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Behavior management and elementary students with ADHD
Behavior management and elementary students with ADHD
Behavior management and elementary students with ADHD
Behavior management and elementary students with ADHD
Behavior management and elementary students with ADHD
Behavior management and elementary students with ADHD
Behavior management and elementary students with ADHD
Behavior management and elementary students with ADHD
Behavior management and elementary students with ADHD
Behavior management and elementary students with ADHD
Behavior management and elementary students with ADHD
Behavior management and elementary students with ADHD
Behavior management and elementary students with ADHD
Behavior management and elementary students with ADHD
Behavior management and elementary students with ADHD
Behavior management and elementary students with ADHD
Behavior management and elementary students with ADHD
Behavior management and elementary students with ADHD
Behavior management and elementary students with ADHD
Behavior management and elementary students with ADHD
Behavior management and elementary students with ADHD
Behavior management and elementary students with ADHD
Behavior management and elementary students with ADHD
Behavior management and elementary students with ADHD
Behavior management and elementary students with ADHD
Behavior management and elementary students with ADHD
Behavior management and elementary students with ADHD
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Behavior management and elementary students with ADHD

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Published in: Education, Health & Medicine
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  • Could I ask what was the content Training Course for Teachers ? and did this include practical application and hands on training for all staff. Did parents receive any training at all.
    Do you have a sample of the training course provided for parents and any related videos or podcasts.
    Thank you

