both bully and victim)
    • Difference in appearance or ability
  • 14. What are the long term consequences for the victim?
    • Tend to be unhappy child
    • Often try to avoid school
    • Suffer from fear and anxiety
    • Low self esteem
    • High incidence of suicidal or self-destructive behavior
  • 15. What are the long term consequences for the bully?
    • Tend to be aggressive adults
    • Significantly higher rates of criminal convictions.
    • Tend to be negative and anti-social
    • Tend to model bullying to their children
    • Tend to have difficulty as an employee
  • 16.
    • ALL CHILDREN, INCLUDING BYSTANDERS, ARE NEGATIVELY EFFECTED WHEN BULLYING OCCURS
  • 17. Ways to Stop Bullying?
    • Don’t frame reporting as tattling
    • Provide good supervision
    • Provide effective consequences for bullies
    • Provide social and interpersonal skill training
    • Provide ongoing community building
    • Creating a supportive and inclusive environment
  • 18. Description of the Research
    • Interviews conducted by telephone in August 2001.
    • Nationwide random sample of more than 300 parents and more than 300 teachers.
    • Parents with at least one K-6 child during the past school year.
    • Teachers who taught at least one K-6 class during the past school year.
  • 19. Key Findings: Bullying in School
    • The five causes of bullying in school mentioned most often by both parents and teachers are:
    • Low self-esteem/insecurity
    • Learned behavior from parents
    • Lack of parental involvement/attention
    • Lack of discipline/punishment
    • Child is different in some way
  • 20. Parents: Causes of Bullying Parents: What would you say are the most important causes of bullying in school?
    • Top five responses:
    • Lack of discipline/punishment
    • Low self-esteem/insecurity
    • Lack of parental involvement/attention
    • Learned behavior from parents
    • Child is different in some way
  • 21. Teachers: Causes of Bullying Teachers: What would you say are the most important causes of bullying in school?
    • Top five responses:
    • Low self-esteem/insecurity
    • Child is different in some way
    • Learned behavior from parents
    • Lack of parental involvement/attention
    • Lack of discipline/punishment
  • 22. Key Findings: Bullying in School
    • Preventing or dealing with bullying:
    • Parents see their role as involving pursuit of solutions with other parties, such as teachers, school administrators and parents of the bully.
    • Teachers mainly see their role in terms of their own actions rather than pursuing solutions with others
  • 23. Parents: Preventing Bullying Parents: What do you think a parent's role should be in preventing or dealing with bullying? Three of the four top items mentioned by parents involve pursuing solutions with other adults.
    • Top five responses:
    • Discourage bullying behavior in own child
    • Pursue solutions with teacher
    • Pursue solutions with parents of bully
    • Pursue solutions with principal
    • Teach child methods of dealing with bully
  • 24. Teachers: Preventing Bullying Parents: What do you think a teacher's role should be in preventing or dealing with bullying?
    • Top five responses:
    • Communication with children
    • Teach child methods of dealing with bully
    • Get involved in situation
    • Discipline bully
    • Teach children tolerance
    Top five items mentioned by teachers involve their own actions rather than pursuing solutions with other adults.
  • 25. THE END