    Joseph - Child Psychologist (UK)
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  • Good show!
    You might appreciate this additional set of criteria on the biomedical side:
    http://slidesha.re/1aLiWuA
    Thanks,
    cp
    Author: New ADHD Medication Rules - Brain Science & Common Sense
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  • This is an excellent study and the outcome and remedial strategies are superb.
    I would like to ask one question that is there any link between ADHD and Juvenal delinquency, will ADHD children have any role in creating conflicts in the society in their later stages of life.
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  • adhd
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  • 1. Behavior Management and Elementary Students with ADHD Team A: Alice Allen, Emily Carter, Shari Hardy, Bobbi Murrell, and Amanda Pegues University of Phoenix March 21, 2009
  • 2. Chapter One: Introduction
  • 3. Problem Statement The problem, as indicated in this study, is that due to the lack of time and training, elementary school teachers are not using effective behavior management strategies for children with ADHD who frequently disrupt classroom instruction.
  • 4. Purpose To determine if behavior management and  modification strategies will result in greater learning and higher test scores for elementary students with ADHD. To determine if consistent boundaries, a  highly predictable routine and external reinforcers will reduce the amount of impulsivity and distraction in the classroom and lessen the impact of the disruptive students on the other children.
  • 5. Community Matthews Elementary School  – 2 of 4 third grade classrooms – 600 students and 75 teachers – Located in a country club community – City population:15,728 74.9% are white families  14.7% are black families  – Median annual income of $110,993
  • 6. Work Setting Matthews Elementary School  – Known for success with children with disabilities and behavior problems – School of Excellence Award for past 7 years – Fully staffed Special Education Team Majority of students diagnosed with ADHD  are assigned to two of the four third grade classes to ensure consistency with educational process of the students
  • 7. Work Setting (cont.) Classroom A Classroom B Twenty-one students Twenty students   Seven have ADHD Eleven have ADHD   Test Group Control Group   Mission Statement is “BEST” Mission Statement is “We will   (Believe in themselves and their strive to do our personal best by ability to achieve; Embrace practicing active listening, diversity and learn from it; Strive respect, caring, cooperation, to make ourselves, our school, effort, honesty and patience” and our community a better place; and Treat others the way we wish to be treated) 12 out of the 18 students with ADHD are medicated 14 of the 18 students are male and 4 are female Two teachers and one teacher’s aide will be observed
  • 8. Writer’s Role Five members of the School Improvement team: Amore Bambinos Dr. Dr. Addison Davies Dr. Anna Bassin Dr. Norgina Wright Dr. Elizabeth Cromwell Each member has extensive background in dealing with students with ADHD
  • 9. Chapter Two: Study of the Problem
  • 10. Problem Description Difficulties with controlling impulsivity  – Children are interfering with the teacher’s ability to teach – Children without ADHD are being affected by poor behavior of other students Staying on task is difficult  – so class work, homework assignments, activities, and projects are often incomplete Organization can be problematic  – Homework and books are regularly misplaced or unaccounted for
  • 11. Problem Documentation Observation of the classroom environment  – Setting has been observed to assess the behavioral tendencies of the children – Teachers have been observed to determine their effectiveness in instructing and interacting with students who have ADHD Questionnaires  – Measure teacher’s understanding of behavior management strategies for children with ADHD Periodic review of lesson plans  – Demonstrate if the teacher’s lesson plans are keeping pace with standards Review of student’s academic performance 
  • 12. Highlights of Literature Review “Medical treatment can reduce a hyperactive child’s  symptoms. But cultivation of internal control and good behavior requires behavioral treatment, and, especially, a relationship between pre-behavioral stimulation and response” (Chang, Chang, & Shih, 2007, p. 153). “Although children with ADHD experience significant  academic and behavioral difficulties, research suggests that the majority of classroom teachers lack knowledge of what constitutes appropriate interventions and modifications (Parker, 1992)” (Nowacek & Mamlin, 2007, p. 28).
  • 13. Highlights of Literature Review (cont.) By analyzing the classroom, teachers can make  themselves more organized and more responsible so that they can encounter fewer disappointments (Heward & Wood, 2003)” (Bloh & Axelrod, 2008, p. 52). “Effectively teaching students with ADHD often  requires the use of a variety of interventions in the classroom. Researchers (e.g., Eckert & Hintze, 2000) have suggested that teachers' acceptability of various treatments may influence their willingness to utilize them” (Vereb & DiPerna, 2004, p. 427).
  • 14. Highlights of Literature Review (cont.) “Generally, best results occur when a team  approach is used with parents/family, school personnel and therapists or physicians working together” (Kirkpatrick, 2005, p.23). “Attendance and engagement are critical  variables in the success of parent training, as studies have shown that the degree with which parents implement the procedures as instructed affects the benefits to the child (Hinshaw et al., 2000)” (Evans et al., 2008, p. 52).
  • 15. Causative Analysis Many teachers lack a basic understanding of ADHD  Students are not self-monitoring or practicing cognitive behavior  management skills Teachers may lack the knowledge of appropriate interventions and  modifications The lack of teaching experience may be a factor  A lack of special education courses and training may hinder the  progress that a teacher can make while accommodating ADHD learners ADHD frequently coexists with other problems such as learning  disabilities, Oppositional Disorder, and depression Insufficient collaboration on part of the parents, family, school  personnel and physicians or psychiatrists
  • 16. Chapter Three: Outcomes and Evaluation
  • 17. Goals and Expectations Teachers will receive training that will allow them  to implement effective behavior management strategies with their students. Well-informed teachers will execute systems  designed to create a calm and productive learning environment. ADHD learners will flourish under the guidance and  instruction of a teacher who has learned to accommodate their needs as well as those of the other students.
  • 18. Expected Outcomes Disruptions will decrease by 75%  Five out of seven students with ADHD will receive  passing grades on tests, class work, and homework Benchmark test scores will increase for all  students Five out of seven students with ADHD will receive  passing grades in language arts, math, social studies, and science
  • 19. Measurement of Outcomes (should be observable and measurable) Daily log of behavior clip moves   Teacher keeps track of grades and compares them to previous marking period  Benchmark grades are compared to previous marking period  Report card grades
  • 20. Analysis of Results Compare grade outcomes and behavior logs of Class A with the control group to determine if the teacher’s training in behavior management and modification has been beneficial.
  • 21. Chapter Four: Solution Strategies
  • 22. Problem Restated The problem, as indicated in this study, is that due to the lack of time and training, elementary school teachers are not using effective behavior management strategies for children with ADHD who frequently disrupt classroom instruction.
  • 23. Behavior Modification Strategy Methods to modify behavior of students with  ADHD – Teacher Training – External reinforcement – Intermittent positive reinforcement – Daily Behavior Report Card – Self-regulation – Proper use of Time-out
  • 24. Teacher Training 40 hour training course on effectively  managing ADHD students including: – How to identify students with ADHD Inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity  – Behavior modification techniques and how to measure the student’s behavior – How to identify signs of target behaviors Target behaviors are behaviors the teacher wants to decrease or  eliminate – How to successfully use a reward system for positive behavior – Effective time-out strategies – Effectively communicating the student’s behavior with parents
  • 25. Teacher Training(cont.) Collaboration   School Psychologist Will meet once a week for four weeks for one  hour at a time Will provide in-classroom instruction   Special Education Team
  • 26. Intervention Program Peer-mediated intervention  – The first step is assigning trusted peer-partners – Next, all students and partners will be trained to self monitor and to identify alternative social skills – Every 15 minutes the teacher will give feedback and praise to the ADHD students as a form of positive reinforcement – The teacher will meet with all students once a week to see how the process is working and if adjustments need to be made – A calendar plan will be maintained that covers six weeks of training and implementation of the peer partner’s strategy to monitor the program
  • 27. References Bloh, C., & Axelrod, S. (2008, April). IDEIA and the means to change behavior should be enough:  Growing support for using applied behavior analysis in the classroom. Journal of Early & Intensive Behavior Intervention, 5(2), 52-56. Retrieved February 20, 2009, from Academic Search Complete Database. Chang, H., Chang, C., & Shih, Y. (2007, June). The process of assisting behavior modification in a  child with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. Journal of Nursing Research, 15(2), 147-155. Retrieved February 20, 2009, from CINAHL Plus with Full Text database. Evans, S., Schultz, B., & Sadler, J. (2008, August). Psychosocial interventions used to treat  children with ADHD: safety and efficacy. Journal of Psychosocial Nursing & Mental Health Services, 46(8), 49-59. Retrieved February 20, 2009, from CINAHL Plus with Full Text database. Kirkpatrick, L. (2005, Fall2005). ADHD treatment and medication: What do you need to know as an  educator?. Delta Kappa Gamma Bulletin, 72(1), 19-24. Retrieved February 20, 2009, from Academic Search Complete database. Nowacek, E., & Mamlin, N. (2007, Spring2007). General education teachers and students with  ADHD: what modifications are made?. Preventing School Failure, 51(3), 28-35. Retrieved February 20, 2009, from Academic Search Complete database. Vereb, R., & DiPerna, J. (2004, September). Teachers' knowledge of ADHD, treatments forADHD,  and treatment acceptability: An initial investigation. School PsychologyReview, 33(3), 421- 428. Retrieved February 27, 2009,from MasterFILE Premier database.

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